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An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.

 

It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.

 

Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...


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Power Consumption Facts in the U.S.

Power Consumption Facts in the U.S. | Development geography | Scoop.it
Infographic on power consumption facts in the U.S.

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Global Warning? | Visual.ly

Global Warning? | Visual.ly | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic explores the two sides of the ever growing debate on global warming and who is causing it. This infographic provides information for the argument most scientists give and the argument made by skeptics to determine what is more valid and the effects that could happen if we don't do anything about global warming.


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Human Development Index: how does your country compare?

Human Development Index: how does your country compare? | Development geography | Scoop.it

The Human Development Index has been released today - see how it compares each country. Click on each country to get the data - or the dropdown menu to see the map change...


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The ironic nature of the world’s food crisis

The ironic nature of the world’s food crisis | Development geography | Scoop.it
EVEN AS we’ve officially reached 7 billion souls on our planet, more than 14% are still chronically malnourished.

And while analysts spend precious time calculating how much more food should be produced to feed the hungry, and thoughtful citizens update their Facebook statuses for an hour to “help eradicate World Hunger,” food prices are slowly increasing and soils are becoming poorer, yielding fewer crops every year.


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Jessica Martel's curator insight, April 29, 2013 1:11 PM

There are many ways our country alone can help the food shortage in the world. Then you stop and think.. there are poeple still starving in the US.

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Which nations are really responsible for climate change - interactive

Which nations are really responsible for climate change - interactive | Development geography | Scoop.it
There are many ways to view the world's carbon emissions: by national totals or emissions per person; by current carbon output or historical emissions; by production of greenhouse gases or consumption of goods and services; by absolute emissions or economic carbon intensity.

Our interactive map allows you to browse all of these different measurements, each of which provides a different insight. Together they highlight the complexity of divvying up responsibility for climate change and highlight some of the tensions at the heart of the global climate negotiations.


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Our Global Footprint

Our Global Footprint | Development geography | Scoop.it

All of us depend on nature to live. In some ways, Earth’s bounty is like a bank account, which is recharged, for instance by sun-powered plant growth. Against this account, we—as individuals, as nations, and as a global community—are constantly making withdrawals.

But as human numbers and activities increase, we spend more and more against nature’s account. Are we withdrawing at a rate that exceeds nature’s ability to recharge this account? Are we able to maintain a positive balance?


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A Core Set of Global Environmental Indicators

A Core Set of Global Environmental Indicators | Development geography | Scoop.it

To cut a long story short, if you leave below sea level or happen to be a polar bear, it’s time to pack up and move...


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How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context?

How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Although the U.S. only comprises 5% of the the world’s population, we consume 20% of the world’s energy. Does this make you, as an American citizen, 20 times worse than the average Indian, 4 times worse than the average Brazilian and twice as bad as the average German? Or does it mean you live, work and play that much harder? Take a look and see what you see...


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The Two Sides of the World Food Crisis

The Two Sides of the World Food Crisis | Development geography | Scoop.it

Of all the issues facig the planet, few seem more urgent than the global food shortage. Sufficient food- our single most vital need as living creatures- eludes the grasp of nearly 1 billion people, a problem that may worsen as population rises.


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Interactive graphic shows just how few resources are left

Interactive graphic shows just how few resources are left | Development geography | Scoop.it

Scientific American has put together an interactive feature where you can watch resources disappear before your very eyes. The dates for when things will "run out" are a little fuzzy -- they've got animals pretty much running out five minutes from now, even though they're endangered but not extinct. But there are informative videos, and it's interesting to see how resources will dwindle over time.


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Intro to Energy: A Global Picture

Intro to Energy: A Global Picture | Development geography | Scoop.it
A global picture of energy supply, demand, and trends.

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Top 10 Countries for Solar Power (Infographic)

Top 10 Countries for Solar Power (Infographic) | Development geography | Scoop.it

Here's our fun infographic of the week, on the top 10 countries for solar power, based on installed solar power capacity:Most striking stats, to me:1) 43% of the world's solar is installed in Germany!


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Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Fossil-fuel subsidies are a growing fiscal burden that encourage wasteful consumption. See which countries have the largest subsidies around the world.

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Click on the link for the interactive global map...


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Ollie Metcalfe's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:59 PM

Shows for fossil fuels, as well as having detrimental effects on the atmosphere also have a devastating effect on country's economy's by requiring the use of subsidies