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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Development geography | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   

 

Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2014 3:55 PM

This video, especially the song shows how many people of the west try to solve the problems of other countries, and "save" them, without really putting themselves in their shoes.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:48 PM

This video is a satire regarding the aid sent to Africa, in this case it is aid from Africa sent to Norway. This was created as many within Africa feel the aid given is the wrong things or simply old unwanted garbage. If America and Europe wish to actually send effective aid to Africa its important to diagnose the problems and then send them goods that can actually address the problem.  

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:01 AM

This comedic video of Africa sending Radiator's to Norway, a country that experiences cold weather every year, demonstrates how (we as westerners especially) tend to overwhelm the continent with things they have an overwhelming collection of. Africa is sometimes seen as a continent in need, but people who are sending "aid" to the continent often neglect to understand that they continent have made great stride to be able to compete in the global economy. Now that the roles have been reversed, its funny to see African's taking initiative to help Norway combat there winter weather.

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Why Invest in Women?

Why Invest in Women? | Development geography | Scoop.it

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NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty

NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty | Development geography | Scoop.it
Brazil, Russia, India and China are profoundly shaking up the G8. All of these newcomers give aid to developing countries. And yet some still receive substantial aid themselves from the U.S. and other donors.

 

This seems to be a is a strange juxtaposition: surging countries in the global economy are also recipients of international aid from NGOs.  Too often we view the country as though that is the logical scale at which to discuss all issues such as economic growth and poverty.  Too often we view the border as though all things within the border are homogenous and difference lies on the other side of the border.  The author of this article argues that the future for NGOs is increasing collaboration and partnerships with the private sector to lead to a 'convergence' between the economic aims of the local economy and the humanitarian goals of the NGOs.


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Brianna S.'s comment, August 27, 2012 11:17 AM
I find that this article interestingly explains how NGOs are becoming more prevalent in both private and public sectors, especially as the BRIC nations continue to move up in GDP and economic prosperity. However, countries such as China and Russia are not exactly welcoming NGOs with open arms. It begs the question of whether or not these communistic countries are willing to adapt their hostilities toward international private aid, especially considering large amounts of their own citizens continue to live in poverty.
Niu Zi Bin's curator insight, January 17, 2013 1:20 AM

wow

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Africa Next

Africa Next | Development geography | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
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Botswana's 'Stunning Achievement' Against AIDS

A decade ago, Botswana was facing a national crisis as AIDS appeared on the verge of decimating the country's adult population. Now, the country provides free, life-saving AIDS drugs to almost all of its citizens who need them.

 

This is a great example, and possibly a template on how to tackle the AIDS/HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Botswana was as hard hit as any country, but they fully invested their economic initiatives into tackling this and actively changed cultural attitudes and behaviors that faciliate transmission.  Not all is 'doom and gloom' when looking at poverty and disease-stricken countries.   


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James Hobson's curator insight, November 3, 2014 8:36 PM

(Africa topic 9)

This video illustrates many of the factor which have contributed to Botswana's success (as well as other nations' failures) against HIV/AIDS. Preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS is not just a "yes or no" decision.

Many people live in areas where treatment is not available. Others live where treatment is available, but it is inconsistent or improper. And yet even some of those to whom proper treatment is available choose not to receive it.

Just as has been associated with cancer, many believe (and some statistics seem to support this, even if only indirectly) one's attitude is a major influence on one's outcome. The same can be said for the outcome of all those in a region as well. In this sense, a little can go a long way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:13 PM

Media often depicts Africa and the HIV/AIDS crisis as a hopeless, out of control issue. Despite the media, Botswana has actually almost reversed its AIDS issues with diligent work by the government. Instead of relying on foreign aid, Botswana took matters into its own hands. Knowing that its people's survival was on the line, the government put both money and resources into finding ways to stop the spread and to make the lives of those infected much better. By changing the cultural outlook on the virus, people are starting to seek help and to no longer fear those with the disease. Botswana's new challenge will be to educate its people so they do not underestimate the treatable virus and practice prevention. 

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 2:04 PM

Working with the government can help improve the lives of people. Availability of drugs across social strata helps. 

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Selling condoms in the Congo

TED Talks HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why?

 

This video highlights why some well-intending NGOs with excellent plans for the developing world don't have the impact they are hoping for. Cultural barriers to diffusion abound and finding a way to make your idea resonate with your target audience takes some preparation. This also addresses some important demographic and health-related issues, so the clip could be used in a variety of places within the curriculum. FYI: this clip briefly shows some steamy condom ads.


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:45 PM

Marketing is not something I would have thought about when trying to get people in the Kongo to use condoms. Her research into the brands they use and why may save many lives.

Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:27 PM

I was surprised actually that it took this long for someone to think of this, given the fact that the AIDS crisis in Africa is practically a pandemic.However it is a good idea that someone had finally started to do something about it.  

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 13, 2014 5:37 PM

This video explains the errors that a lot of NGOs make when attempting to help the developing world. While the NGOs have done a service providing condoms in the DRC, they lack appropriate marketing and merchandising for the product itself. In a way, the organizations need to eliminate their egos in the situation and allow for the product to be marketed appropriately.

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Haiti: After the Quake

Haiti: After the Quake | Development geography | Scoop.it
Al Jazeera's Sebastian Walker asks why a system that was designed to help Haitians ended up exacerbating their misery.

 

Why isn't more money the answer to the 'poverty problem?' What geographic factors make Haitian development such a difficult issue? 


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sspivey's comment, January 30, 2012 2:14 PM
During our spring break this March, I will be in Haiti on a week long medical mission trip.
Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 2:41 PM
Once again, American's arrogant beliefs about how everyone else SHOULD live their lives has caused a bad situation to become worse. We rush in to help, with good intentions, but we fail to see what the Haitians really needed help with. Instead of asking them "What can we do for you?" and really listening to the answer, we rush in and help them the way WE want to. Ultimately our 'help' actually makes their situation worse.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:57 PM

Once again, American's arrogant beliefs about how everyone else SHOULD live their lives has caused a bad situation to become worse. We rush in to help, with good intentions, but we fail to see what the Haitians really needed help with. Instead of asking them "What can we do for you?" and really listening to the answer, we rush in and help them the way WE want to. Ultimately our 'help' actually makes their situation worse.

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US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005

US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005 | Development geography | Scoop.it
Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005...

 

This interactive graph is not visually intuitive and easy to interpret, but it is a wealth of information about the United States geopolitical policies throughout time in addition to it's humanitarian aid throughout the developing world.  For example, you can see that the aid to Vietnam from 1965-1973 exploded, and to Israel from 1976-2002.  In 1947, the United Kingdom (under the Marshall Plan) accounted for over half of all of the international aid.   


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 5:05 PM

In this graph it shows the US foreign aid over time from 1946-2005. In this diagram it shows the difference in 1965-1973 from Vietnam sky rocketed and the same thing happened in '76-2002 in Israel.  But the Marshall plan once enacted helped the UK people and other nations.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 13, 2014 3:15 AM

Foreign Aid

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Emergency Management: #ActNow, Save Later

Since the year 2000, almost 1 million people have lost their lives to disasters caused by natural hazards. 2 billion people have been affected. 1 trillion do...

 

In the last decade, almost one million people have been killed by disasters and more than one trillion dollars have been lost. Yet only 1% of international aid is spent to minimize the impact of these disasters.  Every $1 spent on preparedness saves $7 on response, so the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has established http://www.actnowsavelater.org to prepare for the disasters which will surely come. 


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 5, 2012 8:18 PM
I think this is a great video depicting how disasters are handled today. Lack of preparation increases more damage caused by natural disasters. If more time and money is spent on devising plans on how to prepare for disasters, preventing it, and alleviating the issue, there would be less money lost and most importantly more lives saved.