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Mind your textile waste: Infographic

Mind your textile waste: Infographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Here's the skinny on trash trends: Of the roughly 13 million tons of textiles tossed each year, only about 15% are recovered for reuse or recycling.

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Infographic: What's the Environmental Impact of a T-shirt? | Ecouterre

Infographic: What's the Environmental Impact of a T-shirt? | Ecouterre | Development geography | Scoop.it
Textile-recycling firm USAgain has drawn up an infographic that outlines the environmental impact of a single T-shirt.

USAgain is celebrating World Environment Day by getting back to basics—and we do mean basics. The textile-recycling firm has drawn up an infographic that outlines the environmental impact of the most common item of clothing: the T-shirt...


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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Development geography | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


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Infographic: Understanding Carbon Offsets

Infographic: Understanding Carbon Offsets | Development geography | Scoop.it
With only 13 percent of carbon emissions naturally sequestered a year, the concept of offsets is meant to lessen our growing carbon footprint.

When we exhale, we release carbon dioxide into the air around us. That carbon dioxide is naturally removed from the atmosphere by plants and the ocean in what is known as the carbon cycle. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s, human activities like burning coal and cutting down forests have thrown off the carbon cycle's delicate balance.

Take a look at our latest infographic to see why the concept for carbon offsets were first created.


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Using Infographics to Educate the World About Human Rights

Using Infographics to Educate the World About Human Rights | Development geography | Scoop.it
As individuals, we may disagree on many issues, from philosophy to politics, to what constitutes proper nutrition. But if there is one topic everyone recognizes as tremendously important, it’s that everyone is entitled to basic human rights.

One of the biggest challenges to getting people the rights they deserve as human beings, however, is awareness. And many human rights activist organizations have turned to visualization to help inform the public about issues going on in the world. At Visual.ly, we recognize this struggle to inform, so we’ve decided to open up a Human Rights topic on our newly redesigned site. This topic will provide a place for people to educate themselves about many of the humanitarian movements around the planet. To help kick off the category and raise awareness, here are 12 visualizations about humanitarian issues...


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ONE | INFOGRAPHIC: Closing the gender gap in land rights

ONE | INFOGRAPHIC: Closing the gender gap in land rights | Development geography | Scoop.it

Although women play an indispensable role in the rural economy, they face severe constraints in accessing the agricultural assets and services they need to maximize their production. It has become increasingly clear that there is a “gender gap” in resources such as land, technology, and extension services; that the gap imposes costs not only on women but also on the broader economy and society; and that closing the gap would improve agricultural productivity and reduce hunger and poverty. Oft-cited statistics from a recent FAO report focus on the gains that could be made if women had equal access to non-land resources. In light of evidence that secure rights to land for women can increase agricultural productivity and confer other household benefits, we at Landesa think it is critical to consider what additional gains could be made if women had equal access to one of the most important assets to agricultural households: land.


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Infographic: Why Reuse A Cup?

Infographic: Why Reuse A Cup? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Headed out to grab a cup of coffee this morning? Make sure you grab a reusable mug, too. If you think it doesn't really matter, think again.

According to this neat infographic, Americans use a whopping 25 billion paper cups each year! That adds up to 363 billion pounds of waste and the loss of more than 9 billion trees.

Bottom line: Every little cup adds up. Do your part to save trees, reduce pollution and minimize waste by bringing a reusable mug with you this morning — and don't forget to grab your reusable water bottle before you head out to lunch...


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Infographic: How many tons of waste goes to landfills in Britain..?

Infographic: How many tons of waste goes to landfills in Britain..? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Britain is beginning to do its bit when it comes to the environment but there are still millions of tonnes of waste being dumped here every year... 

Mat Crocker, head of illegals and waste at the Environment Agency, said: ‘We can’t keep putting waste in the ground indefinitely because there is limited capacity left in England and Wales. 

‘But the good news is that we are taking recycling and reusing more seriously.’

He said more than 40 per cent of household waste was recycled in England last year, compared to just 11 per cent ten years ago. ‘Increased recycling means that the amount of waste we send to landfill has been reduced by nearly half over the past decade,’ he added...

More details at the infographic link.


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Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC]

Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC] | Development geography | Scoop.it
This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet's supply of Rare Earth Elements.

Apple sold a record 5 million iPhones the first weekend the phone was on the market. And unlike in the iPhone’s early days, the latest Apple smartphones are not primarily being purchased by first time owners.

But did you ever stop to think about what happens to all those iPhone 3, 3GS, 4 and 4Ss now deemed out of date? While there are many recycling programs available, most smartphones are not efficiently thrown out.

Apple’s iPhones is far from the only culprit — most every smartphone, hard drive, hybrid car, satellite, MRI machine and GPS, along with dozens of other tech gadgets, are made from Rare Earth Elements.

This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet’s supply of rare earth elements...


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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | Development geography | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Development geography | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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OECD – Your Better Life Index

OECD – Your Better Life Index | Development geography | Scoop.it
Your Better Life Index by the OECD shows how countries perform according to the importance you give to the 11 topics – like education, housing, environment, and so on – that contribute to well-being.

 

This is an excellent data visualization tool.  It compiles data from different countries (jobs, housing, medical, worker safety, etc.) and based on how YOU rank the factors, it compares the standard of living in these selected countries.  An excellent resource for a unit on development (plus, doing this shows students how cultural values and choices are a part of measurements such as the Human Development Index).  The raw data for this is found at: http://www.oecd.org/document/0,3746,en_2649_201185_46462759_1_1_1_1,00.html


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Infographic: Trash and Recycling Trends

Infographic: Trash and Recycling Trends | Development geography | Scoop.it

Ever wondered how much trash you create over the course of a year? The amount may surprise you! This infographic to show you the dirty details on just how much garbage is generated and recycled across the globe...


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Sustainable Development - Infographic: Inclusive Green Growth

Sustainable Development - Infographic: Inclusive Green Growth | Development geography | Scoop.it
Why is inclusive green growth necessary?

The world's population is predicted to reach 9 billion people by 2050, and they will all need food, water, and energy to survive. Our current growth patterns are highly inefficient and stand in the way of truly sustainable development. The way forward is inclusive green growth that is clean in its treatment of the environment, efficient in its use of natural resources, resilient, and meets the needs of all people.


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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 17, 2012 7:50 AM
this is great
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Environmental Education & Our Planet [Infographic]

Environmental Education & Our Planet [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it

Environmental Education and STEM: science, technology, engineering & math...

The environment is a compelling context for teaching and engaging today's students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)...


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Breathing Earth: CO2 rates by country in real-time

Breathing Earth: CO2 rates by country in real-time | Development geography | Scoop.it
A visual real-time simulation that displays the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, birth rates, and death rates of every country in the world.

Breathing Earth, a real-time simulation displays the CO2 emissions of every country in the world, as well as their birth and death rates.
Although the CO2 emission, birth rate and death rate data used in Breathing Earth comes from reputable sources, data that measures things on such a massive scale can never be 100% accurate. Please note however that the CO2 emission levels shown here are much more likely to be too low than they are to be too high...


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Infographic: How Big is Your Pile of Coal?

Infographic: How Big is Your Pile of Coal? | Development geography | Scoop.it
We all know that when we flip a light switch on the wall, illuminating a lamp on the ceiling as if by magic, it's not magic.

There's a long and extremely complex series of events that makes that little action possible, and, for many of us across the country, it begins in a coal fired power plant.

If you're one of the millions of Americans whose home is powered by coal, you may have wondered: just how much coal does it take to supply electricity to my house?

Our friends over at EnergySavvy have a great new infographic that explains how much coal it takes to provide air conditioning to an average home in the Southeastern U.S., compared to the amount of coal required to cool that same home with a more energy efficient air conditioning system; and then to cool that same home after it's been given a home performance upgrade (which includes adding insulation, air sealing, duct sealing, and other low cost measures)...


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Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Fossil-fuel subsidies are a growing fiscal burden that encourage wasteful consumption. See which countries have the largest subsidies around the world.

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Click on the link for the interactive global map...


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Ollie Metcalfe's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:59 PM

Shows for fossil fuels, as well as having detrimental effects on the atmosphere also have a devastating effect on country's economy's by requiring the use of subsidies

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Infographic: Solar Power's Limitless Possibilities

Infographic: Solar Power's Limitless Possibilities | Development geography | Scoop.it

An intriguing look at just how much clean, renewable energy we could harvest from the sun...


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The Impact of the Electric Car [Infographic]

The Impact of the Electric Car [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic provides an overview of the electric car industry and describes their environmental and energy impact...

This visualization offers numerous statistics, facts and global comparisons on the future of electric vehicles, in terms of costs, environment, sales and the role of electric vehicles in our transportation systems across the globe.


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Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic]

Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it
Although 'moving season' — mid-May through mid-Sept. — is behind us, the folks at MyMove.com have some thoughts on how to haul all of your worldly possessions from points A to B with minimal eco-impact.

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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 8:38 AM

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A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | Development geography | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."

 

What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   

 

Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale. 


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NYTimes: The Death of the Fringe Suburb

NYTimes: The Death of the Fringe Suburb | Development geography | Scoop.it
As demand for housing in walkable neighborhoods rises, we should be investing in carless transit options.

 

Here is an excellent article that ties the economic mortgage crisis with the urban geography of the United States.  This is a good piece to challenge students to think about how the organization of cities matter. 


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Development data visualization

More about this programme: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wgq0l Hans Rosling's famous lectures combine enormous quantities of public data with a sport's ...

 

If you haven't seen this video, it is an incredible data visualization to explain the correlation between income and life expectancy.  He uses temporal and spatial markers to show changes from 1810 to the present.  If you discuss it in your course, this would help to explain the epidemiological transition.


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