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The Cold, Hard Truth About Recycling Steel - Earth911.com

The Cold, Hard Truth About Recycling Steel - Earth911.com | Development geography | Scoop.it
Guide to local resources including recycling centers, how to recycle, pollution prevention and how help protect the environment.

We’ve come across quite a few creative uses of unconventional materials lately, from shipping containers made of mushrooms to bow ties made of soda cans, computer parts and pills. But when it comes to producing automobiles, large buildings and machinery, steel is still king.

According to steel building site BuildingsGuide.com, the material also has some built-in advantages when it comes to recycling.

Because steel is a metal, it can be separated from a muddled single-stream of recyclables by using magnets. It’s also considerably less finicky than plastics, according to the site, in that steel doesn’t need to be separated by color or size before it’s recycled can all be melted down at once.

And, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute, technological advances have seen the energy intensity needed to produce a ton of steel drop by 27 percent since 1990, helping in part to make steel the world’s most recycled material...

Click on the image for the complete infographic.


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Infographic: How many tons of waste goes to landfills in Britain..?

Infographic: How many tons of waste goes to landfills in Britain..? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Britain is beginning to do its bit when it comes to the environment but there are still millions of tonnes of waste being dumped here every year... 

Mat Crocker, head of illegals and waste at the Environment Agency, said: ‘We can’t keep putting waste in the ground indefinitely because there is limited capacity left in England and Wales. 

‘But the good news is that we are taking recycling and reusing more seriously.’

He said more than 40 per cent of household waste was recycled in England last year, compared to just 11 per cent ten years ago. ‘Increased recycling means that the amount of waste we send to landfill has been reduced by nearly half over the past decade,’ he added...

More details at the infographic link.


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Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic]

Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it
Although 'moving season' — mid-May through mid-Sept. — is behind us, the folks at MyMove.com have some thoughts on how to haul all of your worldly possessions from points A to B with minimal eco-impact.

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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 8:38 AM

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Sustainable Futures

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Infographic: Trash and Recycling Trends

Infographic: Trash and Recycling Trends | Development geography | Scoop.it

Ever wondered how much trash you create over the course of a year? The amount may surprise you! This infographic to show you the dirty details on just how much garbage is generated and recycled across the globe...


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Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC]

Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC] | Development geography | Scoop.it
This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet's supply of Rare Earth Elements.

Apple sold a record 5 million iPhones the first weekend the phone was on the market. And unlike in the iPhone’s early days, the latest Apple smartphones are not primarily being purchased by first time owners.

But did you ever stop to think about what happens to all those iPhone 3, 3GS, 4 and 4Ss now deemed out of date? While there are many recycling programs available, most smartphones are not efficiently thrown out.

Apple’s iPhones is far from the only culprit — most every smartphone, hard drive, hybrid car, satellite, MRI machine and GPS, along with dozens of other tech gadgets, are made from Rare Earth Elements.

This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet’s supply of rare earth elements...


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