Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
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Développement durable et efficacité énergétique
Pour un développement durable et pour l'efficacité énergétique. «Pour ce qui est de l’avenir, il ne s’agit pas de le prévoir mais de le rendre possible. »  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising at the fastest rate ever recorded

Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising at the fastest rate ever recorded | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

For two straight years — 2015 and 2016 — atmospheric carbon dioxide has climbed by more than 3 parts per million.

According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, carbon dioxide levels jumped by three parts per million in both 2015 and 2016 and now rest at about 405 parts per million.

It’s the biggest jump ever observed at the agency’s Mauna Loa Baseline Atmospheric Observatory in Hawaii, where the measurements were recorded. Similar observations have been recorded at stations all over the world, said Pieter Tans, who leads the Carbon Cycle Greenhouse Gases group at NOAA’s Greenhouse Gas Reference Network.

Throughout the last decade, the average rate of increase has been around 2.3 parts per million per year, Tans added. 

 

Via Marc Kneepkens
Stephane Bilodeau's insight:
"All signs have suggested that we’re now living in a permanently post-400 parts per million world. In September 2016, the time of year when atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are usually at their lowest, scientists observed that the monthly average concentration still remained above this threshold. And now, the new NOAA measurements further indicate that carbon dioxide levels are only continuing to grow — and they’re rising at breakneck speed."
 
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 14, 9:48 AM

Which 'science' will be right after all? It'll be empirical, right in your face...

Rescooped by Stephane Bilodeau from sustainable architecture
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Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.


“Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...


Via Lauren Moss
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 20, 2013 11:38 AM

The Case For Tall Wood                               Michael Green Architecture

I find this hard to truly picture, but the story is solid...."the last century there has been no reason to challenge steel and concrete as the essential structural materials of large buildings. Climate change now demands that we do.....Wood is the most significant building material we use today that is grown by the sun. When harvested responsibly, wood is arguably one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and storing carbon in our buildings."

 

“I’d put my money on solar energy…I hope we don’t have to wait till oil and coal run out before we tackle that.”
~Thomas Edison, In conversation with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone March 1931

 

http://mg-architecture.ca/portfolio/tallwood/

 

 

“Known as the birthplace of the skyscraper, Chicago is an optimal location for a prototype in mass timber construction,” writes Carlos Arzate

Geovanni's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 11:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.
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Green and Healthy Buildings: monitoring consumption & ecology in the built environment

Green and Healthy Buildings: monitoring consumption & ecology in the built environment | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

According to the United Nations Environment Programme, buildings account for approximately 40 percent of worldwide energy use and are responsible for 30 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. They also play an important role in the health and wellbeing of those who inhabit them each day.

The mass of information about what makes a building green tends to concentrate on new and innovative designs that create beautiful photo spreads. While such examples are inspiring, they make up a very small percentage of all buildings in operation.

Green Buildings Alive is an environmental initiative aimed at collecting and sharing data on existing buildings between 10 and 60 years old. The data is collected from office towers in Australian Central Business Districts (CBDs) and shared on a public website.


For more on this innovative, environmental initiative that provides interactive visualizations of building-performance data to help understand the complexities and relationships among sustainability, health, and energy, read the complete article


Via Lauren Moss
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In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth

In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it

North American cities are producing substantially less wealth per ton of greenhouse gas emissions than their European counterparts.


Research has shown that if you know a country's GDP, you can pretty accurately estimate its carbon emissions. There's "almost a mechanical relationship" between the two. And as a depressing corollary: Emissions rise much faster in good times than they fall during, say, a global recession.

Cities in some parts of the world are already doing a substantially better job at decoupling these two trends than others, wringing the most wealth out of the smallest carbon footprint. These are the cities that produce the greatest amount of GDP per ton of greenhouse gasses emitted.


The Carbon Disclosure Project, along with AECOM and the C40 Cities, have calculated this "economic efficiency" for dozens of global cities that participated in a questionnaire on how they are preparing for climate change...


Via Lauren Moss
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Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
The energy that powers the world comes mostly from coal, gas, and oil, and that’s led us to CO2 levels over 390 parts per billion now, and climate change. We can think of climate change as a design question: where do we want to end up? Impact studies tell us what will happen to the planet as we warm up—it's basically a litany of horrors. At a 1.5 degree increase, we'll lose 10 percent of species. At 2 degrees, we'll lose 90 percent of coral reefs. At 3 degrees, 1 to 4 billion people will face water shortages, leading to war across the planet. We need to each understand the basic math behind energy and climate change so we can reach the right solutions. We need a massive shift to renewable energy, and we also need changes in our everyday lives. One first step is understanding your own carbon footprint. 
Via Lauren Moss
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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:24 AM

It's strange how so many are concerned about leaving debt to the next generations, but unconcerned about leaving a compromised environment.

Mercor's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:58 AM

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Electric Car's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:56 AM

What is YOUR Carbon footprint?

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The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level

The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level | Développement durable et efficacité énergétique | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Arizona State University have developed a new software system, called Hestia, that is capable of estimating greenhouse gas emissions across entire urban landscapes, all the way down to street level and individual buildings.

The project, known as Hestia after the Greek goddess of home and hearth, allows the team to combine extensive public database “data-mining” with traffic simulation and building-by-building energy-consumption modeling.

According to researchers, Hestia’s increased detail and accuracy will help cities, and possibly even other nations, identify where an investment in energy and greenhouse gas savings would have the greatest impact...


Via Lauren Moss
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