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Development geography
Investigating global inequality
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'Sharp drop' in India poverty

'Sharp drop' in India poverty | Development geography |
Poverty in India has dropped sharply thanks to increased spending on rural welfare programmes, the country's Planning Commission says.


KV: Government intervention has decrease poverty in rural India. More people are getting out of poverty in rural areas than urban areas. Programs funded by the government to help the poor has significantly changed many lives. People are given education, welfare, and proper sanitation. Once assistance is provided to the poor, the welfare and well being drastically changes for the better. As the Indian government prospers because of new business ventures, some of the increased revenue should be set aside to help many regions that are affected by poverty.


SD: For more resources on population, see this scoopit topic on the environment and society by KV.

Via Seth Dixon
luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 10:19 AM
La pobreza es el càncer de la sociedad humana, ojalà sea posible reducirla, aunque soy escèptico, el dinero es muy sabroso y los pocos que lo tienen no lo sueltan, de allì las revoluciones, guerras ect.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:56 PM

Poverty in rural India has declined drastically, and much faster then in urban India. The decline is due to increased spending on rural welfare programmes, and rural poverty fell by 8% while urban poverty fell by 4.8%. I think this is great that the government is finally taking action and helping their people, instead of just 'sweeping them under the rug' in a way and pretending the issue isnt there.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 11:26 AM

This is yet another sign that India is developing into a great world power. The government has sought to curb the rates of rural poverty by instituting social welfare programs.  The programs are designed to provide those living in the rural areas of the nation, with education and proper sanitation. These programs appear to be succeeding, as a sharp drop has occurred in rural poverty. The governments recognition of the poverty issue is a major step towards tackling the major inequities in Indian society. Largely a legacy of the caste system, Indian society is still terribly divided along socio-economic lines. In order for Indian to achieve the status of a developed nation, the government must take action to bridge this inequities. An new  society based on equality may be on the horizon in India.

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Streetcar Plans Plow Ahead

Streetcar Plans Plow Ahead | Development geography |
Cities from Los Angeles to Atlanta are making big bets to revitalize their downtowns by bringing back a form of transportation many abandoned decades ago: the streetcar.


The streetcar was a staple in urban development projects generations ago and was subsequently abandoned.  Many mid-sized cities today (and a few large ones) are returning to that 'outdated' mode of transportation and hoping that streetcar stops will encourage businesses to open shop in those neighborhoods. 

Via Seth Dixon
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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Development geography |

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.

Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Gendered Differences in Development

Gendered Differences in Development | Development geography |

Being a woman can be much more difficult, based on where you live. 


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The global debt clock

The global debt clock | Development geography |
Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.


Tags: Economic, currency, visualization.

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Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:06 PM
Remember when we used to talk about the 3rd-world debt being a problem? (Back when the term 3rd world was actually not politically incorrect...) Well, this map clearly shows, debt is a 1st-world problem now...

Awesome map Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:42 AM

Welcome to Investors Europe Mauritius Stock Brokers

@investorseurope Online Trading Paradigm

@offshorebroker Nominee Trading Accounts ;

Download Offshore Trading DEMO:

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The Separatist Map of Africa

The Separatist Map of Africa | Development geography |
When African states gained independence, the continent's new leaders agreed to respect the old colonial borders to avoid endless wars.


This interactive map shows the major conflicts on the African continent where the combatants have geopolitical aspirations to separate from the state and create a new, autonomous state.  Click on the red arrows and you can read about the warring factions and the current situation in that region.   


Tags: political, governance, Africa, unit 4 political, war, conflict, states, colonialism.

Via Seth Dixon
Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Unit IV - Non American

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:04 AM

is sad to see how people just refer to it as "Africa" when every part has its own name. Even myself don't know many of them since they are irrelevant for the western people.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:08 AM

This interactive map does a great job of not only showing the sate of political struggles and military conflict within the whole of Africa. This shows the new countries many dissidents  and rebels wish to establish in order to give their people a cultural and ethnic home land. This give a good picture of simply how chaotic some parts of Africa truly are and how destabilized many regions are. 

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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | Development geography |
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.


This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 


Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    


Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 

Via Seth Dixon
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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Development geography |

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."

Via Seth Dixon
Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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In the Shadows of the High Line

In the Shadows of the High Line | Development geography |
The High Line has become a tourist-clogged catwalk and a catalyst for some of the most rapid gentrification in the city’s history.


Earlier I have posted about the High Line, a project in NYC to transform an old elevated train line into a public green space. This project has fallen under criticism as the property values of homes below the High Line have risen and the neighborhood is undergoing gentrification. Linked is the NYTimes opinion article that critiques the High Line as a “Disneyfied tourist-clogged catwalk.” This project has change the economic profile of the neighborhood and its sense of place and communal identity. The critic’s blog is (self-described) “a bitterly nostalgic look at a city in the process of going extinct,” so he is naturally going to be against anything that at changes the historic character of the city. As geographer Matthew Hartzell has said, “to say that nothing should change is an awfully conservative view of urbanity. Cities evolve—neighborhoods evolve.” This is a good article to share with students to get them to think about the economic and cultural issues associated with urban revitalization projects and the impacts they have on the city.

Via Seth Dixon
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, February 19, 2014 10:59 AM

This is a scary article to read, as I find it immensely relevant to an issue that is very clearly here in Providence as well. In studying the impacts of Water Fire on Providence in a class here at RIC we spoke of talking points that the city could use to attract high end investment. It's become increasingly apparent that this sort of investment is the last thing my city, or any other city, needs. This project could have served New Yorkers as opposed to tourists and the elite, but it hasn't. As someone who wants to head into the field of urban planning and community revitalization I must be aware and keep thinking ahead. What will my project do for a community? Will it make it stronger or completely decimate it.?

James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 6:07 PM

(North America topic 4)
I was surprised to find out how projects such as the High Line could raise strong oppositional viewpoints. Before looking into this topic it seemed like an all-around beneficial project. Delving deeper, however, the unseen consequences of revitalization and gentrification (2 major keywords right there!) become more apparent. Also at this level it is important to note that what is "good" vs. "bad" becomes much less objective, but rather mainly subjective and viewable in many different lights.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 25, 2014 5:55 PM

I found this article extremely insightful, a first hand account of how gentrification affects the lives of those who witness their community changing to suit the needs of people who can bring revenue in for the city. Also it shows how well-intentioned grassroots efforts to improve a neighborhood can be high jack by those who see the potential to make money. In the beginning the idea to take this unused high line and convert it into a public green space seemed like a terrific way to take the landscape of the neighborhood and convert it into a public good that reflected the community in which it existed. The railway was covered in graffiti with a "wild urban meadow", if I lived in that community I would have supported making it a public space because it showed my communities creativity and culture. Unfortunately, the policy makers in NYC saw a way to bring tourist in with a new trendy hot spot. They covered the graffiti, erasing the communities imprint on the high line. The NYC government used the walk way as a means to increase revenue and in doing so they over crowded the neighborhood making no room for those who were already living under the rail. What is even more striking is that these gentrification efforts even lead to the rezoning of West Chelsea so they could build luxury developments and destroy existing buildings. This public space started out as a great communal asset that was perverted through gentrification.

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The Geography of Charitable Giving

Ever wonder how charitable the people are who live in your area? It turns out that lower-income people tend to donate a much bigger share of their discretionary incomes than wealthier people, according to a new study.


Questions to ponder: What are some reasons that Providence RI is the 'least charitable' metropolitan area in the United States according to this data?  Why is the state of Utah ranked as the 'most charitable state?'  Why are the bottom 3 states all in the New England region? 

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | Development geography |
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...


Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 

Via Seth Dixon
Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Development geography |

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 


Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.

Via Seth Dixon
Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

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‘Forgotten Neighborhood’ Underscores Growing Poverty of Gaza

‘Forgotten Neighborhood’ Underscores Growing Poverty of Gaza | Development geography |
A United Nations report cites widespread shortages of food, water, electricity, jobs, hospital beds and classrooms amid an exploding population in an area of Gaza.


While most slums are symptomatic of issues that would be addressed by an economic and urban geography analysis, the slums of Gaza are different.  Many slum issues are tied to city politics, but in Gaza these slums are also connected to some of the larger geopolitical issues of the region.  


Tags: Political, urban, squatter, poverty, MiddleEast, economic, place, unit 4 political, unit 7 cities.

Via Seth Dixon
Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 13, 2013 7:03 PM

People in the Gaza strip are already fearful Israel around them because of the fighting between the two areas. When people think of Gaza, they think of the Palestine-Israel conflict, but there is much more going on in Gaza. Israel blocks Gaza off from all forms of trade, and although they have a tunnel between them and Egypt, it is not enough. Therefore, there are slums where children do not go to school because their parents cannot afford it, people starve because they have no money to buy food, and people live in small shelters that they built out of some materials they put together and sleep on the ground. This is a squatter community, and, as the article states, there are squatter communities in worse shape, the problem here is that everyone is pointing fingers and no one is trying to fix the problem. Many state that Israel has caused this poverty because of their oppressive control of the area and others state that it is Gaza's government because they are corrupt and new and cannot or do not distribute their food well. This is a problem, but when no one takes the blame, innocent people suffer.

Jasmine GreenTea's curator insight, February 24, 2014 11:27 AM

Parents in Gaza are not sending their children to school because they have either no money for books, school fees or materials for their school. In Gaza, there is an exploding population in an area and also, people are living in slum conditions and there is a widespread of shortage of food, water, electricity, jobs, hospital beds and classrooms. The fact that the people in Gaza, slaughter lame horses and uses its meat for kebabs because they could not afford beef or lamb, extended my thinking in new directions.

The population of people who are more fortunate is definitely more than those people who are living in poverty. Therefore, I wonder why are those people who are fortunate, not willing to lend a helping hand to these people in Gaza who are living in such bad conditions.

Kayla, Sean, and Max's curator insight, February 24, 1:37 PM


As the population of "The Forgotten Neighborhood" continues to grow exponentially, living conditions only continue to get worse and worse. People go without food, water, or basic services, making the conditions there practically unlivable. Due to corruption and mismanagement, much of the aid sent there to help gets used elsewhere, which causes living conditions to stay poor.

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Developed inations slow world growth - The Nation

Developed inations slow world growth - The Nation | Development geography |
The agency concludes that global economies will perform better with more even income distribution and that reducing inequality through fiscal and income policies is crucial to growth and development.
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