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16 brilliant innovations tackling poverty around the world

16 brilliant innovations tackling poverty around the world | Development Economics | Scoop.it
These innovations are helping to alleviate poverty-related inequalities for communities around the world.
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Mapping Africa's natural resources

Mapping Africa's natural resources | Development Economics | Scoop.it
An overview of the continent's main natural resources.
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From Geoff Riley: Here is an updated chart on the main natural resources for African countries - great when teaching resource traps, primary product dependency and related topics. Is the wealth that lies below the ground more significant than what lies above? Turning natural capital into sustainable, inclusive/equitable growth and development progress is difficult but a growing number of sub Saharan African countries have made notable strides forwards in recent years. The weakness of world commodity prices is leading to forecast growth in SSA to be cut. Oil exporting countries are struggling but many non-commodity exporting nations continue to enjoy rapid growth. According to the IMF, "the full picture of sub-Saharan Africa is one of multispeed growth in which regional aggregate numbers hide considerable diversity." That said, economic growth in Africa is forecast to drop to 23-year-low of 1.4 pct in 2016 according to the latest IMF forecasts. More here from the WSJ http://www.wsj.com/articles/imf-cuts-2016-growth-outlook-for-sub-saharan-africa-to-1-4-1477375241
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Living On One Dollar

Ces gars-là ont vécu sur 1 $ / jour. Pourrais-tu? Un documentaire de 53 minutes qui va changer la façon dont vous pensez. Pourriez-vous vivre avec 1 $ pa
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How to spend it

How to spend it | Development Economics | Scoop.it
An ambitious attempt to work out the best use for scarce resources
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Evaluating strategies to improve economic development
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Mind the fair trade gap

Mind the fair trade gap | Development Economics | Scoop.it
‘If fair trade does deliver higher incomes for farmers, it may prove too successful for its own good’ In 2001, the world price of coffee sank to its lowest ebb for decades, threatening dreadful har...
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Evaluation

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Poverty and the Tolerance of the Intolerable - Video and audio - News and media - Home

Poverty and the Tolerance of the Intolerable - Video and audio - News and media - Home | Development Economics | Scoop.it
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Well below par

Well below par | Development Economics | Scoop.it
WHEN the price of oil tumbles, you should worry about a country that relies on the stuff for 75% of government revenue and 95% of exports. That country is Nigeria,...
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Great example of primary-product dependency

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It Takes A Village

It Takes A Village | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Even as more U.S. appliances meet Energy Star standards, America is still an energy glutton compared with much of the world. That router that you never bother to turn off, for instance, uses more kilowatt-hours per year than does the average Tanzanian. Inspired by the Center for Global Development, we contrast the annual energy consumption of various appliances with the per capita usage of five energy-poor nations.
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So who is responsible for and who suffers the most from global warming?

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Dimitri Zenghelis - Economic Impacts of Climate Change & The Global Outlook for Response - YouTube

Dimitri Zenghelis - Economic Impacts of Climate Change & The Global Outlook for Response
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More info for question 1 RES Econ essay comp...

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An Entire Island Nation Is Vanishing Because Of Global Warming

An Entire Island Nation Is Vanishing Because Of Global Warming | Development Economics | Scoop.it
The Pacific island nation of Kiribati, a chain of 33 atolls and islands will likely become uninhabitable in 60 years because of sea level rise.
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This will be useful for those working on essay 1 of the RES competition (Promoting growth and fighting poverty should be the priority in the developing world, not reducing greenhouse gases.” Do you agree?).

 

Clearly global warming is affecting many parts of the developing world in a very bad way so shifting attention away from renewables will not help the rate at which temperatures and sea levels are rising and all of the other negative externalities associated with this monstrous market failure.

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Equatorial Guinea: Squandered riches - FT.com

Equatorial Guinea: Squandered riches - FT.com | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Standing nearly five storeys high, the granite headquarters of the Democratic Party of Equatorial Guinea epitomises the power of this small country’s ruling party. A pastiche of Middle East extravagance, false Greek columns and brutalist Soviet
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Equatorial Guinea is perhaps the world’s best example of the resource curse: instead of creating prosperity, its oil underpins a dictatorship, fosters corruption and undermines economic development.

Human Rights Watch describes the problem bluntly, saying that “corruption, poverty, and repression continue to plague” the nation. “Vast oil revenues fund lavish lifestyles for the small elite surrounding the president, while most of the population lives in poverty, their basic economic and social rights unmet.”

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Making most of remittances: Vision and strategies - Mayumi Ozaki

Remittances are the bedrock of Nepal’s economy. They’ve quadrupled since 2010 thanks to 2 million Nepalis who work abroad, generating nearly one-third of the gross domestic product.
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Remittances are the bedrock of Nepal’s economy. They’ve quadrupled since 2010 thanks to 2 million Nepalis who work abroad, generating nearly one-third of the gross domestic product. The net positives of this boom sector are undeniable. Remittances have reduced absolute poverty, providing households with extra money to spend on education, health and property. They have kept the balance of payments in surplus for most of the last decade and the exchange rate stable despite turbulent political and economic conditions. For most young people, migrating to find work is a necessity.
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Why African cities don’t make their residents richer

Why African cities don’t make their residents richer | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Urban growth in sub-Saharan Africa is wonky, badly managed and too fast
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Analysing the Effectiveness of Aid | Economics | tutor2u

Analysing the Effectiveness of Aid | Economics | tutor2u | Development Economics | Scoop.it
There's a cracking article in this week's Economist examining the pros and cons of overseas aid - the perfect reading ahead of the Unit 4 exam next week!
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13 game-changing African infrastructure projects

13 game-changing African infrastructure projects | Development Economics | Scoop.it
A look at some major project completed in Africa in 2015, and some that are ongoing.
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Overcoming a key limitation
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WORLD POPULATION PYRAMID

WORLD POPULATION PYRAMID | Development Economics | Scoop.it
The World's best Population Pyramid covering 100 years of age and sex distribution for every country in the world.
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Plunging commodity prices reignite discussion of primary product dependency

Plunging commodity prices reignite discussion of primary product dependency | Development Economics | Scoop.it
As world commodity prices plunge, who gains and who loses?.
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How the world’s biggest companies bribe foreign governments—in 11 charts

How the world’s biggest companies bribe foreign governments—in 11 charts | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Bribery knows no boundaries, or borders.
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factors inhibiting development

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2014 World Cup Finalists - Human and Economic Development Indicators

2014 World Cup Finalists - Human and Economic Development Indicators | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Drawing on data from the 2013 Human Development Report, here are the 24 countries in the 2014 World Cup ranked according to the Human Development Scores.
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Development Data for Cambodia

Development Data for Cambodia | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Here is a selection of development data for Cambodia put into context with a selection of other Asian countries, drawing on published data from the Asian Development Bank. This blog will be added to shortly with summary notes on the economy and links to other useful resources.
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Stern report: the key points

Stern report: the key points | Development Economics | Scoop.it
The dangers
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Again related to RES essay #1 (Promoting growth and fighting poverty should be the priority in the developing world, not reducing greenhouse gases.” Do you agree?) here's a link to a summary of the Stern report - the first serious attempt to put a monetary value on climate change.

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Master of microfinance - YouTube

Master of microfinance - YouTube | Development Economics | Scoop.it
Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi founder of Grameen Bank, claims that entrepreneurship can offset the flaws of capitalism. For more video content from the Fin...
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Muhammad Yunus is an economist and Nobel Peace Prize winner who has further developed the concepts of microcredit and micro-finance. In 2006 Muhammad Yunus and Grameen Bank received the Nobel Peace Prize for their work in microcredit and their efforts to create economic and social development.

How it works

The concept of micro-credit loans is centered on the idea that the poor have not been able to fully utilize their skills and thus with right incentive can earn more money. When providing loans, Grameen bank uses a group-based credit approach in order to make sure that social pressure within rural communities ensures that borrowers uphold their end of the contract (making repayments on time and achieving a good credit standing).

Grameen bank’s credit policy focuses on providing the under-served populations with support and as a result 94% of its borrowers are women. In most developing nations like Bangladesh, gender inequality is still a major issue. Grameen Bank helps empower women by mainly providing them with the micro-credit loans, which in turn offers them the opportunity of self-employment and access to money. In addition, reports have proven that the overall impact on development is greater when loans are given to women as opposed to men since women are more likely to use their earnings to improve their living situations and to educate their children. The value of loans starts at $35 and average $200 but mainly depend on the needs of the borrower and her level of credit (based on their previous borrowing and repayment record).

Since the bank’s primary focus is on alleviating poverty rather than generating high returns, interest rates are kept relatively low and as close as possible to commercial rates.

Further Projects

Given its success, Grameen bank has diversified its services among different applications of microcredit. The Village Phone program allows female entrepreneurs to start businesses that provide wireless payphone services in rural areas. The Program has improved the livelihoods of many villagers, farmers and other people who previously did not have access to critical market information and lifeline communications in over 28,000 villages in Bangladesh. Today, more than 55,000 phones are being utilised, with over 80 million people benefiting from access to market information.

In 2003, Grameen Bank launched it struggling members program, exclusively targeted to the beggars in Bangladesh rather than its famous traditional group-based lending scheme. This program distributes small loans to beggars. The loans are interest-free, the repayment period can be arbitrarily long, and the borrower is covered under life insurance free of cost. For example, a beggar taking a small loan of around 100 taka (about US $1.50) may pay back only 2.00 taka (about 3.4 US cents) per week.

Lessons from Grameen Bank’s success

Providing the poor with micro-credit loans can help spur economic growth. Companies such as M-PESA have also implemented the idea of micro-finance in Africa as well. Although they do not function like Grameen Bank, both companies rely on the idea that financial inclusion and helping the poor fulfill their potential is necessary for development. Efforts are being made all over the world to embrace this idea (e.g. Nepal) as it can ultimately help lift the poorest out of poverty.

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In China, Clean Stoves Bring Better Health and Less Emissions - YouTube

http://www.worldbank.org/China - Primitive open fires or poor-quality stoves are still widely used in China for cooking and heating. But the smoke from these...
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Around 3 billion people in the world cook and heat their homes using open fires and simple stoves burning biomass (wood, animal dung and crop waste) and coal. Over 4 million people die prematurely from illness attributable to the household air pollution from cooking with solid fuels. And more than 50% of premature deaths among children under 5 are due to pneumonia caused by particulate matter (soot) inhaled from household air pollution.

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