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Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
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10 Infographics for Earth Day

10 Infographics for Earth Day | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

There’s no better day than Earth Day to learn more about the planet we call home.

To help, we're presenting 10 informative graphic representations of the Earth, providing data, statistics, and information on everything from population density to ocean currents to Twitter connections...


Via Lauren Moss
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3D spatial analysis of air pollution

3D spatial analysis of air pollution | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

"In the Air is a visualization project which aims to make visible the microscopic and invisible agents of Madrid´s air (gases, particles, pollen, diseases, etc), to see how they perform, react and interact with the rest of the city."

 

This takes spatial thinking into the atmosphere...worth exploring especially since the key trends being charted are anthropogenic in nature. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Mapping the Anthropocene

Mapping the Anthropocene | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

As follow-up to an earlier post about how we have enter the age of the Anthropocene, this stunning map is a fantastic visual representation of the forces that merit the dawning of a new geologic age.  This map depicts the lights at night, major roads, railways power lines, oversea cables, airline routes and shipping lanes.  It also expands the areas according to population size.  For more on the production of this map, see the Globaia website: http://globaia.org/en/anthropocene/

 

Spotted on Living Geography: http://livinggeography.blogspot.com/2012/03/new-map-of-anthropocene.html


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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 2:24 PM

Looking at the images above it is understandable that the disappearance of the Aral Sea is known as the greatest environmental disaster (that we are not talking about). The amount of change that has taken place in this area is incomprehensible for the amount of time it has taken. Humans so often do not consider their actions on this planet , I believe what has taken place here is an utter shame.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

Scientists model where and when the debris from the March 2011 Japanese tsunami will be.  The likelihood that the debris (not radioactive) will reach the U.S. west coast is increasingly likely.  Look at the great video attached to the article.   


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:37 PM

An example of how even without considering globalization the world is interconnected. The debris from the 2011 tsunami was never disposed of effectively and the United States may be effected more than they ever expected. If this pile of debris reaches US shores it will make many Americans consider how a tsunami across the globe will eventually hurt them at home. 

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Chesapeake Bay FieldScope

Chesapeake Bay FieldScope | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

The National Geographic Education team has produced a fabulous site that has online GIS tools for understanding the environment of the Cheasapeake Bay watershed. Students can upload their data, click on various layers, and use drawing and measuring tools.  Other "Fieldscope" projects are available as well at: http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/program/fieldscope/  


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