Developing Spatial Literacy
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Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
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'Where Children Sleep'

'Where Children Sleep' | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
James Mollison wanted to portray children's diverse worlds. What better way to do so than to photograph their bedrooms?

 

Pictures with the children and the space they inhabit, creates a more personal touch to geographic context for students.  It builds what I call "geographic empathy," which builds on commonalities, instead of just reinforcing stereotypes.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:06 PM

This article is very interesting as it shows so much cultural difference by just taking pictures of a child's bedroom. The pictures portray the family's wealth, religion, technological advancements, and parenting style. 

 

When you look at the difference between some of the pictures it is horrible. Some of the children have an abundance of toys, while others don't even have their own room or have to sleep on the ground. It is also interesting to see how some pictures portray the person's lifestyle. Some have a very minimalist room with little luxuries, which can be for religious reasons or personal style. 

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The Geography of Underwater Homes

The Geography of Underwater Homes | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
New data from Zillow shows fewer homeowners underwater, but the pattern varies widely by geography.

 

The Sunbelt (especially California and Florida) have the highest percentage of homeowners that are 'underwater' and owe more than the home is worth.  Also hit hard are declining metro areas area of the rust belt. 

Question to ponder: Why would these places be hit the hardest?  


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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. Read the article associated with this map.


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