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Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


Via Seth Dixon
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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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The Pop vs. Soda Page

The Pop vs. Soda Page | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic that is going viral on Facebook right now, so I thought it would be time to link you to the original.  This map isn't just cool, but a great portal to a discussion on regions, diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.
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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.


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João Carreira's comment, September 4, 2012 1:24 PM
...Even as portuguese, I apreceated it very much. Thank you.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 6, 2012 9:30 AM
This movie clip does demonstrate how language is connected not only to space and location but individual or group experiences as well. The languages used by the upper and lower orders in addressing each other or an “outsider” are very distinct within this film. Therefore if you’re socioeconomic status effects the way you speak then perhaps the type of langue you use can indicate what different social groups within a society consider comical or entertaining such as dance and music?
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 9:18 PM
My Fair Lady has always been one of my favorite movies, and it really sparked my interest in linguistics and accents. Not only does your accent define where you’re from physically, but it defines where you’re from socially, as well. While Eliza Doolittle is from the same country, region, and city as Prof Higgins and the people coming out of the theater, she sounds completely different. Right away, her speech gives away what kind of social background she comes from.
Similarly to the “When did Americans lose their British accents?” article, this article helps relay how accents can help define a physical area, and it also shows a connection between accent and economics. Accent is both a cultural and an economic part of geography.