Developing Spatial Literacy
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Developing Spatial Literacy
Learning the spatial skills of Geography
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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Body Mass Index (BMI) by Country

Body Mass Index (BMI) by Country | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
This map shows World trends in age-standardized mean Body Mass Index (BMI) 199 countries over 28 years. The worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, according to a project that tracked risk factors for heart disease and stroke.

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke...

 

Where is Coca Cola produced?  Some products are bulk losing some are bulk gaining in the manufacturing process.  Coca Cola and their containers represent bulk gaining products.  Although not the focus of this video, what is the geography behind where these factories are located?  How would this geographic pattern change if this were are bulk losing industry?  What are examples of bulk gaining and bulk losing industries?  Why are glass bottles not manufactured in the United States? 


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Madison Roth's curator insight, January 20, 7:58 PM
This video relates to my current AP human geography class because we are learning about industries and it is speaking of the coke industry. This, more specifically, is a bulk-gaining industry and is placed strategically based on all factors (situation and site). I think that the coca-cola industries are growing rapidly as stated in the video. Also, that the plants are placed nicely (closer to consumers to avoid transportation costs) taking into consideration the amount of coke needed to be produced and the countless factories relative to each other.
Angel Peeples's curator insight, January 20, 8:03 PM
  This is related to world cultural geography by being an industry. A industry is a economic activity concerned with the processing of raw materials and manufacture of goods in factories. Coca Cola is a huge industry that makes billions of dollars a year, 1.6 billion people reaches for a coca cola a day! This industry is a bulk gaining industry, the ingredients don't weight that much but when you put it all together it weighs quite a lot because of this the transportation cost would be to great for going a long distance so they must be closer to the markets instead of the inputs. This article is mostly about how Coca Cola is made and about all the factories worldwide to meet their growing demand.   
Rebecca Cooler's curator insight, January 20, 9:45 PM
This article relates to the topic because in human geography industries are described as either bulk gaining or bulk reducing. My opinion on the topic is that this would be a bulk gaining industry because it's adding bulk.
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Distance To McDonald’s

Distance To McDonald’s | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This map answers a few simple questions:  How far away is the nearest McDonald's?  Where is the concentration of McDonald's highest or lowest?  While population density is the immediate pattern that we identify, what else can this map show us?   


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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:27 AM
Diffusion and globalization are truly forces to be reckoned with.
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International Fast Food Consumption

International Fast Food Consumption | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it

This cartogram shows the distribution of one major fast food outlet brand (McDonalds's). By 2004 there were 30,496 of these McDonald's worldwide with 45% located in the United States.  The next highest number of these outlets are in Japan, Canada and Germany.

 

The world average number of outlets of this one brand alone is 5 per million people. In the United States there are 47 per million people; in Argentina and Chile the rate is a tenth of the American rate; the rate in Indonesia, China and Georgia is a hundredth of the American rate. In all the territories of Africa there were only 150 outlets: mostly in South Africa.  What does this say about consumption, economics, development, globalization and branding? Search http://worldmapper.org for more excellent cartograms. 


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:08 AM

No wonder America is the biggest one. People here are mostly too busy to prepare proper food for their diet. Is easier and more efficient just stop by and go back to work as soon as possibly. 

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A Tip for Restaurant Investors: Study the Demographics

A Tip for Restaurant Investors: Study the Demographics | Developing Spatial Literacy | Scoop.it
The most successful investors in restaurants consider how a style fits an area and track who their customers are, said Hudson Riehle of the National Restaurant Association.

 

A successful business model for restaurants is about much more than quality food at an affordable price.  Ask your students: what geographic factors are important in starting a restaurant?  What variables might make an otherwise attractive location less appealing?  What would ensure a return on your investment? 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 8:42 PM
It's always important to consider an investment, especially one as great as a restaurant. Like Mr. Ruban said "be prepared to lose the money". You can't possibly foresee all the problems that will occur, but one of the best ways to increase profit is to pay attention to your demographic. Cater to the audience you wish to bring in, and do so in the right area, that will greatly increase your chances of success.