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Infographic: Understanding Carbon Offsets

Infographic: Understanding Carbon Offsets | Development geography | Scoop.it
With only 13 percent of carbon emissions naturally sequestered a year, the concept of offsets is meant to lessen our growing carbon footprint.

When we exhale, we release carbon dioxide into the air around us. That carbon dioxide is naturally removed from the atmosphere by plants and the ocean in what is known as the carbon cycle. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s, human activities like burning coal and cutting down forests have thrown off the carbon cycle's delicate balance.

Take a look at our latest infographic to see why the concept for carbon offsets were first created.


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ONE | INFOGRAPHIC: Closing the gender gap in land rights

ONE | INFOGRAPHIC: Closing the gender gap in land rights | Development geography | Scoop.it

Although women play an indispensable role in the rural economy, they face severe constraints in accessing the agricultural assets and services they need to maximize their production. It has become increasingly clear that there is a “gender gap” in resources such as land, technology, and extension services; that the gap imposes costs not only on women but also on the broader economy and society; and that closing the gap would improve agricultural productivity and reduce hunger and poverty. Oft-cited statistics from a recent FAO report focus on the gains that could be made if women had equal access to non-land resources. In light of evidence that secure rights to land for women can increase agricultural productivity and confer other household benefits, we at Landesa think it is critical to consider what additional gains could be made if women had equal access to one of the most important assets to agricultural households: land.


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The Impact of the Electric Car [Infographic]

The Impact of the Electric Car [Infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it

This infographic provides an overview of the electric car industry and describes their environmental and energy impact...

This visualization offers numerous statistics, facts and global comparisons on the future of electric vehicles, in terms of costs, environment, sales and the role of electric vehicles in our transportation systems across the globe.


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Using Infographics to Educate the World About Human Rights

Using Infographics to Educate the World About Human Rights | Development geography | Scoop.it
As individuals, we may disagree on many issues, from philosophy to politics, to what constitutes proper nutrition. But if there is one topic everyone recognizes as tremendously important, it’s that everyone is entitled to basic human rights.

One of the biggest challenges to getting people the rights they deserve as human beings, however, is awareness. And many human rights activist organizations have turned to visualization to help inform the public about issues going on in the world. At Visual.ly, we recognize this struggle to inform, so we’ve decided to open up a Human Rights topic on our newly redesigned site. This topic will provide a place for people to educate themselves about many of the humanitarian movements around the planet. To help kick off the category and raise awareness, here are 12 visualizations about humanitarian issues...


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Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Fossil-fuel subsidies are a growing fiscal burden that encourage wasteful consumption. See which countries have the largest subsidies around the world.

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Click on the link for the interactive global map...


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Ollie Metcalfe's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:59 PM

Shows for fossil fuels, as well as having detrimental effects on the atmosphere also have a devastating effect on country's economy's by requiring the use of subsidies

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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | Development geography | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.