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Developing Creativity
Information and inspiration: psychology & creativity. http://talentdevelop.com
Curated by Douglas Eby
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Directing our feelings and thinking to be more creative

Directing our feelings and thinking to be more creative | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Do you remember how much you felt and thought as a child? Probably a lot, especially if you were gifted and creative. As an adult, we may have learned to cover up or set aside much of our inner life, in order to get along with others and do our jobs.

 

But if we want to be more fully alive and creative, it can really help to understand and stay in charge of our thinking and feelings.

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Marci Segal, MS's curator insight, April 16, 2013 7:57 AM

What if, eh?  Wouldn't it be nice to take people's emotions into account when leading them through creative process?  Wouldn't it be great if people could deliberately springboard from their emotions to inform their creative process and manage their expectations/experience?

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Brain Exercise

Brain Exercise | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

UCLA scientists have found that for computer-savvy middle-aged and older adults, searching the Internet triggers key centers in the brain that control decision-making and complex reasoning. The findings demonstrate that Web search activity may help stimulate and possibly improve brain function. The study, the first of its kind to assess the impact of Internet searching on brain performance, is currently in press at the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and will appear in an upcoming issue.

Additional details on the study and further research on the impact of computer technologies on the aging brain are highlighted in Small's book, "iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind". http://vsb.li/73nopw

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Madness Ain’t All It’s Cracked Up to Be: A Corrective

Madness Ain’t All It’s Cracked Up to Be: A Corrective | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

By David Dobbs - My post two days ago on the links between depression and creativity sparked some smart comments. Perhaps the best was sent to me privately by the excellent blogger The NeuroCritic, and I am highlighting it in its own post here, with The Neurocritic’s permission, because it makes a an important point that I failed to note in the original piece: These links between madness and creativity don’t make the more severe manifestations of depression or bipolar disorder any less destructive or painful.

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One of many related TalentDevelop posts: Rethinking Creativity and Depression

http://depressionandcreativity.org/139/rethinking-creativity-and-depression/

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Unconscious Creativity, Conscious Creating

Unconscious Creativity, Conscious Creating | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
There is growing support for the creative value of mentally stepping away from our work for a while, and not being so captivated by only consciousness.

 

Neuropsychologist Eric Kandel writes, “When we take the wrong approach to a problem, which happens often, we get nowhere by continuing to think about it. But if we refrain from thinking about the problem and distract ourselves… [we] transition from a rigid, convergent perspective to an associative, divergent perspective.”

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Intelligence, Creativity and Mania | Psychology Today

Intelligence, Creativity and Mania | Psychology Today | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Why do smart and manic so often go together? By Eric Maisel, Ph.D....

"Mania can hit anyone, since it can be induced by street drugs and by other causes as well as by the dynamics of one’s own racing, needy brain. But I want to focus on the way that it afflicts intelligent and creative people."

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Image from post: Creativity Higher with Bipolar? By Douglas Eby.

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2010/12/creativity-higher-with-bipolar/

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> Related book: Rethinking Depression: How to Shed Mental Health Labels and Create Personal Meaning, by Eric Maisel, PhD.
http://goo.gl/J77pc

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The 7 Biggest Creativity Killers

The 7 Biggest Creativity Killers | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
A crime scene investigation is underway to investigate a death. This is not an average death, this is the death of creative thinking. You see while IQ levels have been rising owing to enriched environments (the Flynn effect), creativity scores have actually been falling over time.

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By authors of the book Who Killed Creativity? And How To Get It Back http://vsb.li/NmGsb9

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Related article: Killing or Enhancing Creativity and Innovation in Business

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2012/05/killing-or-enhancing-creativity-and-innovation-in-business/

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Why Weird Experiences Boost Creativity

Why Weird Experiences Boost Creativity | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Article by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

Creative people think differently. But why? There is no magic bullet or single pill. We all have the potential for creativity, but there are so many different triggers that can broaden our minds, inspire, and motivate. Of course, there are just as many triggers that can shut down our minds. Since creativity is so important for individual well-being and societal innovation, it’s important that we systematically pull the right triggers.

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More perspectives of Kaufman in my post: Scott Barry Kaufman on Kick-starting Your Creativity

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2012/03/scott-barry-kaufman-on-kick-starting-your-creativity/

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Creativity and Intelligence: a Tripartite Structure? | Psychology Today

Creativity and Intelligence: a Tripartite Structure? | Psychology Today | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Creativity and Intelligence as opponent processes. By Sandeep Gautam...

Creativity and Intelligence are related, but also opposed to each other in a certain way. Traditional analysis of relations between intelligence and creativity have focussed on whether one is a subset of the other; whether they are correlated and found significantly more often together than by themselves; and whether one (high IQ) is a necessary condition or prerequisite for the other (creativity) - the threshold theory of creativity.

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Related: More Intelligence, More Creative?

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2012/01/more-intelligence-more-creative/

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Multiple Talents, Multiple Passions, Burnout

Multiple Talents, Multiple Passions, Burnout | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Many multitalented people feel inspired to pursue multiple projects, often at the same time. One potential downside is physical and emotional burnout.

Jennifer Westfeldt wrote, produced and acted in her movie “Friends With Kids”...she also directed the “two-year, round-the-clock endeavor” - “I must have been crazy to have donned so many hats,” Westfeldt said. “It made good sense for me to direct it, since I was involved in every aspect anyway. But I’m not sure I’d ever do it again.”

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Must One Risk Madness to Achieve Genius? | Psychology Today

Must One Risk Madness to Achieve Genius? | Psychology Today | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Recent research solves longstanding madness/genius paradox By Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D....

 

"There is only one difference between a madman and me. I am not mad." — Salvador Dali

Must one risk getting lost in the sea of madness in order to reach the lone island of genius? While not necessarily mad, creative minds are often chaotic, untethered and unhinged. These thought processes enable a creative person to bring together lots of seemingly disparate streams of information in a unique way not immediately obvious to those grounded in "reality." Which creates an interesting paradox: How can creative geniuses simultaneously be mad and brilliant?

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Related: Do We Need to be Crazy to be Creative? By Douglas Eby

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2010/06/do-we-need-to-be-crazy-to-be-creative/

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» Creative Passion: Teeming Neurons or Muse? - The Creative Mind

» Creative Passion: Teeming Neurons or Muse? - The Creative Mind | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Does creative inspiration come from our own teeming neurons, or is it a gift of a Muse?

 

A passion to create may feel like something from beyond us, or from a spirit being, but maybe that is what anything from the not quite known inner depths of our psyche feels like.

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» Doubting and Creating - The Creative Mind

» Doubting and Creating - The Creative Mind | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Even people with exceptional talents can feel insecure, and many creative people struggle with doubt versus confidence in themselves or their abilities.

 

“I really have that worry that I’ll wake up in the morning and think, ‘Oh God. I’m such a fraud, and they’ll find me out.’ I doubt myself a lot.” Those are comments by one of my favorite actors, Emily Blunt, who interestingly continued, “And maybe that’s a good thing..."

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» The Complexity of the Creative Personality - The Creative Mind

» The Complexity of the Creative Personality - The Creative Mind | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Creativity researcher Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi says, “If there is one word that makes creative people different from others, it is the word complexity.

 

“Like the color white that includes all colors, they tend to bring together the entire range of human possibilities within themselves. Creativity allows for paradox, light, shadow, inconsistency, even chaos – and creative people experience both extremes with equal intensity.”

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In praise of misfits

In praise of misfits | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Why business needs people with Asperger’s syndrome, attention-deficit disorder and dyslexia. - IN 1956 William Whyte argued in his bestseller, “The Organisation Man”, that companies were so in love with “well-rounded” executives that they fought a “fight against genius”.

Today many suffer from the opposite prejudice. Software firms gobble up anti-social geeks. Hollywood bends over backwards to accommodate the whims of creatives. Unlike the school playground, the marketplace is kind to misfits. Recruiters have noticed that the mental qualities that make a good computer programmer resemble those that might get you diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome

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Related: Brain Differences and Creativity

http://talentdevelop.com/4731/brain-differences-and-creativity/

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Unconscious Creativity, Conscious Creating

Unconscious Creativity, Conscious Creating | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
There is growing support for the creative value of mentally stepping away from our work for a while, and not being so captivated by only consciousness.

 

Neuropsychologist Eric Kandel writes, “When we take the wrong approach to a problem, which happens often, we get nowhere by continuing to think about it. But if we refrain from thinking about the problem and distract ourselves… [we] transition from a rigid, convergent perspective to an associative, divergent perspective.”

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Visual Spatial Learners and Creativity - The Creative Mind

Visual Spatial Learners and Creativity - The Creative Mind | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Visual spatial learners are more likely to be a late bloomer, as well as creatively, mechanically, emotionally, or technologically gifted.

Lesley Sword (of Gifted and Creative Services Australia) explains, “Temporal, sequential and analytic functions are thought to be associated with the left hemisphere of the brain. In contrast, spatial thinking involves synthesis, an intuitive grasp of complex systems, (often missing the steps) simultaneous processing of concepts, inductive reasoning (from the whole to the parts), use of imagination and generation of ideas by combining existing facts in new ways (creative thinking)."

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Eric Maisel on anxiety and developing creativity

Eric Maisel on anxiety and developing creativity | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

"Only a small percentage of creative people work as often or deeply as they might be expected to. What stops them? Anxiety or some face of anxiety."

 

Therapist and creativity coach Eric Maisel, PhD. also notes, “There are many different kinds of anxiety reactions. Sometimes anxiety manifests itself as confusion and a weakness of mind and body. Sometimes it manifests as persistent worry.”

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Your Best Life in the Arts with Dr. Eric Maisel

Your Best Life in the Arts with Dr. Eric Maisel | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Your Best Life in the Arts with Dr. Eric Maisel - In this 14-week class you will work directly with America’s foremost creativity coach.

 

Who Should Attend?

Fiction writers, memoirists, poets and nonfictions writers (including professionals contemplating writing a book); visual artists; performers; composers; stage and screen professionals; craftspeople; individuals wanting to create more deeply and more regularly; blocked creatives; people who’ve abandoned the arts and want to return; coaches, therapists, and other professionals who want to learn about the challenges of the creative life; and anyone interested in the creative life.

 

Learn more at the program site

http://talentdevelop.com/YBLITA

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Susan Cain: The power of introverts

Susan Cain: The power of introverts | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

In a culture where being social and outgoing are prized above all else, it can be difficult, even shameful, to be an introvert. But, as Susan Cain argues in this passionate talk, introverts bring extraordinary talents and abilities to the world, and should be encouraged and celebrated.

 

Related:
Susan Cain notes Bill Gates is an introvert, but not shy, and Barbra Streisand, who famously suffers from stage fright, is a shy extrovert. Cain notes, “Shyness and introversion are not the same thing. Shyness is the fear of negative judgment, and introversion is a preference for quiet, minimally stimulating environments. - From my post Creative Introverts
http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2011/07/creative-introverts/

In her NYTimes article, Cain writes, "Solitude is out of fashion. Our companies, our schools and our culture are in thrall to an idea I call the New Groupthink, which holds that creativity and achievement come from an oddly gregarious place…But there’s a problem with this view. Research strongly suggests that people are more creative when they enjoy privacy and freedom from interruption." -From my post Developing Creativity in Solitude
http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2012/01/developing-creativity-in-solitude/

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» Using The Skills of Disruptive Innovators - The Creative Mind

» Using The Skills of Disruptive Innovators - The Creative Mind | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
The Innovator's DNA book includes skills you can make use of being a disruptive innovator as an individual creator, as well as a business leader.

 

One of the skills: "Associating refers to your ability to make connections across seemingly unrelated questions, problems, fields of study, or ideas. Associational thinkers draw on knowledge acquired through questioning, observing, experimenting and networking to link together unexpected combinations of problems, ideas and observations to produce new business ideas."

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Anxiety and the Amygdala

Anxiety and the Amygdala | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Anxiety and the Amygdala

The amygdala in the brain's limbic system has a role is in the processing of emotional reactions like anxiety or 'flight or fight' responses.

 

Dealing with anxiety will help you express your creative talents more fully.

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Brain-calming Vs. Brainstorming

Brain-calming Vs. Brainstorming | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it
Brain-calming Vs. Brainstorming
By Think Jar Collective member Colin Funk

 

In the early nineties a wide variety of arts-based approaches to creative problem solving and idea generation surfaced. One of the most popular forms that emerged was that of Improv Theatre. ... As leaders from all sectors today find themselves in uncharted waters, the demand for not only quantity, but quality of ideas is paramount. Just as potent as the many powerful techniques from the world of Improv Theatre, comes a more appropriate practice and inquiry tool for these times – Brain-calming.

... Brain-calming techniques are on the rise and can be seen routinely in many private and public organizations as meditation, learning partner walks, slow food dinners, conversation cafes, and journaling.

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Dealing with Your "Inner Critic" | Psychology Today

Dealing with Your "Inner Critic" | Psychology Today | Developing Creativity | Scoop.it

Dealing with Your "Inner Critic"

Self-criticism is a two-edged sword.

By Dennis Palumbo...

'Among the majority of my creative patients — TV and film writers, directors, actors, etc., a primary concern is the struggle against their “inner critic.” By that I mean the persistent, sometimes harsh and almost always shaming “voice” that belittles or invalidates their work.'

...

One of my related posts: Toxic Criticism and Developing Creativity By Douglas Eby

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/creative-mind/2011/01/toxic-criticism-and-developing-creativity/

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