Developing Spatial Literacy
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Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
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Systems of Government by Country

Systems of Government by Country | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
This map shows Systems of Government in the World.

 

This is an excellent tool for comparing political institutions around the world and analyzing regional difference between political systems at a global scale. 


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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:10 AM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:09 PM

As an outsider looking in the concept of the United Kingdom is a little confusing. We are taught to view Scotland as its own country, but they are countries within a larger structure. This video makes what would confuse many Americans and condenses it into a clear video that is just about 5 mins.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 4:38 PM

Many people often interchange the UK, Great Britain, and England, but in reality, they all describe different different things. The UK is a country of four countries, each with equal power, including Scotland, Northern Ireland, England, and Wales but they are all considered British citizens.UK is a political term, describing a country. Great Britain is a physical geographical term describing the land mass containing Scotland, Wales, and England.  The British Isles refers to both Great Britain and the Island of Ireland. All of these terms describe different things, being characterized by either political affiliation or geographic characteristics. 

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Defining an Independent Nation

Defining an Independent Nation | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
While the terms country, state, and nation are often used interchangeably, there is a difference.

 

A straightforward explanation of important vocabulary terms for a political geography unit. 

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:54 PM

(Europe topic 6)

The contrast between these 3 terms (and combinations of them) has always been confusing to me, and I'd assume many others as well. Though this video explains fairly well the differences in definitions, I don't think that they have been consistently used as accurately as possible. Though terms like United Nations and the Navajo Nation seem to make sense to me, "one nation under God," as taken from the  Allegiance, might arguably be a technicality. Though the American spirit can be considered to have formed its own nation, there is undoubtedly a multitude of nations within (or at least partially in) the United States. (I'm not disagreeing with the phrase, but just thought it was worth mentioning during this time when the world has changed so much since its inception) Also, what is considered a nation by one group is not necessarily acknowledged by another, and this is what can lead to miscommunications, loss in translation, and arguably tensions, with the Middle East serving as a good example.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:04 PM

This short video does a great job of explaining the differences between these terms. Often they are wrongly used interchangeably while in reality they have distinct meanings and cannot simply be swapped out for another.

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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


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