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Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
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'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded

'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

I'm pleased to announce that for GIS Day, I created a map that has hyperlinks to regionally specific posts that I put on 'Geography Education.'  This map was created using ArcGIS Online (here's a free tutorial on how to to use ArcGIS Online tailored for K-12 educators).  This is just another way to search for materials on this site.  Feel free to embed this map on your webpage or share the link.  I'll add more tags in the future as well (just click on the icon to get a pop-up, then click on the image to see the posts).  Happy GIS Day!


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Jamie Strickland's comment, November 16, 2012 9:15 AM
How cool is this!! This will make it even easier to teach my World Regional and Global Connections courses! Thanks, Seth.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:40 AM
Overall I think this is a good map. There are a few countries that I think could have better abbreviations, North Korea for example is labeled "N" and South Korea is labeled "SK". I went and looked for an "NK" label and there wasn't one. The map is flawed in that way because of the shortage of tools the program gives you to use. The shortage of tools also leads to many places with the same globe image or same lettering as other places. I think you did a good job with what you had available to use.
Charles Matley's comment, November 19, 2012 11:46 AM
This map is great. I The use of the national geographic map makes it more manageable and appealing to the eye. The categorization of posts into geographic locations is very clever. It could potentially be viewed as more "fun" because it is interactive.
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Global data geovisualized

Global data geovisualized | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Learn about the world by changing the familiar map. Select a subject from the top menu and watch the map resize. A countrys total area no longer represents land mass, but items relevant to the subject (i.e.

 

The geovisualization in this interactive map is outstanding (translation: I could play with this all day).  This displayed map shows the destination countries for migrants, with links to the data and information to read up on the topic.  Truly impressive.   For the live link, see: http://show.mappingworlds.com//world/?lang=EN


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The Pop vs. Soda Page

The Pop vs. Soda Page | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic that is going viral on Facebook right now, so I thought it would be time to link you to the original.  This map isn't just cool, but a great portal to a discussion on regions, diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 9, 2014 11:44 PM

Unit 1

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Sporcle: Geography Quizzes

Sporcle: Geography Quizzes | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
The best trivia games and quizzes on the internet.

 

With over 800 games and quizzes on this site with varying skill levels, there is something for everyone here.  Some are standard quizzes such as "European Countries" or "Asian capital cities."  However some get you to reorganize your global knowledge in ways you've never considered.  For example, What is the most populous city in the world for each given time zone (not that easy right)? 

 


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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. I.C.

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The Geography of Drug Trafficking

The Geography of Drug Trafficking | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Web Site... 

 

Afghanistan and Burma (a.k.a.-Myanmar) are the world's leading producers of the illicit narcotic of heroin.  What environmental, political, developmental and cultural factors play a role in these distribution networks?  What geographic factors contribution to the production of these drugs to be located in these particular places?  Follow the link for a map of global cocaine distribution patterns.   


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 5, 2012 10:44 PM
Favorable environmental factors such as mountainous terrain, helps isolate and conceal these regions which creates conditions that makes the production of heroin and cocaine easier. Since you can’t conquer the environment, the best alternative may be further international cooperation to hinder drug trafficking and production.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 10:54 AM
The second half of this article shows just how crucial of a part Mexico plays in the drug trade. Most of the cocaine that comes from the Andean region is pushed up through Mexico and the Carribean only 17 tons are sold in Mexico while 165 tons are distributed into the United States. The US makes up 40% of global cocaine consumption, leaving a huge opportunity open to Mexico.
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OverlapMaps - compare any two places

OverlapMaps - compare any two places | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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This week, Samoa will skip Friday

This week, Samoa will skip Friday | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

"Just this once, Samoa is making Dec. 30 disappear."

 

I hope you enjoy your Friday, because they won't in Samoa.  It didn't even happen, since they've canceled Friday Dec. 30th and just skipped straight to Dec 31st.  This would make no sense without an understanding of the International Date Line and the regional economic networks of Oceania.  Since Samoa's economy in tightly connected to New Zealand and Australia (on the 'other' side of the IDL) it's financially beneficial to have their work weeks line up to faciliate same day communications and business interactions.   For more see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-12-29/samoa-time-zone-jump/3751254 and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/30/world/asia/samoa-to-skip-friday-and-switch-time-zones.html?ref=sethmydans


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 2014 2:20 PM

I agree with the decision Samoa made to switch to the West side of the International Date Line. By doing this, the country completely skipped a day. Also, years ago Samoa switched from driving on the right side of the road (American style) to the left side (British style). They made these changes because their economy is connected to countries on the other side of the IDL, such as Australia and New Zealand.  

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:10 AM

Samoa and its neighbor Tokelau decided to undergo a time change that would align them with their Asian trading partners. With this new time zone, Samoa will be three hours ahead of eastern Australia as opposed to being 21 hours behind and 22 hours ahead of California, rather than the previous 2 hours it was behind it. In the Pacific, this tactic of shifting time is not unusual as many island nations have, at one point or another, shifted time zones, date lines, and daylight savings times. This move will make it much easier for Samoa to do business with Australia and New Zealand, which is important because their economies are linked closely to the rest of Asia, especially China. Samoa's prime minister explicitly stated that these economic factors were the driving forces behind this time change decision and the decision had nothing to do with trying to be the first country to enter the new year. I was surprised that a country could just decide this type of change at any point, but there seems to be no legal reason why a country could not do that. Whatever time zone a country feels it should enter it can, but telling the citizens about such a change seems like it would be hard to do. When everyone is accustomed to a certain time zone, I feel like making this change can have an effect on people especially those who travel. Getting used to a new time zone seems like it would take time to adjust to, but I guess for island nations in the Pacific, this is no new phenomenon as others have already engaged in these moves.

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 12:41 PM

Samoa is making a lot of changes.  Just reading about the time zone switch called for the need to focus on the switches.  I understand they want to stay up with business times in Brisbane.  The PM switched the driving side from right to left to be inline with New Zealand and Australia.  Now the PM is going to try to change the flag.  Maybe Samoa is making a few too many changes.  Where's the cultural identity going?  

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Next Supercontinent Will Amaze You

Next Supercontinent Will Amaze You | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Fifty million to 200 million years from now, geologists expect Earth's continents to smash together into one big supercontinent, just as they've done repeatedly in our planet's distant past — and a new computer model suggests that the Arctic Ocean...

 

This graphic displays the fluidity of the plate tectonic systems, and instead of thinking about what happened during the era of the dinosaurs, looking into the future provides an interesting perspective the dynamism of Earth systems (Disclaimer: this is one possibility on what might happen, there are other possible outcomes).  In human geography, I use this map to discussion the concept of region: regions are not static, but the the Earth is put together is (sometimes literally) shifting beneath our feet. 


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 1:12 AM

The continental drift shows that 225 million years ago, Africa, Asia & Europe, North America and South America were touching while Antarctica and Australia were really close to those 5 continents. These 7 continents together were known as Pangea. 125 million years later North America, Africa and Europe elevated north in terms of latitude but to sum it up, North America, South America, Africa and Europe all drifted north in the world. Let's jump ahead 50 million to 200 million years from now. North America, South America, Europe and Africa can quite possibly all drift northward. As for Asia, the only difference between 225 million years ago and now is that Asia drifted east and barely drifted north. Also, I feel that Australia will barely make it to the equator since it barely drifted northward throughout the past 225 million years.

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TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning

TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This resource is a comprehensive approach to teaching spatial thinking skills. Terms with spatial reference (i.e.-place, diffusion, migration, situation, scale, region, centrality, proximity, etc.) are defined within their spatial context and related to their multiple curricular connections such as Life Science, Physical Science, Earth Science and (of course) Geography. These terms and concepts then link you to teaching resources, online modules, lesson plans and classroom activities. While useful for all units, this is especially useful for the beginning of a course to teach the importance of spatial thinking skills to then have them permeate the rest of the year. 


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Regional Geography

Making the connections...

 

Thinking geographically is in essence about making the connections between themes, across regions and at a variety of scales.  


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Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


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Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
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The Geography of Charitable Giving

Ever wonder how charitable the people are who live in your area? It turns out that lower-income people tend to donate a much bigger share of their discretionary incomes than wealthier people, according to a new study.

 

Questions to ponder: What are some reasons that Providence RI is the 'least charitable' metropolitan area in the United States according to this data?  Why is the state of Utah ranked as the 'most charitable state?'  Why are the bottom 3 states all in the New England region? 


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