Development geogr...
Follow
Find tag "infographic"
830 views | +0 today
Development geography
Investigating global inequality
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.

 

It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.

 

Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

US Carbon Footprint Dominates…Because of Spam

US Carbon Footprint Dominates…Because of Spam | Development geography | Scoop.it
In the world of environmental pollution there are three big players; the US, India, and China. Currently leading the race...the U.S. And it may be for a reason that you have never thought of.

It’s been a known fact that the U.S. has dominated the tech industry for some time, and while they have brought many inspirational innovations to protect our environment and advance our efficiency, the technology sector could be responsible for our large carbon footprint caused by spam emails...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: What's the Environmental Impact of a T-shirt? | Ecouterre

Infographic: What's the Environmental Impact of a T-shirt? | Ecouterre | Development geography | Scoop.it
Textile-recycling firm USAgain has drawn up an infographic that outlines the environmental impact of a single T-shirt.

USAgain is celebrating World Environment Day by getting back to basics—and we do mean basics. The textile-recycling firm has drawn up an infographic that outlines the environmental impact of the most common item of clothing: the T-shirt...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: How Big is Your Pile of Coal?

Infographic: How Big is Your Pile of Coal? | Development geography | Scoop.it
We all know that when we flip a light switch on the wall, illuminating a lamp on the ceiling as if by magic, it's not magic.

There's a long and extremely complex series of events that makes that little action possible, and, for many of us across the country, it begins in a coal fired power plant.

If you're one of the millions of Americans whose home is powered by coal, you may have wondered: just how much coal does it take to supply electricity to my house?

Our friends over at EnergySavvy have a great new infographic that explains how much coal it takes to provide air conditioning to an average home in the Southeastern U.S., compared to the amount of coal required to cool that same home with a more energy efficient air conditioning system; and then to cool that same home after it's been given a home performance upgrade (which includes adding insulation, air sealing, duct sealing, and other low cost measures)...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Solar Power's Limitless Possibilities

Infographic: Solar Power's Limitless Possibilities | Development geography | Scoop.it

An intriguing look at just how much clean, renewable energy we could harvest from the sun...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic]

Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it
Although 'moving season' — mid-May through mid-Sept. — is behind us, the folks at MyMove.com have some thoughts on how to haul all of your worldly possessions from points A to B with minimal eco-impact.

Via Flora Moon, Lauren Moss
more...
Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 5:38 AM

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Sustainable Futures

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | Development geography | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 12:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers | Development geography | Scoop.it
2010 Poverty Rate: 15.1%, 46.2 million people in poverty.

Here are the numbers behind the face of poverty in America.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Life on Less Than $2 a Day

Infographic: Life on Less Than $2 a Day | Development geography | Scoop.it
A global snapshot of the cost of survival in several developing nations...

Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Mind your textile waste: Infographic

Mind your textile waste: Infographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Here's the skinny on trash trends: Of the roughly 13 million tons of textiles tossed each year, only about 15% are recovered for reuse or recycling.

Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Environmental Education & Our Planet [Infographic]

Environmental Education & Our Planet [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it

Environmental Education and STEM: science, technology, engineering & math...

The environment is a compelling context for teaching and engaging today's students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Why Reuse A Cup?

Infographic: Why Reuse A Cup? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Headed out to grab a cup of coffee this morning? Make sure you grab a reusable mug, too. If you think it doesn't really matter, think again.

According to this neat infographic, Americans use a whopping 25 billion paper cups each year! That adds up to 363 billion pounds of waste and the loss of more than 9 billion trees.

Bottom line: Every little cup adds up. Do your part to save trees, reduce pollution and minimize waste by bringing a reusable mug with you this morning — and don't forget to grab your reusable water bottle before you head out to lunch...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: How many tons of waste goes to landfills in Britain..?

Infographic: How many tons of waste goes to landfills in Britain..? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Britain is beginning to do its bit when it comes to the environment but there are still millions of tonnes of waste being dumped here every year... 

Mat Crocker, head of illegals and waste at the Environment Agency, said: ‘We can’t keep putting waste in the ground indefinitely because there is limited capacity left in England and Wales. 

‘But the good news is that we are taking recycling and reusing more seriously.’

He said more than 40 per cent of household waste was recycled in England last year, compared to just 11 per cent ten years ago. ‘Increased recycling means that the amount of waste we send to landfill has been reduced by nearly half over the past decade,’ he added...

More details at the infographic link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Development geography | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:06 AM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:26 PM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Development geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 7:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 4:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:50 AM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 5:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 20, 2013 10:30 PM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture