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Development data visualization

More about this programme: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wgq0l Hans Rosling's famous lectures combine enormous quantities of public data with a sport's ...

 

If you haven't seen this video, it is an incredible data visualization to explain the correlation between income and life expectancy.  He uses temporal and spatial markers to show changes from 1810 to the present.  If you discuss it in your course, this would help to explain the epidemiological transition.


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Global Healthcare Patterns

Global Healthcare Patterns | Development geography | Scoop.it
The Guardian's health editor introduces our health factfile - and the full dataset behind it...

 

Discussion questions: What regional patterns are there in the per capita healthcare spending?  What connection would you expect between per capita health care spending and the quantity of doctors?  What areas spend the least on healthcare?  How come? 


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Botswana's 'Stunning Achievement' Against AIDS

A decade ago, Botswana was facing a national crisis as AIDS appeared on the verge of decimating the country's adult population. Now, the country provides free, life-saving AIDS drugs to almost all of its citizens who need them.

 

This is a great example, and possibly a template on how to tackle the AIDS/HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Botswana was as hard hit as any country, but they fully invested their economic initiatives into tackling this and actively changed cultural attitudes and behaviors that faciliate transmission.  Not all is 'doom and gloom' when looking at poverty and disease-stricken countries.   


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James Hobson's curator insight, November 3, 2014 8:36 PM

(Africa topic 9)

This video illustrates many of the factor which have contributed to Botswana's success (as well as other nations' failures) against HIV/AIDS. Preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS is not just a "yes or no" decision.

Many people live in areas where treatment is not available. Others live where treatment is available, but it is inconsistent or improper. And yet even some of those to whom proper treatment is available choose not to receive it.

Just as has been associated with cancer, many believe (and some statistics seem to support this, even if only indirectly) one's attitude is a major influence on one's outcome. The same can be said for the outcome of all those in a region as well. In this sense, a little can go a long way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:13 PM

Media often depicts Africa and the HIV/AIDS crisis as a hopeless, out of control issue. Despite the media, Botswana has actually almost reversed its AIDS issues with diligent work by the government. Instead of relying on foreign aid, Botswana took matters into its own hands. Knowing that its people's survival was on the line, the government put both money and resources into finding ways to stop the spread and to make the lives of those infected much better. By changing the cultural outlook on the virus, people are starting to seek help and to no longer fear those with the disease. Botswana's new challenge will be to educate its people so they do not underestimate the treatable virus and practice prevention. 

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 2:04 PM

Working with the government can help improve the lives of people. Availability of drugs across social strata helps. 

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HealthMap | Global Health, Local Knowledge

HealthMap | Global Health, Local Knowledge | Development geography | Scoop.it

How is drought in East Africa impacting the spread of diseases?  Is flu season hitting your city particularly hard this year?  Where are the disease problems the worst?  All of these question can be answered (in part) by these helpful maps. This site, which depends on crowdsourced data, may need to few more users before it's database is robust enough, but the idea of it is quite amibitious. 


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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Development geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 10:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 7:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s.