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free course: ExtJS in 4 Modules on 150 slides

Module 1:
* DHTML
* Introduction to JavaScript
* Elements of JavaScript Program
* JavaScript Statements
* Functions
* Objects
* Defining Objects
* Arrays
* Events
* Time Outs
* Integrating JavaScript with Java
* Creating Windows
* Summary
* Examples and Exercises

 

Module 2:
* Introduction of ExtJs
* Getting Started
* Fundamental Classes
* Event Handling
* Component Model
* Examples

 

Module 3:
* Getting Started with Sencha Architect
* Create and Configure Components
* Create/Configure Data Stores
* Templates & DataView
* Creating & Extending Classes
* Examples

 

Module 4:
* Internationalization
* Drag & Drop
* Hands-on Experience w/ Common Components
* TabPanel
* GridPanel
* TreePanel
* FormPanel
* Building a Theme
* Application Best Practices

 

Objectives:
At the end of this module you will be able to:
1. Write JavaScript code using all the basic elements of JavaScript Programs
2. Create Windows & Dialog Boxes
3. Use the JavaScript’s in-built objects in a web page
4. Write code that does Event Handling in HTML pages
5. Manipulate HTML Forms through JavaScript dynamically
6. Integrate Java and JavaScript through Applets


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Jan Hesse's curator insight, October 19, 2013 7:09 AM

originally its a 4 day instructor led course - so much content to grasp

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Meteor.js Fundamentals for Single Page Applications

Meteor.js Fundamentals for Single Page Applications | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

This course was a really fun course to put together, because Meteor is just an awesome platform.  After using Meteor, I actually am starting to like JavaScript.  I really like the idea of being able to build an entire application in a single language and to be able to use a single platform that takes care of all the plumbing for me.

The technology is still in its infancy, but I think it has huge potential.  Not very often I get this excited about a technology.

So, if you are interested in Meteor and want to see how you can create single page applications entirely in JavaScript with relatively little code, compared to other solutions, check out this course


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AngularJS for jQuery Developers

AngularJS for jQuery Developers | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

AngularJS is a sweet web app framework. It comes with decent official documentation and samples, it looks superior among a large number of frameworks in an almost-real-world application test (the famous TodoMVC project), and there are cool presentations and screencasts about it all over the web.

But for a developer who has not used frameworks similar to Angular before, and has mostly worked with JavaScript libraries like jQuery, there may be some difficulty in shifting from the jQuery mindset to the Angular mindset. At least there was for me, and I’d like to share some notes–maybe this will be useful to someone.


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How to create a Directive in AngularJS (simply)

How to create a Directive in AngularJS (simply) | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

When you first hear about AngularJS Directives, they appear magic in the 'omg what is going on here' way. As a newcomer to AngularJS, the idea of extending HTML with your own elements seems foreign, or a callback to IE6. Without mastering directives, you'll limit the potential of your AngularJS apps -- not cool.

It doesn't have to be this way: you can create Directives to reuse code and make templates easier for you (and future-you) to understand. You'll think of Directives as creating a DSL in HTML, and become a Wizard of unimaginable power! Ok, maybe not, but you will write easier reading code, and code that's easier to reuse.

All you need is that one example that turns the lightbulb on. Let's take an example from AngulaRails, and create a <multi-avatar> HTML element that displays a user's image, but with some requirements:

* If the user has a facebook-id, we want to use the Facebook image.

* If the user has a github username, we want to use Github's shiny avatar service.

* Otherwise, use Gravatar with the user's email.


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Angular Directive Examples

Angular Directive Examples | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Directing Angular Directives
Over the last few months, I've been digging into the Angular framework. One of the things that I really like about Angular, and hope to learn to use extremely well as I progress, is their notion of a "Directive". Directives provide a means for extending both the semantic meaning and functionality of your markup. There are many different ways to implement directives, and the documentation on the angular site is still a work in progress, so I would like to share how I've used them up to this point.

The Goal: Creating a reusable donut chart and legend
First, we have to think about how we're going to get data to feed to the chart. So, I created a quick module that contains a "Product Line", which contains "Products". The plan is to be able to use a single controller and view to be able to see a donut chart and legend for both a single Product, and the full Product Line.
Each Product has a raw goods cost, shipping cost, and markup amount. The singleton that is the Product Line has a way to get aggregated data from all products, for viewing overall costs in those categories. I then created a service for my angular app to interact with this module.


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An Ember.js beginners tutorial

An Ember.js beginners tutorial | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

There are a lot of TODO tutorials out in the wild, and I'm certainly not going to write up another one. What we're going to build today is something altogether more exciting, something never before seen in the world of introductory tutorials. Wait for it... today we are going to build a DICE ROLLER.

Hopefully our Dice Roller is going to show a couple of the interesting Ember features in an application which does not require a server backend.

The first thing that needs to be done is to build an HTML file to serve the application. For starters, this is just a matter of building a basic HTML document with the jQuery, Emberand handlebars scripts included. Handlebars is a templating language which lets you write out data bound templates that are rendered into the browser.

Ember uses a lot of convention over configuration. This basically means that when it goes to a URL, it expects a number of objects to exist with very specific names. If it doesn't find these objects, it can often create default ones.

In this case when we load our application, Ember looks for a handlebars template calledapplication. This template is loaded for every url or request and wraps up and displays the entire application. For now, this template can be quite simple, but when you build a more complex application it can include things like menus, headers and footers.

 

 


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Maintaining and Organizing UI Dependencies with Knockout.JS: Part 2

Maintaining and Organizing UI Dependencies with Knockout.JS: Part 2 | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

If you are experienced with JavaScript, you know about the ongoing war between scope, context and dealing with the this keyword. Previously, we used this on propertiesthis.studentsName = ko.observable('') to refer to the ViewModel object itself. That was all well and good because we didn’t have to worry about tracking what this meant in a nested function within studentsName.

The problem arises when our ViewModel starts becoming more complex. Say, for example, our computed observable function this.challengeCompletedCount uses a nested internal function. Internal functions create a new, separate context with a new this variable. The newthis variable is completely different from the one outside of our internal function.

So far, our little app has been easy to maintain with only one ViewModel and a couple of models, but projects inevitably get larger and more complex. Code becomes quickly cumbersome and hard to maintain, not to mention prone to global variable conflictons. To truly leverage the perks of using an MVVM (model-view-viewmodel) or MVC pattern, you must separate your code into logical modules and decouple the layers. It may take some additional time at the onset of a project, but it will save you and your team headaches (and quite possibly an Anchorman-style street brawl) in the future. So unless tridents and hand grenades are your thing, I suggest using RequireJS to modularize your code.


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A simple photo app with Knockout.js - Lesson 1

A simple photo app with Knockout.js - Lesson 1 | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

In the course introduction we look at what Knockout.js is, what architectural pattern it is built on, and how it can help us rapidly develop sophisticated, interactive user interfaces that don't turn into a tangled mess of event handlers. We also set up our development area ready to start coding in lesson 2.

In lesson 2 we add the wrapper for our app and see how easy it is to create a simple constructor for our application that accepts configuration options and supports chaining. We also saw how to use jQuery's extend method to merge the configuration object with the default properties of the application.

TBC


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VNC client on 200 lines of JavaScript

VNC client on 200 lines of JavaScript | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

In this quick blog post I’ll show you how to create a simple VNC client in about 200 lines of JavaScript.
For our goal we’re going to use only HTML5 and JavaScript (client and server side).

Our application will have very simple architecture – a proxy server written in Node.js and a client in HTML5 and JavaScript. The Node.js server will stay between the browser and the VNC server. We need it because the client-side JavaScript does not supports TCP sockets so we can’t connect directly to the VNC server. The HTML5 client will have a canvas on which we will draw the frames we receive from the server.
For VNC server you can use the free version of RealVNC.

First lets start with the server. Make sure you have node.js installed. We will use four node modules: rfb2, connect, socket.io and node-png.

 


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AoJ's comment, September 1, 2013 5:18 PM
wau
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JumpStart AngularJs

JumpStart AngularJs | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

This is a basic tutorial series to introduce Angular Js capabilities to absolute beginners. We will build a sample ELibrary module using angular through out the course. For advance users i will post a different series.

* BootStrap Application

* Model Binding

* Data Filters


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Kickstart Your AngularJS Development with Yeoman, Grunt and Bower

Kickstart Your AngularJS Development with Yeoman, Grunt and Bower | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

Whether you love or hate it, there’s no denying that AngularJS is the framework on every developer’s lips. It may not be for everybody, but AngularJS has a quirky, efficient and powerful feature set. Couple that with a few useful development tools like Yeoman, Grunt and Bower and you’ve got yourself an incredibly fast rapid prototyping process.

 

This AngularJS tutorial will cover:

* Generating a bare bones AngularJS app with Yeoman

* Using Grunt to speed up development and help perform repetitive tasks

* Using Bower to add third party plugins/frameworks

* Making minor changes to your AngularJS app


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An Absolute Beginner's Guide to Node.js

An Absolute Beginner's Guide to Node.js | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

There's no shortage of Node.js tutorials out there, but most of them cover specific use cases or topics that only apply when you've already got Node up and running. I see comments every once and awhile that sound something like, "I've downloaded Node, now what?" This tutorial answers that question and explains how to get started from the very beginning.


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Services (Part 6 of AngularJS from beginner to expert in 7 steps series)

Services (Part 6 of AngularJS from beginner to expert in 7 steps series) | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

We started our demonstrating the core components of the application and how to set up an AngularJS app. In the previous post, we covered the internals of directives in AngularJS.

In this section, we’ll tackle services, clean up our code, and finalize our audio player.

Throughout this tutorial series, we are building an NPR audio player that will show us the current stories on the showMorning Edition and play them in our browser. To see the fully finished demo, head over here.

Up until now, we’ve only concerned ourselves with how the view is tied to $scope and how the controller manages the data. For memory and performance purposes, controllers are instantiated only when they are needed and discarded when they are not. That means that every time we switch a route or reload a view (we’ll cover routing in the next post), the current controller gets tossed out.

Services provide a method for us to keep data around for the lifetime of the app and communicate across controllers in a consistent manner.


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Getting started with web components and polymer.js - II

Getting started with web components and polymer.js - II | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

This article describes still rarely supported Shadow DOM features. 

This article will describe things to improve the checkbox component, that got built up in the last article. By improving I mean making the web component more configurable and making it stylable from the “outside”. Additionally it will cover some mistakes that were made in first place, but let us just dive into it. ;)


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Ultimate guide to learning AngularJS in one day

Ultimate guide to learning AngularJS in one day | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

TerminologyAngular has a short term learning curve, and it's mainly getting to grips with the terminology and "thinking MVC". MVC meaning Model-View-Controller. Here are the higher level and essential APIs that Angular comes with and some terminology.

MVC

You've probably heard of MVC, used in many programming languages as a means of structuring/architecting applications/software. Here's a quick breakdown of meanings...

 

The key rule concept here is the $scope concept, which you'll tie to all your functions inside a specific controller. The $scope refers to the current element/area in the DOM (no, not the same as this), and encapsulates a very clever scoping capability that keeps data and logic completely scoped inside elements. It brings JavaScript public/private scoping to the DOM, which is fantastic.

The $scope concept may seem scary at first, but it's your way in to the DOM from the server (and static data if you have that too)! The demo gives you a basic idea of how you can 'push' data to the DOM.


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AngularJS + TypeScript : Controllers, Best Practice

Guidance around how you can write your Controllers when using AngularJS with TypeScript. 

--Things covered-- 
Dependency Injection 0:42 with minification 1:18
Using Class Members instead of Scope properties has following advantages: 
-Advantage: Class members : 3:50
-Advantage: Designer/Developer interaction contract 4:30 
-Advantage: Overcomming Scope inheritance 5:34
Summary 7:55


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The 80/20 Guide to Writing AngularJS Directives

The 80/20 Guide to Writing AngularJS Directives | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

For most of you, the reason that you’re writing directives is probably pretty straightforward, such as to integrate with existing Bootstrap modules and jQuery extensions, or to DRY up your UI. In this post, I’ll lay out the basic idea behind AngularJS directives, demonstrate what they do with roughly corresponding jQuery code, and provide you with enough knowledge to develop some pretty sophisticated directives.
At the highest level, a directive allows you to wire your custom UI components in to AngularJS’s two-way data-binding and scoping features, allowing you to define easily reusable ways for your users to view and interact with your underlying data. By default, a directive is a function that is run on every element with a particular attribute. This function takes as parameters the associated element and the AngularJS scope that this element is in. Let’s start out with an extremely simple example: setting the minimum height and width of an image while preserving its aspect ratio. There are several ways to do this, but the easiest is to make set the image as the background of a div using the following CSS...


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AngularJS Tutorial: Learn to Build Modern Web Apps

AngularJS Tutorial: Learn to Build Modern Web Apps | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

This tutorial will guide you through the process of creating a full-stack application. It features step-by-step instructions on how to build a fantasy football application, code snippets of the full application, and explanations on design decisions.

Our intention is to provide the AngularJS community with instructions on how to use AngularJS correctly and effectively, but also in its most modern form. The application you are building will go beyond basic use of AngularJS, and we will attempt to explore as much of the framework as possible. We also feel strongly about maintaining modernity in a tutorial, so we will keep it congruent with AngularJS as the framework and community matures. This tutorial is built on top of AngularJS v1.2.0rc1.

The tutorial is a living thing, a work in progress. We are constantly extending the tutorial and making changes and corrections. If you find errata, think something should be changed, or would like to suggest an improvement or new section, we would love to hear from you.


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Jan Hesse's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:54 AM

What a great walkthrough! Highly recommended!

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Developing with AngularJS - Part IV: Making it Pop

Developing with AngularJS - Part IV: Making it Pop | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

The last mile of development for the My Dashboard feature was to spice things up a bit and make it look better. We hired a design company to come up a new look and feel and they went to work. Within a week, we had a meeting with them and they presented a few different options. We picked the one we liked the best and went to work. Below are screenshots that I used to implement the new design.

The last feature I had to implement was the "Show More" bar that appears when widgets are hidden. This was the most difficult thing to implement and I tried many different things before arriving at a solution that works. First of all, the widgets bars that can be expanded are put into their original (collapsed) state using max-heightand overflow: hidden. From there, I look at the list inside the bar and compare the height's of the two elements. If the list is taller than the bar, the Show More bar is added.


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Maintaining and Organizing UI Dependencies with Knockout.JS: Part 1

Maintaining and Organizing UI Dependencies with Knockout.JS: Part 1 | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

We all know that the larger a project gets, the harder it is to maintain and organize UI dependencies. “What if the user does this, or this? That needs to change that and that.” This can be tough to deal with, especially when a different developer comes onto the project and doesn’t quite understand how you manually set up these dependencies.

Among the plethora of different Javascript libraries that help UI developers create responsive UIs, Knockout.JS has been a pleasure to work with. It knows what it needs to do to help you but also when to get out of the developer’s way.

Knockout aims to help with this by providing the developer with a way to “make elegant dependency tracking, declarative bindings, and be trivially extensible.” Knockout uses the MVVM (model-view-viewmodel) pattern, so if you’re familiar with any other MV* pattern, it should be easy to pick up on. The pattern allows developers to keep the logic in the Javascript and the HTML5 view is left solely to render the logic. What I’ve enjoyed the most about using Knockout.JS is that it makes the web page reactive to the user, like a native desktop app, easily.


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Part 2: Backbone.js Deconstructed

Part 2: Backbone.js Deconstructed | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

In part 2 of Backbone.js Deconstructed, we will be examining the meat of Backbone. The meat being Backbone, views, models, and collections. Equipped with the knowledge conveyed in part 1, you should be adequately prepared to get intimate withBackbone.View, Backbone.Model and Backbone.Collection constructors and corresponding object instances. Before we begin, I am going to lay out my strategy for discussing the meat.

While it is common that most efforts to teach Backbone start with learning about models, I actually think this prohibits learning. I believe once the peripheral parts are understood, the easiest path for grokking Backbone starts with the view. I strongly suggest a mastery of views before you attempt to populate a view with data (i.e. models or collections of models) and eventing the view to stay in sync with the data. The plan is to first examine views, then models, then collections in that order. Once each of these parts are understood, we will take this knowledge and use it to examine a small and contrived contact's application. Don't be afraid to examine the application first, In fact I recommend it, as it will give some a helpful context before reading sections 2, 3, and 4.

1 - Article Overview
2 - Backbone.View
3 - Backbone.Model
4 - Backbone.Collection
5 - Building A Simple Contacts Application
6 - Conclusion


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Testing node.js applications with Jasmine

Testing node.js applications with Jasmine | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

After a few episodes about testing your web frontend JavaScript code with Jasmine, we will show you how to test node.js applications with Jasmine today. We’ll use the excellent jasmine-node package to run unit tests from our console.

It’s even possible to run your tests automatically every time you save a file. In this screencast we will show you how!


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Modern JavaScript: Promises/A+ - understanding the spec through implementation

Modern JavaScript: Promises/A+ - understanding the spec through implementation | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

What we're going to do is create a promises/A+ implementation based on http://promises-aplus.github.io/promises-spec/. By doing this hopefully we'll get a deeper understanding of just how promises work.

according to the terminology a value can be anything including undefined and a reason is any value that indicates why a promise was rejected. That last definition is a little blurry - can "undefined" indicate why something was rejected? I'm going to say no and only accept non-null values. If anything doesn't work then I'll throw an error.


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JavaScript for Designers - An Intro to JS Terms and Concepts

JavaScript for Designers - An Intro to JS Terms and Concepts | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it

a humble 115 slides about JS and its programming patterns in a practical context


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Getting Started with KnockoutJS in ASP.NET MVC

Getting Started with KnockoutJS in ASP.NET MVC | Development on Various Platforms | Scoop.it
In this post we take a look at the slight mind shift that ASP.NET MVC developers working on JavaScript and jQuery face when they first start using KnockoutJS.

Knockout JS is a fantastic library when you are looking for a drop-in enhancement that brings in client side data-binding and elements of the MVVM design pattern into your website that’s a potpourri of Razor syntax, server side Html Helpers and jQuery plugins.

Well Knockout JS was built to bring meaning into this chaos, but before you get started, you have to detune yourself a bit. Let’s see what that means. By the way, this article assumes you have the KO cheat-sheet created by Sumit Maitra handy so that you can quickly lookup some of the syntax we throw around. Sumit has helped me a great deal in co-authoring this article and just like an AngularJS +  MVC series, we are planning to collaborate to do a KnockoutJS series too.


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