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How the Facebook generation keeps people poor

How the Facebook generation keeps people poor | Development geography | Scoop.it

Jonathan Glennie: Tackling inequality and poverty is set back when the middle-classes in poor countries aspire to overseas living standards (Interesting take on global inequality MT “@jonathanglennie: As Facebok reaches 1bn, intl.)... Why would you want to give money in tax dollars when you can use them to buy the same standard of living as those in the richer, "more Developed" countries.

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Development geography
Investigating global inequality
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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Development geography | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   

 

Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:12 AM

When I saw this video in class I was confused at first.  I now understand it to be a parody that pokes fun at Eurocentric charities that have good intentions but often undermine places such as Africa.  Yes, Africa faces poverty and there are many charities to help support African countries, but the leaders of these charities must realize that Africa cannot exclusively be based on this one idea of poverty.  I agree with the point of "Radi-Aid", that the African story is much more positive than what the Eurocentric world makes of it.  Media always has the ability to influence our ideas about places.  We see one commerical about a charitable organization trying to help Africa and the first thing we think of is how impoverished Africans are.  Media exposes us to so many stereotypes which may not all be untrue, but incomplete.

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Slum developments across the world - 21st Century Challenges - Royal Geographical Society with IBG

Slum developments across the world - 21st Century Challenges - Royal Geographical Society with IBG | Development geography | Scoop.it
Learn about the slums, favelas and barrios that are growing in many cities across the world...
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Do we have to learn to live with slums?

Do we have to learn to live with slums? | Development geography | Scoop.it
Across the world, slums are home to a billion people, the rich elite want the shanty towns cleared, but residents are surprisingly determined not to leave. Paul Mason finds out why.

 

How does the resolve of the dwellers reflect the true need for development efforts- local solutions to local problems, self determination, and so on

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3rd World Farmer: A simulation to make you think.

3rd World Farmer: A simulation to make you think. | Development geography | Scoop.it
A free online game about rural poverty in developing nations.

This is a brilliant little simulation game suitable for students following development issues. It is great for any teacher looking at delivering the Australian Curriculum - Geography year 9 topic on food.

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Coastal Hazard Threat Map

Coastal Hazard Threat Map | Development geography | Scoop.it

This interactive map of coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island shows some basic flooding data including: 1) where are the flood warnings (essential the entire coastline), 2) how high the storm surge is, and 3) how high the waves are.

 

Tags: Rhode Island, water, disasters, geospatial.


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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:39 AM

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

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Land Acquisitions in the Developing World – the New Resource Imperialism? - ISN

Land Acquisitions in the Developing World – the New Resource Imperialism? - ISN | Development geography | Scoop.it

ISNLand Acquisitions in the Developing World – the New Resource Imperialism?ISNLarge-scale foreign investments in the farmlands of the developing world have been branded as a new form of 'imperialism'. Is it a new Imperialism? How is this different from China's desire to buy Cubby Station in Australia?

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A dramatic representation of the maldistribution of global income

A dramatic representation of the maldistribution of global income | Development geography | Scoop.it
It divides the world into five equal population groups from the richest to the poorest and shows that the richest fifth of the world's population enjoys 87% of the world's income, whilst he bottom fifth earn less than 1%.
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Energy Used in a Google Search

Energy Used in a Google Search | Development geography | Scoop.it

The world's largest search engine, Google processes nearly 13 billion searches.  How does this translate into energy use?


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A Core Set of Global Environmental Indicators

A Core Set of Global Environmental Indicators | Development geography | Scoop.it

To cut a long story short, if you leave below sea level or happen to be a polar bear, it’s time to pack up and move...


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Power Consumption Facts in the U.S.

Power Consumption Facts in the U.S. | Development geography | Scoop.it
Infographic on power consumption facts in the U.S.

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The Local Food System

The Local Food System | Development geography | Scoop.it

CITIES is re-interpreting urban farming as an asset for the city economy. This approach to the subject is neither revolutionary nor especially innovative, yet in the collation of an original set of parameters (community activity, urban landscapes and design applications) with existing approaches, new directions emerge...


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The State of Food Insecurity

The State of Food Insecurity | Development geography | Scoop.it
Millions of Americans don't have reliable access to food. Here, we take a look at who's affected and why.

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Poor Health in America Infographic

Poor Health in America Infographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Poor Health in America Infographic Related Posts:The Impact of Poor Health Infographic3 Best Chinese Herbal Medicines for Heart HealthSoothe Your Pains With Clove OilUsing Aromatherapy, Teas and Extracts of Herbs to Relieve Your PainDon’t Fall for...
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Sorry, WHAT?!: EVERY Piece Of Plastic Ever Made Still Exists TODAY?!

Sorry, WHAT?!: EVERY Piece Of Plastic Ever Made Still Exists TODAY?! | Development geography | Scoop.it
That's a lot of Barbie shoes....
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Monitoring the Storm Surge

Monitoring the Storm Surge | Development geography | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...

 

When the Pawtuxet River flooded in Rhode Island, I was watching this site to get a sense of how bad the flooding was and to put it in historic context (the National Weather Service has links to live data at many locations).  This particular station in NYC at the Battery is important to keep an eye on with Hurricane Sandy because if the strom surge is over 10 feet, the subway system could flood and the issues confronting New York would be devastating.  As meterologist Andy Lesage noted, "During Irene it got to 9.5ft, 8-12 inches shy of flooding the subway system so if the Battery gets to something like 10.25+ ft, it will indicate massive damage to the cities' infrastructure."  For more see, the Weather Underground and Jeff Masters' analysis.

 

Tags: disasters,water, physical, NYC, transportation, weather and climate.


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Gary Robertson's comment, November 2, 2012 9:57 AM
This chart shows graphically how time-of-day (high tide), time-of-month (high lunar tide), and time of landfall all coincided to help create this disaster. it just wasn't a wind-driven event, but a coincidental alignment of several factors resulting in a worst-case result.
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An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.

 

It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.

 

Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...


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How the Facebook generation keeps people poor

How the Facebook generation keeps people poor | Development geography | Scoop.it

Jonathan Glennie: Tackling inequality and poverty is set back when the middle-classes in poor countries aspire to overseas living standards (Interesting take on global inequality MT “@jonathanglennie: As Facebok reaches 1bn, intl.)... Why would you want to give money in tax dollars when you can use them to buy the same standard of living as those in the richer, "more Developed" countries.

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The rise of megacities - interactive

The rise of megacities - interactive | Development geography | Scoop.it

By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities. A fantastic way for geography students to gain an understanding of urbanisation as part of the "development" process for countries. Questions to ask: Where is the rapid rise in urbanisation occurring? Why there? What are the implications for the population living in these centres? Is it an issue to be concerned about at a global, regional, or local scale?

This needs to be opened in Google Chrome or Firefox or other new type of browser.

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Infographic: Life on Less Than $2 a Day

Infographic: Life on Less Than $2 a Day | Development geography | Scoop.it
A global snapshot of the cost of survival in several developing nations...

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Fair Trade: Understanding What's Behind the Label

Fair Trade: Understanding What's Behind the Label | Development geography | Scoop.it
Find out more about fair trade products, how they're produced, and which countries are buying the most.

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Interactive: How Much CO2 Is Created By…

Interactive: How Much CO2 Is Created By… | Development geography | Scoop.it

Every action, every event, every person, everything emits a certain amount of carbon. This interactive visualization examines some of those scenarios. Play around to learn some interesting and surprising information about how much carbon is released during various activities.


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Research: Mapping the Impact of Traffic on the Livability of Streets

Research: Mapping the Impact of Traffic on the Livability of Streets | Development geography | Scoop.it
More automobile traffic = Fewer friends.

Looking at the social effects of traffic and neighborhood layout, and the analysis of peoples' environmental perceptions.


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How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context?

How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Although the U.S. only comprises 5% of the the world’s population, we consume 20% of the world’s energy. Does this make you, as an American citizen, 20 times worse than the average Indian, 4 times worse than the average Brazilian and twice as bad as the average German? Or does it mean you live, work and play that much harder? Take a look and see what you see...


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