Development geogr...
Follow
Find tag "pollution"
838 views | +0 today
Development geography
Investigating global inequality
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

US Carbon Footprint Dominates…Because of Spam

US Carbon Footprint Dominates…Because of Spam | Development geography | Scoop.it
In the world of environmental pollution there are three big players; the US, India, and China. Currently leading the race...the U.S. And it may be for a reason that you have never thought of.

It’s been a known fact that the U.S. has dominated the tech industry for some time, and while they have brought many inspirational innovations to protect our environment and advance our efficiency, the technology sector could be responsible for our large carbon footprint caused by spam emails...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dhaka: fastest growing megacity in the world

A five-part, multimedia series on the coming dystopia that is urbanization.

 

This is a great introduction to the explosion of the slums within megacities.  This video as a part of the article is especially useful.   Click on the title to read the accompanying article.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 11:21 AM

I recently did a project on the topic of megacities in the past, present, and future and how the natural risks they posed.  In past decades there was Tokyo, New York City, or even Mexico City.  I also covered present cities such as Shangai and Los Angeles to name a few.  The city that basically topped the growth charts in my statistics was Dhaka.  The city literally is growing like a chia pet, but with no direct plan or proper use of land.  According to future calculations, the city of Dhaka can reach roughly 23 million by 2025, that's about 600,000 new people coming in every year up until that point.  This video is just an example of how poorly planned this megacity is, and what the future holds for all of the people living there.  It's simply chaos.  There are already squatter settlements and unorganized living conditions for the current residents, picturing the population to grow even more is outrageous!

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:43 AM

The city of Dhaka has experienced a massivie boom in population. Both the rich and the poor are flowing into this city causing many problems that all complain the government is ignoring instead of fixing. The city is very inefficient, with traffic so bad that it is costing the city millions of dollars. There are frequent water shortages resulting in protests in the streets. There is much infrastructure throughout the city as well. But it is also represents a sense of hope to the people that are coming in and moving into the slums, that with the better jobs and money they will be able to get they can better provide for themselves or their family.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 8:23 PM

Dhaka is the fastest growing city in the world, as rich and poor people move to the city everyday. So many poor people are moving here due to the fact there is no other place worth living in Bangladesh. The city is facing many problems, such as lack of traffic signals, minimal clean drinking water for residents and horrible housing for many people. However, some feel the city’s slums offer the best chance for an improved life.   

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests

Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests | Development geography | Scoop.it
A new global survey suggests world's the most wasteful countries feel the least guilty—and vice-versa.

 

Our consumption patterns, ecological footprint and lifestyle choices have a significant impact on how we feel about sustainability initiatives and human/environmental interactions.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth D.'s comment, September 4, 2012 5:27 AM
This article explains about America being the least green in the world when it comes to transportation, etc. Things are being done which can bring a good impact to our environment like cleaner gasoline or cars that are run on electricity like the hybrid cars that you see in the commercials on TV. But, there's also a few other ways to make a good impact on the environment like riding a bicycle to work for take public transportation or walk to places you want to go to. Not only we can get good exercise by walking or riding a bicycle but you can reduce the emmissions in the air form your own car. When it comes to food, Americans can start eating vegetables to make a good impact on the environment.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Development geography | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Industrial Environmental Disasters

Industrial Environmental Disasters | Development geography | Scoop.it
It's not two photos stitched together, and it's not an installation. This red line is the stain of toxic sludge.

 

This is a great issue that highlights the human-environmental interactions theme.  In 2011, this site in Hungary witnessed a horrific toxic sludge spill at an aluminum oxide plant that literally created a toxic mudslide. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 22, 2012 6:47 AM
such a horrible scene, just another footprint we've stomped into the earth