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How The Internet Is Killing The Planet…

How The Internet Is Killing The Planet… | Development geography | Scoop.it

The Internet can be a hazardous place to mingle around, and it’s apparent people are taking all the precautions they can to protect themselves and their children. However, personal safety isn’t the only concern when it comes to the Internet. There are far more areas where the Internet is causing some serious physical harm, maybe not directly, but to the environment and indirectly to us. When everything is about how “green” something is, it is not hard to understand that someone analyzed the Internet in that way.


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Environmental Education & Our Planet [Infographic]

Environmental Education & Our Planet [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it

Environmental Education and STEM: science, technology, engineering & math...

The environment is a compelling context for teaching and engaging today's students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)...


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Guns, Germs & Steel

Guns, Germs & Steel | Development geography | Scoop.it

This video (like the book with the same title) explores the course of human history to find the geographic factors that can help to explain the global inequalities between societies. Jared Diamond’s answer lies in the military strength (guns), superior pathogens (germs) and industrial production (steel) that agricultural societies were able to develop as the critical advantages over hunter/gatherer societies. The raw materials at the disposal of the societies inhabiting particular environments partially explain the economic possibilities before them. Diamond hypothesizes that the orientations of the continents play a critical role in the relative advantages among agricultural societies (East-West orientations allow for greater diffusion of agricultural technologies than North-South orientations since the growing seasons and ecology are more compatible), giving Eurasia an advantage over Africa and the Americas. The Fertile Crescent had native plant and animal species ideal for domestication, which then diffused to Europe. Societies that have more developed animal husbandry develop a resistance to more powerful germs. Consequently, when two societies come in contact those with the best resistance to the worse diseases are more successful. Similarly, industrial production depends on an agricultural surplus since specialization requires that some workers not needing to produce their own food to work on technological innovations. Societies that had agricultural advantages were able to invest in technologies (primarily steel) that would enhance their advantages over other societies, as seen during colonization. Societies that had the best environments had access to large plant eating mammals suitable for domestication and the most productive grains would be poised to produce more dangerous guns, germs and steel—the key resources for economic dominion resulting in global inequalities.


Diamond’s critics argue that the ‘geography hypothesis’ is environmental determinism that does not properly value human choices into the equation. Still, the core of this book is the search for connections between the themes of Geography with a spatial framework and the video is available via Netflix, public libraries and many other outlets.


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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Development geography | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      


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Infographic: The metals that make our technology are running out

Infographic: The metals that make our technology are running out | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic by Camden Asay shows that we're fast running out of the stuff that powers our vehicles and our weaponry. But we've got even less time left with our gadgets. Yttrium and indium, two of the rare-earth elements that enable us to have TVs, computer monitors, and touch screens -- oh, and solar panels -- are on a fast track to complete depletion. At our current rate of use, we have less than 15 years' worth left. Of course, we'll probably become a little more efficient at deploying these resources ... but at our modern levels of demand for technology, efficiency really only postpones the inevitable...


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Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC]

Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC] | Development geography | Scoop.it
This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet's supply of Rare Earth Elements.

Apple sold a record 5 million iPhones the first weekend the phone was on the market. And unlike in the iPhone’s early days, the latest Apple smartphones are not primarily being purchased by first time owners.

But did you ever stop to think about what happens to all those iPhone 3, 3GS, 4 and 4Ss now deemed out of date? While there are many recycling programs available, most smartphones are not efficiently thrown out.

Apple’s iPhones is far from the only culprit — most every smartphone, hard drive, hybrid car, satellite, MRI machine and GPS, along with dozens of other tech gadgets, are made from Rare Earth Elements.

This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet’s supply of rare earth elements...


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UK 'saturated' by light pollution

UK 'saturated' by light pollution | Development geography | Scoop.it
More than half of the UK population cannot see the stars clearly because of light pollution, campaigners say.

 

Another impact of modern technology, urbanization and living in affluent consumer-driven societies. 


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