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Researchers create cloud-based brain for robots | GigaOM Tech News

Researchers create cloud-based brain for robots | GigaOM Tech News | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

A group of European researchers has released the first version of a cloud computing platform for robots that will help them take advantage of powerful virtual resources. Essentially, they’re treating robots like any other device — desktop, tablet or mobile phone — running web applications, only robots can learn from each other and can do a lot more than just update screen displays.

 

The project, carried out by a team at ETH Zurich, is called RoboEarth and its linchpin is a cloud software platform called Rapyuta. The way it works is pretty simple at a high level: robots communicate with a cloud-based application platform that carries out computation tasks and connects to a cloud database full of information such as maps, images, language, as well as to other web services. The robots themselves are pretty much hardware terminals equipped with sensors and moving parts but limited on-board processing power or data storage.

 

This, of course, is an idea that has been with us since the mainframe computer and continues today via cloud computing and web and mobile applications. Why limit a device to its own physical capabilities when there’s an infinite (although, in the case of mainframes, not so much) expanse of computing power, memory, storage and data available in the ether? As long as the device has a strong internet connection, it doesn’t need a massive hard drive or the latest, greatest processor.

 

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The Future of Information Technology
The most important developing technologies in the Information technology industry based on current trends; such as artificial intelligence, augmented reality, mobile computing, cloud computing and fibre optic.
Curated by Lionel Doherty
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Laser puts record data rate through fiber

Laser puts record data rate through fiber | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers have set a new record for the rate of data transfer using a single laser: 26 terabits per second.

 

At those speeds, the contents of nearly 1,000 high-definition DVDs could be sent down an optical fibre in a second.

 

The trick is to use what is known as a "fast Fourier transform" to unpick more than 300 separate colours of light in a laser beam, each encoded with its own string of information.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Unhackable telecom networks a step closer

Unhackable telecom networks a step closer | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers have come up with a way of protecting telecoms networks using quantum cryptography without the need for expensive dedicated optical fibre links.

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The Future is in the Cloud: Ubiquitous Computing

The Future is in the Cloud: Ubiquitous Computing | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
In the near future (or the future is here today?) the gadgets you are currently using will become obsolete.

Via Richard Kastelein & Adriana Hamacher
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Thomas Shaw's curator insight, March 22, 2013 4:39 AM

I agree that cloud technology in the next five to ten years could possibly be the main storage for all of our data. Not only does this guarantee that our information is backed up, it means you don't need to carry your information around on devices anymore such as USB sticks or external hard drives.

 

The only downside at the moment is that memory and storage is not free and is very limited, not to mention that we are relying on the speed of our internet connection to download the files from the cloud in the first place.

 

I think technology like this will become even more efficient once data storage will no longer be an issue, being that it will be very cheap for copious amount of memory and in addition faster connection to the cloud so that when downloading the file from the cloud it will be like you are not downloading it at all, rather just opening the file as if it already existed on your device.

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Microsoft's Cloud Computing Strategy and Roadmap Evident at Convergence 2013 - Forbes

Microsoft's Cloud Computing Strategy and Roadmap Evident at Convergence 2013 - Forbes | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Kirill Tatarinov’s keynote this morning at Microsoft’s Convergence 2013 marks a subtle, yet very significant shift in how this technology leader is marketing itself to partners and the outside world.  They are humanizing their marketing, messaging...

Via Peter Azzopardi
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Major corporations like Microsoft are becoming more and more involved with the development of cloud-based storage and computing, making it one of the most important developing technologies.

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Peter Azzopardi's curator insight, March 20, 2013 3:03 PM

Although it is a bit early to call, hard to imagine MS not being there amongst the front runners once the market has formed.

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2013 RX? Inject Your Mobile Strategy With A Good Dose Of Cloud

2013 RX? Inject Your Mobile Strategy With A Good Dose Of Cloud | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Bill Laberis, Editorial Editor for Enterprise CIO Forum, recently posted a video called “Cloud-enable your mobile strategy.” I believe these two technology trends, mobile and cloud, will fundamentally change computing over the next ten years.


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Researchers create cloud-based brain for robots | GigaOM Tech News

Researchers create cloud-based brain for robots | GigaOM Tech News | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

A group of European researchers has released the first version of a cloud computing platform for robots that will help them take advantage of powerful virtual resources. Essentially, they’re treating robots like any other device — desktop, tablet or mobile phone — running web applications, only robots can learn from each other and can do a lot more than just update screen displays.

 

The project, carried out by a team at ETH Zurich, is called RoboEarth and its linchpin is a cloud software platform called Rapyuta. The way it works is pretty simple at a high level: robots communicate with a cloud-based application platform that carries out computation tasks and connects to a cloud database full of information such as maps, images, language, as well as to other web services. The robots themselves are pretty much hardware terminals equipped with sensors and moving parts but limited on-board processing power or data storage.

 

This, of course, is an idea that has been with us since the mainframe computer and continues today via cloud computing and web and mobile applications. Why limit a device to its own physical capabilities when there’s an infinite (although, in the case of mainframes, not so much) expanse of computing power, memory, storage and data available in the ether? As long as the device has a strong internet connection, it doesn’t need a massive hard drive or the latest, greatest processor.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Live Blog: The Next Five Years Of IT

Live Blog: The Next Five Years Of IT | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
What are the key trends that will change the way IT pros work over the next five years, and how will server and data centre technology evolve? Gartner...
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The Future of Information: Touchscreens EVERYWHERE!

The Future of Information: Touchscreens EVERYWHERE! | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Digital interfaces are going big -- so big pretty soon we might not be able to distinguish between what's real and what's fake, whether we're talking about ads on the street or the reflection in the mirror.
Lionel Doherty's insight:

The extreme versatility of touchscreens, I believe, will allow them to become more and more frequently used in everyday life.

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Microsoft's tame view of the digital future | CNET News

Microsoft's tame view of the digital future | CNET News | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Microsoft has a vision for the future. People interact with large digital screens via voice and touch, presumably running future versions of Windows and Skype. For example, recipes are suggested based on what's in the refrigerator, and a video hosted by a professional chef walks a novice cook through the steps of making a dish. In another example, grandma can read bedtime stories to the grandkids remotely via a large screen.

 

The scenarios are part of a video showcasing Microsoft's new Envisioning Center, which opened this month on the company's Redmond, Wash., campus. The Envisioning Center is aimed at "imagining how technology could be used to make life easier and more enjoyable, sometimes in small ways and sometimes in revolutionary ones," according to Microsoft's Steve Clayton. He cautions that the ideas in the video are not meant to be predictive about Microsoft's future products.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Artificial Intelligence Engineers Create Child-Like “Roboy” to Service Humans

Artificial Intelligence Engineers Create Child-Like “Roboy” to Service Humans | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

The Artificial Intelligence Lab (AIL) at the University of Zurich is the home to a 1.2m tall robot namedRoboy. He is modeled after the anatomy of a 2 – 3 year old child and uses artificial “tendons” to move about. Researchers hope to have Roboy operational by 2013 and unveiled at the Robots on Tour event in Zurich.

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Bridget Walters's curator insight, March 21, 2013 2:39 AM

Assisted by scientists and engineers to creat tendon-controlled motor technology that mimics the flexiblility of fibrous collaen tissues attached to muscles and bone in thehuman body. 'Roboy', is made of "soft-tissue" technology, and is hoped that, developments such as the advancement in synthetic skin for prosthetics will be made in the next 5-10 years. This type of AI system's developments in the near future could could asist with such things as:

• Delivering meals
• Cleaning floors
• Mowing lawns
• Acting as companion robots


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Artificial intelligence: Job killer or your next boss? | ZDNet

Artificial intelligence: Job killer or your next boss? | ZDNet | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

As software automates an increasing number of tasks, is it time to reassess traditional workplace roles and create an office that suits both man and machine?


Via LeapMind
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Nathan Heath's curator insight, March 23, 6:46 PM

Information technology may very well be becoming an engine of unemployment as automating roles that once used scores of human workers are potentially the cheaper and more efficient alternative.

 

The future goal in the workplace is to have humans and machines to work not against but alongside one another to create the a cheap and successful work environment.

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Orwellian Google augmented reality glasses - Signs of the Times

Orwellian Google augmented reality glasses - Signs of the Times | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Google glasses will make us all agents for Google. Nick Pickles, Director of Big Brother Watch, says the implications for privacy are profoundly worrying. In the online world - for now, at least - it's the advertisers that make the ...

Via Pekka Puhakka
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James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 2:38 AM

The first step to cybernetics it seems.

 

Raises concerns about privacy, even moreso in such a company as Google. GPS tracking, photographic data, online roaming data and many others gives access to information about users and possibly non-purchasers as bystanders are recorded with the gadget.

 

This particular article is lacking but focuses on the disadvatages of such a device.

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Apple Sets Sights on Augmented Reality for iOS Devices

Apple Sets Sights on Augmented Reality for iOS Devices | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Apple won a patent for an augmented reality system that combines the real world with computer-generated imagery. Could this be the future of iOS devices?

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The importance of full fibre broadband | thinkbroadband

The importance of full fibre broadband | thinkbroadband | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Over the past three days, thousands of delegates have gathered in London for the FTTH Councils' Fibre-to-the-Home Conference at Excel in London. This event has been designed to bring together network operators, equipment suppliers, contractors, policy-makers and investors to help promote FTTH adoption across the EU.

 

When we talk about fibre-optic broadband in the UK, we usually mean fibre-to-the-cabinet (FTTC) 'hybrid' solutions rather than fibre-to-the-home/building/premises (FTTH/FTTB/FTTP), the so called 'full fibre' solution. Most of the rollout by BT, and all the Virgin Media fibre services are at present based on FTTC, using a copper cable (telephone twisted pair in the case of BT or coax in the case of Virgin) to connect the home to the nearest fibre distribution point, a street cabinet within a few hundred metres of the premises usually. Alongside some limited rollout by BT, a number of niche operators in the UK are rolling out FTTH and FTTB focussing on new-build properties in cities as well as some rural projects.

 

The FTTH Council released its bi-annual market report which revealed the state of fibre adoption across Europe, and confirming that an increasing gap was developing between countries pushing ahead with fibre and those lagging behind. This should be of concern to government (who were absent) as there is some evidence that ultra-fast broadband connectivity is a key driver of economic development by promoting a start-up culture according to keynote speaker Alexander Bard.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Fibre to drive global broadband revenue growth to 2018 | telecoms.com

Fibre to drive global broadband revenue growth to 2018 | telecoms.com | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

The global fixed broadband market generated service revenues of $188bn in 2012, up 7 per cent from 2011, and is set to continue growing to reach $251bn by 2018, according to US firm ABI Research.

 

Last year, fibre broadband had its strongest ever year in terms of service revenues (up 24 per cent), while DSL and cable broadband revenues rose two per cent and six per  cent respectively.

 

Fibre-optic broadband is expected to grow stronger than other platforms throughout the forecast period.

 

In 2018, fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) revenue should reach $81.6bn, representing almost one-third of global broadband service revenue.

 

There was some less good news in the report though – average revenue per user (ARPU) has continued to decline across all broadband platforms over the past few years.

 

“The trend is expected to endure as the majority of operators are trying to offer lower prices to capture a larger market share,” said Jake Saunders, VP and practice director of core forecasting at ABI Research.


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How Cloud Computing Could Be the Future of Education

How Cloud Computing Could Be the Future of Education | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Access to user analysis and data means that such a system can constantly develop and ensure that the designs of its products is working, both for users and the education system.


Via vptechnodork, Faiz A.H, Alfredo Calderon
Lionel Doherty's insight:

The education system is becoming extremely involved with information technologies such as tablet computers and notebooks for students. Cloud computing will facilitate many significant developments and advances in the possibilities for education.

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Nathan Heath's curator insight, March 23, 7:01 PM

With the use of cloud computing, education will be easier to access and completed giving the teacher all hours of the day to give feedback to the students.

 

This technology will change the way large classes can interact with their teachers.

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The importance of full fibre broadband | thinkbroadband

The importance of full fibre broadband | thinkbroadband | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Over the past three days, thousands of delegates have gathered in London for the FTTH Councils' Fibre-to-the-Home Conference at Excel in London. This event has been designed to bring together network operators, equipment suppliers, contractors, policy-makers and investors to help promote FTTH adoption across the EU.

 

When we talk about fibre-optic broadband in the UK, we usually mean fibre-to-the-cabinet (FTTC) 'hybrid' solutions rather than fibre-to-the-home/building/premises (FTTH/FTTB/FTTP), the so called 'full fibre' solution. Most of the rollout by BT, and all the Virgin Media fibre services are at present based on FTTC, using a copper cable (telephone twisted pair in the case of BT or coax in the case of Virgin) to connect the home to the nearest fibre distribution point, a street cabinet within a few hundred metres of the premises usually. Alongside some limited rollout by BT, a number of niche operators in the UK are rolling out FTTH and FTTB focussing on new-build properties in cities as well as some rural projects.

 

The FTTH Council released its bi-annual market report which revealed the state of fibre adoption across Europe, and confirming that an increasing gap was developing between countries pushing ahead with fibre and those lagging behind. This should be of concern to government (who were absent) as there is some evidence that ultra-fast broadband connectivity is a key driver of economic development by promoting a start-up culture according to keynote speaker Alexander Bard.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Everything will be connected to the Internet | CNN Money

Everything will be connected to the Internet | CNN Money | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

In January, I attended the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

 

Much of the talk among economists and business leaders focused on austerity, inequality, and other anxiety inducers. There was, however, a set of more optimistic conversations going on that can be summed up in three vowels: IoE, or the Internet of Everything.

 

Networking giant Cisco Systems estimates that in 2000 there were about 200 million "things," mostly computers, connected via the Internet. Now the number is about 10 billion, from smartphones to climate-control systems to sensors on truck pallets.

 

As cloud storage, mobile computing, and data analysis expand, Cisco CEO John Chambers argued at Davos, we'll experience an even bigger transition in how many "things" are connected to the Internet -- nearly everything -- and in how they work.

 

Click headline to read more and watch video clip--


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The Future Of Mobile Computing by Callil Capuozzo

The Future Of Mobile Computing by Callil Capuozzo | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
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Patrick Purcell's curator insight, March 21, 2013 8:38 PM

This article looks at what ideas companies have for the future of mobile computing. 

Alex Shirlaw's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:14 PM

This article talks about mobile phone technology that can "learn from use", and "change over time". Capuozzo is clearly trying to communicate that mobile technology is going to continuously become smarter and more intelligent until it is comparable with that of the human brain. The technological evolution is inevitable, not only in mobile computing but in any kind of technology - the only constraint, is time.

Modeah Hariri's curator insight, March 24, 2013 7:51 AM

I like it

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InAVate - Dynamic, tactile touch screens are the future

InAVate - Dynamic, tactile touch screens are the future | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Audio visual technology solutions for an integrated world
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Microsoft's little-screen, big-screen interactive future - CNET

Microsoft's little-screen, big-screen interactive future - CNET | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
Microsoft's little-screen, big-screen interactive future
CNET
Those large Microsoft vertical touch surfaces are not unlike the so-called Multi-Touch Collaboration Wall used by news networks now.

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New Leap In Artificial Intelligence May Finally Allow Robots To 'Learn'

New Leap In Artificial Intelligence May Finally Allow Robots To 'Learn' | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Developers working on 'teaching' an iCub robot how to learn new languages may have unlocked a new door to huge advances in artificial intelligence.


Via LeapMind
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As technological boundaries are broken, outrageous possibilities will be gradually realised.

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Engineers solve a biological mystery and boost artificial intelligence

Engineers solve a biological mystery and boost artificial intelligence | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
By simulating 25,000 generations of evolution within computers, Cornell University engineering and robotics researchers have discovered why biological networks tend to be organized as modules -- a finding that will lead to a deeper understanding of the evolution of complexity.

 

The new insight also will help evolve artificial intelligence, so robot brains can acquire the grace and cunning of animals.

 

From brains to gene regulatory networks, many biological entities are organized into modules -- dense clusters of interconnected parts within a complex network. For decades biologists have wanted to know why humans, bacteria and other organisms evolved in a modular fashion. Like engineers, nature builds things modularly by building and combining distinct parts, but that does not explain how such modularity evolved in the first place. Renowned biologists Richard Dawkins, Günter P. Wagner, and the late Stephen Jay

Gould identified the question of modularity as central to the debate over "the evolution of complexity."

 

For years, the prevailing assumption was simply that modules evolved because entities that were modular could respond to change more quickly, and therefore had an adaptive advantage over their non-modular competitors. But that may not be enough to explain the origin of the phenomena.

 

The team discovered that evolution produces modules not because they produce more adaptable designs, but because modular designs have fewer and shorter network connections, which are costly to build and maintain. As it turned out, it was enough to include a "cost of wiring" to make evolution favor modular architectures.


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Jose Santos's curator insight, May 26, 2013 8:54 AM

another role for modularity in network design

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The Future of Artificial Intelligence

The Future of Artificial Intelligence | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it

Robots are here to stay. They will be smarter, more versatile, more autonomous, and more like us in many ways. We humans will need to adapt to keep up.


Via LeapMind
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Matthew's curator insight, March 20, 2013 5:25 PM

This artivle has insights on the social, economic and religious problems that robots may cause in their intergration into a more AI affected worl.

 

Mengshuang's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:29 PM

Artificial Intelligence will be smarter.

Mr. Crawford's curator insight, November 3, 2013 4:03 PM

I think this a great read because it discusses the basics of how robots work and what they are capable of. It also talks about how AI will be able to understand facial expressions, gestures and body langauges, and how to react accordingly. Then it goes on to explain how religious groups might react to the treament of robots. Lastly, it suggests that "post-Asimov" laws will emerge.

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How Augmented Reality Will Revolutionise Construction in Australia - DesignBuild Source

How Augmented Reality Will Revolutionise Construction in Australia - DesignBuild Source | The Future of Information Technology | Scoop.it
DesignBuild Source How Augmented Reality Will Revolutionise Construction in Australia DesignBuild Source Last month, Rena Abboud was awarded a $10,000 scholarship by the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) to investigate and...

Via Pekka Puhakka
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AR is becoming more widespread, across many, many industries.

 

 

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