Development geography
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Development geography
Investigating global inequality
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Woman Stats Project

Woman Stats Project | Development geography | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge."

 

With assistance from the Geography Dept. at Brigham Young University, the WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.  


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Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:53 PM
I think this just reinforces the factual information that we already know of about how different cultures across the world treat women in all regards/aspects of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 9:51 PM
This information provided from this map reveals much more to the observer than the security of women. From looking at the location of the wealthiest counties in the world, I can make a connection between women’s rights and economic strength, education, birth rates as well as life expectancy in different regions of the globe.
Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:56 PM

interesting human geography standpoint

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StatPlanet World Bank

StatPlanet World Bank | Development geography | Scoop.it

Explore world stats using StatPlanet World Bank, the first prize winner of the World Bank's Apps for Development competition. It directly accesses and visualizes all of the World Bank's 3000+ indicators available through its Open Data initiative, on many different topics from Agriculture to Science & Technology.  This is a great way to introduce students to thematic mapping and offers incredible freedom to explore what you find interesting.  This is the type of resource that could be used for any unit.   


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The 2011 Failed States Index

The 2011 Failed States Index | Development geography | Scoop.it

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  Foreign Policy, in conjunction with the Fund for Peace, has created a statistical ranking to measure the lack of effective political institutions.  For the 4th year running, Somalia has been statistically measured as the most failed state on Earth. Chad and Sudan are respectively ranked as the 2nd and 3rd most failed states.The 12 metrics that are a part of this index are:

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Illegitimate Govts.

•Brain Drain

•Public Services

•Inequality

•Group Grievances

•Human Rights

•Economic Decline

•Security Forces

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 16, 2012 9:57 PM
The global fallout of the Arab revolutions may be largely determined by demographics and political stability. Unlike Somalia for example which is in total anarchy, the Arab Spring uprisings occurred in more stable but oppressive governments. So this brings up the question, can a failed state rescue itself?
Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:35 PM
Althought sub-Saharan Africa has 5 of the 10 most quickly developing countries, they still lag very far behind the rest of the world in quality of living. Somalia, Chad and Suda are the most failed states on Earth, in order. The governments are unable to protect/provide for their people, brain drains suck the great minds to more developed countries, income inequalities ravage the nations, basic human rights are denied and the economies are pathetic. Overall, it is a sad story as many of these African nations also suffer from drought, famine and massive food shortages.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:11 PM

 I wonder why it is difficult for states to be formed. I would think it would be great because the village people won’t be forced to make big decisions they can just hire someone to do it for them. But in the other hand there would be other people who will make it difficult for them and will ruin it for everyone else. Becoming a state can change there live. They should have approved to become a state.

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Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | Development geography | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties


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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Development geography | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | Development geography | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 9:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 8:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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World Bank eAtlas of Global Development

"The World Bank eAtlas of Global Development maps and graphs more than 175 thematically organized indicators for over 200 countries, letting you visualize and compare progress on the most important development challenges facing our world. Most indicators cover several decades, so you can see, for example, how 'life expectancy at birth' has improved from 1960 up through the latest year."  This tool should greatly enhance student projects as they will add more data, and see bigger patterns.  To go to the link visit: http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-global/en


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2012 United States Peace Index

For a static version of this information, see: http://www.visionofhumanity.org/unitedstatespeaceindex/2012/


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Understanding Poverty in the United States

Understanding Poverty in the United States | Development geography | Scoop.it
Analysis of poverty in the USA: poor children rarely hungry; poor often have cable TV, air conditioning, a computer, and larger homes than non-poor Europeans.

 

This is an interesting series of bar graphs, pie charts and other data sets, all showing helping us to contextualize the life of the poor.  How is 'being poor' in the United States distinct from poverty in other regions of the world?  Is it fair to distinguish between the two?  How do you define poverty?  Is it a universal standard that is the same everywhere or is it a relation measure compared to others within the community? 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 22, 2012 8:22 AM
i believe one of the major issues as was stated, is coming up with a true definition of poverty. The word should not be merely thrown around. A practical definition would include the ability to acquire your basic needs, food, shelter etc, all your necessities. I hate to break it to them, but cable tv, is not essential to daily life. Air conditioning is a thin line, depending on whether or not the person(s) require it due to medical conditions. Sure it is wonderful to have the internet and video game systems, but it doesn't make it unlivable to go without. As long as you have a decent living space with your bills paid and enough food to eat, you can hardly be considered poor.