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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:39 AM

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:51 PM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | Development geography | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


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Dan Barber: How I fell in love with a fish

Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu.

 

This is a compelling analysis of the agricultural food system through the case-study of fish farms.  If we fish the seas like we clear-cut forests, the biodiversity of the world's waters will be seriously depleted.  That has been the economic model for fishing for hundreds of years and it is obviously not sustainable given the growing population and demand for fish.   However, not all "sustainable" fish farming businesses are equal, and this TED talk demonstrates some of the best practices to restructure the food industry for the best food and environmental results.


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EnviroJMS's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:29 AM

This is an interesting video on sustainable fish farming, it might be helpful to someone who wants to write about sustainable farming. Apologies, it is quite long

 

Aleksandre da Silva

 

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Sustainability explained through animation

Watch this short animated movie explaining sustainability created for RealEyes by Igloo Animations...

 


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Climate Change and Sustainability

Climate Change and Sustainability | Development geography | Scoop.it

I'll let the comic (by Pulitzer cartoonist Joel Pett) speak for itself. 


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Mr. David Burton's comment, April 16, 2012 6:19 PM
That's funny!
Seth Dixon's comment, April 16, 2012 7:01 PM
Too funny to keep to myself.
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Sustainable Urbanism

http://www.ted.com Jaime Lerner reinvented urban space in his native Curitiba, Brazil. Along the way, he changed the way city planners worldwide see whats po...

 

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  To see an trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swQTTG3NcYY


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 5:02 AM

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  Click here to see the trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 8:47 AM

This video is enlightening.  The speaker uses the city as a model for fixing problems in the world.  Instead of seeing the city as an enemy to environmentalism, he purposes changing the cities and reworking old sites like quarries into something that is useable today.  He also advocates the integration of the transportation systems to make commuting more feasible as well as less pollution generating. 

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Development geography | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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What is strong sustainability?

What is strong sustainability? | Development geography | Scoop.it

The concept of strong sustainability is based on the scientific fact that all human life and activity occurs within the limitations of planet Earth, or the 'biosphere' where humankind lives, including all societal functions, such as the economy.

 

It is a self-evident truth that without a functioning biosphere there can be no society or 'sociosphere', and without a sociosphere there can be no societal functions, including an economy or 'econosphere'.


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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Development geography | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 6:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 12:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 5:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
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Dan Barber: How I fell in love with a fish

Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu.

 

This is a compelling analysis of the agricultural food system through the case-study of fish farms.  If we fish the seas like we clear-cut forests, the biodiversity of the world's waters will be seriously depleted.  That has been the economic model for fishing for hundreds of years and it is obviously not sustainable given the growing population and demand for fish.   However, not all "sustainable" fish farming businesses are equal, and this TED talk demonstrates some of the best practices to restructure the food industry for the best food and environmental results.


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EnviroJMS's curator insight, September 18, 2013 4:29 AM

This is an interesting video on sustainable fish farming, it might be helpful to someone who wants to write about sustainable farming. Apologies, it is quite long

 

Aleksandre da Silva

 

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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:49 AM

A very insightful video into the organic farming movement. Chipotle is taking a leap into spreading the word about this, and personally I find it enlightening. It is nice to see such a widely known restaurant take in interest in the food they serve and it makes it seem like they care about their customers. When you eat at Chiptole, you know what you are eating, but with other fast food places you can't be sure exactly what went into making that hamburger. They want people to see that they can get organic food made fast and it still tastes good. Chipotle is starting a consumption cultural revolution. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:57 AM

This video, although it is a Chipotle Grill advertisment, does make a clear point. The industrialization of agriculture has made our food unhealthy and has taken away jobs from the farmer. Although we are a highly industrialized and developed nation today, it is still necessary for our necessary food to be naturally grown on farms rather than in factories where it was not meant to be grown. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:13 PM

What this commercial is trying to make aware is that there are ethics involved in agriculture. What the organic farming movement is all about is providing good for people that is produced fresh and no harm is done to the animals or environment .

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The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:02 PM

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

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Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests

Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests | Development geography | Scoop.it
A new global survey suggests world's the most wasteful countries feel the least guilty—and vice-versa.

 

Our consumption patterns, ecological footprint and lifestyle choices have a significant impact on how we feel about sustainability initiatives and human/environmental interactions.  


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Seth D.'s comment, September 4, 2012 5:27 AM
This article explains about America being the least green in the world when it comes to transportation, etc. Things are being done which can bring a good impact to our environment like cleaner gasoline or cars that are run on electricity like the hybrid cars that you see in the commercials on TV. But, there's also a few other ways to make a good impact on the environment like riding a bicycle to work for take public transportation or walk to places you want to go to. Not only we can get good exercise by walking or riding a bicycle but you can reduce the emmissions in the air form your own car. When it comes to food, Americans can start eating vegetables to make a good impact on the environment.