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Energy Used in a Google Search

Energy Used in a Google Search | Development geography | Scoop.it

The world's largest search engine, Google processes nearly 13 billion searches.  How does this translate into energy use?


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How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context?

How Does American Energy Consumption Measure Up in a Global Context? | Development geography | Scoop.it

Although the U.S. only comprises 5% of the the world’s population, we consume 20% of the world’s energy. Does this make you, as an American citizen, 20 times worse than the average Indian, 4 times worse than the average Brazilian and twice as bad as the average German? Or does it mean you live, work and play that much harder? Take a look and see what you see...


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Oil, the modern world's lifeblood [infographic]

Oil, the modern world's lifeblood [infographic] | Development geography | Scoop.it

An infographic describing our current oil situation and what peak oil is...

Today’s infographic suggests when a country discovers oil it will increase production exponentially until it peaks and begins its decline. Why does this matter? Because it is possible Saudi Arabia, the ones controlling oil prices, will potentially be peaking between 2012 and 2017. With reports showing they may be lying about the number of barrels they have, by as many as 300 billion barrels.


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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | Development geography | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


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Infographic: How Big is Your Pile of Coal?

Infographic: How Big is Your Pile of Coal? | Development geography | Scoop.it
We all know that when we flip a light switch on the wall, illuminating a lamp on the ceiling as if by magic, it's not magic.

There's a long and extremely complex series of events that makes that little action possible, and, for many of us across the country, it begins in a coal fired power plant.

If you're one of the millions of Americans whose home is powered by coal, you may have wondered: just how much coal does it take to supply electricity to my house?

Our friends over at EnergySavvy have a great new infographic that explains how much coal it takes to provide air conditioning to an average home in the Southeastern U.S., compared to the amount of coal required to cool that same home with a more energy efficient air conditioning system; and then to cool that same home after it's been given a home performance upgrade (which includes adding insulation, air sealing, duct sealing, and other low cost measures)...


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Infographic: Solar Power's Limitless Possibilities

Infographic: Solar Power's Limitless Possibilities | Development geography | Scoop.it

An intriguing look at just how much clean, renewable energy we could harvest from the sun...


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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | Development geography | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests

Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests | Development geography | Scoop.it
A new global survey suggests world's the most wasteful countries feel the least guilty—and vice-versa.

 

Our consumption patterns, ecological footprint and lifestyle choices have a significant impact on how we feel about sustainability initiatives and human/environmental interactions.  


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Seth D.'s comment, September 4, 2012 8:27 AM
This article explains about America being the least green in the world when it comes to transportation, etc. Things are being done which can bring a good impact to our environment like cleaner gasoline or cars that are run on electricity like the hybrid cars that you see in the commercials on TV. But, there's also a few other ways to make a good impact on the environment like riding a bicycle to work for take public transportation or walk to places you want to go to. Not only we can get good exercise by walking or riding a bicycle but you can reduce the emmissions in the air form your own car. When it comes to food, Americans can start eating vegetables to make a good impact on the environment.
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Power Consumption Facts in the U.S.

Power Consumption Facts in the U.S. | Development geography | Scoop.it
Infographic on power consumption facts in the U.S.

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Intro to Energy: A Global Picture

Intro to Energy: A Global Picture | Development geography | Scoop.it
A global picture of energy supply, demand, and trends.

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Infographic: deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions

Infographic: deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions | Development geography | Scoop.it

Because trees help absorb greenhouse gases, forest preservation plays an important role in controlling climate change. When forests are destroyed or degraded that harms our ability to control climate change. A new report from the Congressional Budget Office says there are three big challenges: building capacity to better document forest absorbtion capacity and its loss; improving governance in countries where the problem is most pronounced; and calibrating policy responses so they’re effective on a global scale. The study is titled “Deforestation and Greenhouse gases.”

A related CBO infographic helps tell the story...


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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Development geography | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


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Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic

Global Energy Subsidies Map -- National Geographic | Development geography | Scoop.it
Fossil-fuel subsidies are a growing fiscal burden that encourage wasteful consumption. See which countries have the largest subsidies around the world.

Nations are weighing phaseout of fossil fuel subsidies, a growing fiscal burden that ratchets up carbon dioxide emissions by encouraging wasteful oil, natural gas, and coal consumption. The largest subsidies are in developing countries, which spend more than $400 billion annually shielding their populations from high fuel prices. But oil industry tax breaks and other government measures in developed nations also subsidize fossil fuels, to the tune of $45 billion to $75 billion per year.

Click on the link for the interactive global map...


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Ollie Metcalfe's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:59 PM

Shows for fossil fuels, as well as having detrimental effects on the atmosphere also have a devastating effect on country's economy's by requiring the use of subsidies

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Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer | Development geography | Scoop.it
Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S.

 

This goes nicely with the carbon footprint data that was recently posted.  Although that was data aggregated at the national level and this is on the 'world realms' level, many of the same patterns are visible without the same specificity. 


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Sustainable Urbanism

http://www.ted.com Jaime Lerner reinvented urban space in his native Curitiba, Brazil. Along the way, he changed the way city planners worldwide see whats po...

 

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  To see an trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swQTTG3NcYY


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 8:02 AM

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  Click here to see the trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 11:47 AM

This video is enlightening.  The speaker uses the city as a model for fixing problems in the world.  Instead of seeing the city as an enemy to environmentalism, he purposes changing the cities and reworking old sites like quarries into something that is useable today.  He also advocates the integration of the transportation systems to make commuting more feasible as well as less pollution generating. 

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Development geography | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.