Developing Spatia...
Follow
Find tag "mapping"
351 views | +0 today
Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded

'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

I'm pleased to announce that for GIS Day, I created a map that has hyperlinks to regionally specific posts that I put on 'Geography Education.'  This map was created using ArcGIS Online (here's a free tutorial on how to to use ArcGIS Online tailored for K-12 educators).  This is just another way to search for materials on this site.  Feel free to embed this map on your webpage or share the link.  I'll add more tags in the future as well (just click on the icon to get a pop-up, then click on the image to see the posts).  Happy GIS Day!


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jamie Strickland's comment, November 16, 2012 9:15 AM
How cool is this!! This will make it even easier to teach my World Regional and Global Connections courses! Thanks, Seth.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:40 AM
Overall I think this is a good map. There are a few countries that I think could have better abbreviations, North Korea for example is labeled "N" and South Korea is labeled "SK". I went and looked for an "NK" label and there wasn't one. The map is flawed in that way because of the shortage of tools the program gives you to use. The shortage of tools also leads to many places with the same globe image or same lettering as other places. I think you did a good job with what you had available to use.
Charles Matley's comment, November 19, 2012 11:46 AM
This map is great. I The use of the national geographic map makes it more manageable and appealing to the eye. The categorization of posts into geographic locations is very clever. It could potentially be viewed as more "fun" because it is interactive.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

MapMaker-National Geographic Education

MapMaker-National Geographic Education | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Customize one-page maps and download, email, print, or share!

 

Want to make a custom map don't have a cartographic background or access to GIS software?  This online program will give you what you need. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping functional distance: the communte

Mapping functional distance: the communte | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

As described by Manu Fernandez, "MySociety developed this project that perfectly illustrates the utility of georeferenced data. Mapumental tool displays the travel time to reach a certain point from anywhere in the city, thereby helping to understand the temporal distance mobility, a much more useful and practical information than just physical distance."

 

This type of mapping shows the Space-Time Compression as well as the unevenness of that compression.  Why are some areas 'functionally closer?'  What makes some places 'functionally farther apart?'   How do technology, density and infrastructure influence this phenomenon?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
juanchosierrar's comment, December 19, 2011 5:10 AM
Excellent application of isochronism in geomarketing studies have great use with them we know the areas of influence at 5, 10 or 15 min.

This tool in combination with demographic data can be known potential areas of my future clients.

Currently working with a company in which we develop these products. I leave you some examples of isochrones lins.

http://cartoo.dyndns.org/

http://cabsa.wordpress.com/2011/11/24/geomarketing-areas-de-influencia-con-winab/

adeu
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 27, 2013 10:19 PM

This type of mapping shows the Space-Time Compression as well as the unevenness of that compression.  Why are some areas 'functionally closer?'  What makes some places 'functionally farther apart?'   How do technology, density and infrastructure influence this phenomenon?

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

HealthMap | Global Health, Local Knowledge

HealthMap | Global Health, Local Knowledge | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

How is drought in East Africa impacting the spread of diseases?  Is flu season hitting your city particularly hard this year?  Where are the disease problems the worst?  All of these question can be answered (in part) by these helpful maps. This site, which depends on crowdsourced data, may need to few more users before it's database is robust enough, but the idea of it is quite amibitious. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

Very cool way to explore the colder realms of our planet.  This web-based "Google Earth-like" resource comes preloaded with layers  (ice extent, temperature, permafrost, biogeography, etc.) that would make for a great interactive lesson for many grade levels. 


Via Carla Saunders, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural?

The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural? | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 5:04 PM
The system works fine as is. Maybe down the line, when it would be far easier to quickly change the global coordinate system, this thing would be feasible. Now, though, it would needlessly entail a huge amount of labor. Just think of all the PRINTED materials which could cause confusion. You would have to change out EVERY chart on EVERY seagoing vessel in the WORLD. That, all by itself, is an enormous task, and in some areas would be economically prohibitive. Charts are NOT cheap. In the future, when everything is linked up and digital, it would be much easier. Now it would be a disaster. Some people don't think things through.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive Map: Economic Stress Index

Interactive Map: Economic Stress Index | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This is a great interactive feature focusing on the differential impacts of the economic downturn on particular places.  You can zoom in, see county-level data, and slide the time bar at the bottom to get spatiotemporal data.    


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Map Of Your City’s Invisible Neighborhoods, According To Foursquare

A Map Of Your City’s Invisible Neighborhoods, According To Foursquare | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Every city is filled with different neighborhoods, but often, you won’t find these places on any map. They’re word-of-mouth zoning distinctions known only to locals.

 

How do you define the borders of a neighborhood?  This intiguing look at the social media platform FourSquare to mathematically find like-minded individuals that share spatial patterns.  Interestingly, the digital map with algorithms lined up with residents mental maps.  What types of regions are these?  How come? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Early World Maps

Early World Maps | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

I typically would not link to a Wikipedia article, but this one is not only well crafted, but represents an academic collaborative work in its own right.  This a fabulous cartographic gallery that explores the history of geographical thought through the ages (as archived in the earliest maps).  Enjoy the maps, and even more, the intellectual context that this article provides for each of these images.      


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

OverlapMaps - compare any two places

OverlapMaps - compare any two places | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Régine Ballonad-Berthois's curator insight, February 23, 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

GIS for home buyers

GIS for home buyers | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Whoa, check out Trulia Local - A visual way to explore crime, schools, home prices, and local data.

 

The map above was generated to display the areas within a 30 minute commute of Rhode Island College in Providence.  This site generates commuting maps and other layers that are especially pertinent for home buyers---schools, crime stats, property values and local amenities.  This is GIS data brought to the real estate shopping community, but consider this a project in the making.  One of the best exercises to get to know a place holistically is to shop for housing and make some locational analysis decisions.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global data geovisualized

Global data geovisualized | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Learn about the world by changing the familiar map. Select a subject from the top menu and watch the map resize. A countrys total area no longer represents land mass, but items relevant to the subject (i.e.

 

The geovisualization in this interactive map is outstanding (translation: I could play with this all day).  This displayed map shows the destination countries for migrants, with links to the data and information to read up on the topic.  Truly impressive.   For the live link, see: http://show.mappingworlds.com//world/?lang=EN


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Day vs. Night population maps

Day vs. Night population maps | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

A great image for showing the pulsating rythmns of a dynamic urban system.  We treat population density as a static metric, but how many people are in a given place would truly be difficult to fully quantify.  What logisitic difficulties would this shift present for cities?  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Wildcardspades58's comment, December 16, 2011 11:44 AM
I would be interested to find out how these were created and how the data was recorded.
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 10:44 AM
There is not much Definiton on this map......
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Puzzles that Make Geography Fun

Puzzles that Make Geography Fun | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

"Ever since London mapmaker and engraver John Spilsbury pasted one of his maps on a sheet of hardwood and cut it into small pieces with a marquetry saw (circa 1760), jigsaw puzzles have been used as a tool to teach children geography. Today, they are still a fun way for kids to learn more about their own country as well as the nations of the world."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bike-Share GPS Data to Help Plan NYC Network

Bike-Share GPS Data to Help Plan NYC Network | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This map of bike-share trips in D.C. reveals plenty about cycling patterns in the city, but New York City's data will be far more robust, including exact routes for each trip.

 

Here’s one more reason to get excited about the launch of bike-share later this year: the reams of data generated by the GPS units located in every public bicycle. The Department of Transportation will use that data to inform their bike lane planning, commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan revealed last night .

 


Via Lauren Moss, Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Spatial History Project

Spatial History Project | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

The Spatial History Project at Stanford puts together some fantastic geovisualization that is an awesome site that allows you or your kids to spatial and temporally the diffusion of Nazi concentration camps.  It has some clickable 'GIS-like' layers to help students contextualize the data and to make some important interdisciplinary connections.  Originally spotted on http://ushistoryeducatorblog.blogspot.com/


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Distance To McDonald’s

Distance To McDonald’s | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This map answers a few simple questions:  How far away is the nearest McDonald's?  Where is the concentration of McDonald's highest or lowest?  While population density is the immediate pattern that we identify, what else can this map show us?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:27 AM
Diffusion and globalization are truly forces to be reckoned with.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Chesapeake Bay FieldScope

Chesapeake Bay FieldScope | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

The National Geographic Education team has produced a fabulous site that has online GIS tools for understanding the environment of the Cheasapeake Bay watershed. Students can upload their data, click on various layers, and use drawing and measuring tools.  Other "Fieldscope" projects are available as well at: http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/program/fieldscope/  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

One Island, Two Countries

One Island, Two Countries | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Divided islands, like Market in the Baltic Sea, conform to a version of Sayre's law: the smaller the territory, the more confusing the border.

 

In the latest chapter of the Borderlines series in the New York Times, explores the smallest divided island with characteristic insight, humor and intellectual eclecticism.  "Borders allow humankind to separate what nature has united. But an island is a naturally closed entity. Its shoreline is the boundary of the bubble separating it from the rest of the world. And then impose a human-made barrier on an island? What is the meaning of isolation — a word derived, in fact, from the Latin for island — if you have to share it with someone else?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter

Soda vs. Pop with Twitter | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
One of the great things about Twitter is that it’s a global conversation anyone can join anytime. Eavesdropping on the world, what what!

 

While many educators have been using http://popvssoda.com/ to show the linguistic regions in the United States, this is a similar map, with the added social media component.  To map out these regions, the cartographer used the word choice on geo-tagged tweets as the data source.  For another twitter, map, the following link shows which regions are most actively engaged on Twitter: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/top-countries-on-twitter_n_1653915.html

What do these regions show us?  What types of regions are these?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Chris W's comment, August 27, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a really cool use of twitter! I use the term soda, which most of the northeast uses as well.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 14, 2013 10:35 PM
Twitter is something that is becoming widely used, and is something I usually check everyday. I never really thought of twitter beyond advertising and communicating. It is amazing the kind of data that can be extracted from peoples tweets. In the soda vs. pop argument I would say soda which makes sense since the data shows that people in the Northeast refer to it as soda. Twitter is so current that you can actually get some current and accurate data just from reading the hash tags in peoples tweets. It's amazing that such information can be extracted from all around the world.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
Rescooped by Greenroom Dweller from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gerrymandering 101

This video is a good primer to show before the ReDistricting Game (http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/2214122954/the-redistricting-game ).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.