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How To Build Positive Marketing Stories That Work

How To Build Positive Marketing Stories That Work | Storied Development | Scoop.it
Editor’s NoteThis is the third and final excerpt that we’re running from Winning the Story Wars: Why Those Who Tell--and Live--the Best Stories Will Rule the Future by Jonah Sachs, the cofounder of Free Range Studios (the creative studio behind The...

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Soundcloud explores the four effects sound has on...

Soundcloud explores the four effects sound has on... | Storied Development | Scoop.it
Soundcloud explores the four effects sound has on us – physiological, psychological, cognitive, and behavioral – in a concrete complement to their wonderful abstract short film, Sound.

 

So cool! Think of audio branding to get the maximum out of this video.

 

In our business storytelling it is too easy to get caught up in the visuals. But what about sound?

 

This is a great primer on how sound affects us and will get you thinking about the necessity for adding sound to your visual storytelling for high-impact and memorable pieces.

 

Enjoy!

 

Original link:

http://exp.lore.com/post/21208635527/soundcloud-explores-the-four-effects-sound-has-on ;

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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8 great examples of nonprofit storytelling - How to convey a powerful message with videos & photos

8 great examples of nonprofit storytelling - How to convey a powerful message with videos & photos | Storied Development | Scoop.it

As regular readers know, I’ve been a longtime proponent of visual storytelling to advance the missions of nonprofits, cause organizations and businesses. (Heck, I co-founded Ourmedia.org before there was a YouTube.)

People take action on behalf of a cause only when they feel an emotional connection, and yet nonprofits in particular are famously bad at telling their own stories.

What we tell people in our Socialbrite bootcamps and in our consulting work is this: Every nonprofit is now a media organization (the same goes for social enterprises and businesses). Never before have the tools of visual storytelling been so inexpensive, easy to use and accessible to the masses.

So why aren’t you taking advantage of visual storytelling yet? (Or are you? Tell us in the comments!)


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Storytelling 2.0: Why nonprofits need to tell stories

Storytelling 2.0: Why nonprofits need to tell stories | Storied Development | Scoop.it

Nonprofits have astonishing stories to tell — about the constituents you serve, about your mission, about your organization. But too often nonprofits don’t know how to convey those stories effectively.


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Stories Can Transform an Idea & Change the World!

 Absolutely brilliant, powerful and inspiring!

 

TED talk, TEDx East, Nancy Duarte, Presentation, Resonate, Slide:ology, slideology, duarte design...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfQF3DXG-S4


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Can Stories Be Data?

Your numerical data can tell stories, but can stories be data that leads to continuous improvement?   Do numbers only matter?

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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Storytelling project improves monitoring and evaluation

Storytelling project improves monitoring and evaluation | Storied Development | Scoop.it

The question is simple: “Please tell a story about a time when a person or organization tried to help someone or change something in your community.” That question has elicited over 21,000 stories from people in Kenya and Uganda. The stories are part of the GlobalGiving Storytelling Project.

 

The story approach allows community members to participate in evaluating projects. Using SenseMaker™ software, GlobalGiving plans to turn the qualitative data embedded in the stories into quantitative reports.


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Six Common “Character” Flaws in Nonprofit Storytelling (Part I)

Six Common “Character” Flaws in Nonprofit Storytelling (Part I) | Storied Development | Scoop.it

Characters are absolutely critical to a good story. There’s a reason why we cheer for Rudy when he finally gets to play, why we cry for Bambi, and why we love it when Harry Potter defeats the despicable Lord Voldemort.

 

If someone is to change the way they see your issue and/or be motivated to act, they must be inspired by a person they can relate to and root for. Based on our experiences, here are three of the six common pitfalls regarding characters in nonprofit storytelling, along with examples of how some groups are doing it right. A second blog post will cover the other three.


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How to use microsites to better tell your nonprofit’s story

How to use microsites to better tell your nonprofit’s story | Storied Development | Scoop.it

So as fundraisers, how can we tell the real story – expose the true heart of an organization – when our messaging is only one part of a huge multi-dimensional website?

 

The answer is simple: Create a microsite that allows you to focus on a particular topic, present specific calls to action and, with the help of social media, reach large numbers of people much more quickly than a traditional website.


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Make Your Annual Report Sing: 5 Ways to Choose and Use Stories

Make Your Annual Report Sing: 5 Ways to Choose and Use Stories | Storied Development | Scoop.it

Here are some ideas to get you started choosing and using stories in your annual reports to deepen the connection with your audiences.


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Digital Storytelling for Non-Profits: 8 Tips (Tech Soup) - ALEX NOBLE - Your Happiness Journal 2012

Digital Storytelling for Non-Profits: 8 Tips (Tech Soup) - ALEX NOBLE - Your Happiness Journal 2012 | Storied Development | Scoop.it

Advice on planning, building, and promoting digital stories By: Brian Satterfield (Note that these principles apply to all storytelling, not exclusively to non-profits.)


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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The Power of Storytelling for Nonprofits

The Power of Storytelling for Nonprofits | Storied Development | Scoop.it

 

Nonprofit communications too often get tangled up in the language of data, generalities, and high-level objectives, which keeps supporters at arms-length from the emotional core or their organization. To be effective, they need to tell a compelling story, giving supporters a one-to-one connection to the impact a donation can have. Find out how one organization communicates with stories that carry the emotional resonance to touch and connect with supporter, and read about four resources for undertanding and utilizing the power of storytelling.

 

The link to this story is here: http://lindaziskind.com/the-power-of-storytelling


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Karen Dietz's comment, January 27, 2012 5:51 PM
Hey Jan -- the link seems to be broken.
Linda Ziskind's comment, January 27, 2012 6:51 PM
Here's the URL to the story that this should link to:

http://lindaziskind.com/the-power-of-storytelling
Karen Dietz's comment, January 27, 2012 7:24 PM
Thank you Linda! I did find the article, really liked it, and added it to my curated content also. I appreciate the follow-up. Have a great weekend.
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ARGs on Your Bookshelf: New Book Explores Transmedia Entertainment

ARGs on Your Bookshelf: New Book Explores Transmedia Entertainment | Storied Development | Scoop.it
Andrea Phillips recently published A Creator's Guide to Transmedia Storytelling. The book provides a taste of the creative and practical con...

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Logic+Emotion: How To Think And Communicate Visually

Logic+Emotion: How To Think And Communicate Visually | Storied Development | Scoop.it
Originally posted on Edelman Digital Visual storytelling is nothing new. We only need to look to the earliest signs of humanity for proof—simple paintings on the walls of caves tell the story that people are a visual tribe.

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Rosanne M Lammey's comment, June 8, 2012 7:53 PM
Visualization is something I think will help students with comprehension, this article more about communication but there are some good points about visualizing thinking.
Liz Becker's comment, June 13, 2012 6:36 PM
I like this. I think #4 might be a good way to describe and help students with this when it comes to multiple texts. Also, I worked at a tutoring center where one of the tutors was really good at getting struggling readers to visualize what they were reading. He had them develop and explain the "movie" in their mind in order to aid in comprehension. It is a pretty cool strategy.
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News and Entertainment in the Digital Age: A Vast Wasteland Revisited

In 1961, Newt Minow — then Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission — delivered a landmark speech to the National Association of Broadcasters on "Television and the Public Interest," in which he described television programming as a "vast...
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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Storytelling advice from Mercy Corps

Storytelling advice from Mercy Corps | Storied Development | Scoop.it

One non profit that definitely gets storytelling right is Mercy Corps. Stories are up front and center in all their communications, from their blog to their Facebook page and even on their donation page. We recently sat down with Joy Portella, Mercy Corps’ Director of Communications, to get the inside scoop on how they’ve gotten so good at storytelling.


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Forget the platform: The "elements of good storytelling are eternal," Pulitzer winner says

Forget the platform: The "elements of good storytelling are eternal," Pulitzer winner says | Storied Development | Scoop.it

As a reporter and editor in the field for more than 30 years, Jacqui Banaszynski has seen storytelling evolve with the ever-expanding platforms and tools that have entered the journalistic landscape.

Banaszynski won a feature writing Pulitzer in 1988 for her series "AIDS in the Heartland". She is currently a Knight Chair professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and editing fellow at the Poynter Institute.

In an email Q&A with IJNet, she discusses the fundamental aspects of effective storytelling - constants even in the frantic digital age - and the delicate balance of thorough but sensitive reporting.


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The Pull of Narrative – In Search of Persistent Context

The Pull of Narrative – In Search of Persistent Context | Storied Development | Scoop.it

Got a few minutes? Do you like something thought provoking?

 

In this excellent article, John Hagel for Edge Perspectives, starts off by saying that we all need context in a world where there are so many available options it can be disorienting. Ultimately however, he talks about the importance of narrative: defining it, giving examples of it and expressing its importance to us now, in a world where so many no longer resonate to the narratives that took us from what they replaced to the here and now.

 

He differentiates between personal, institutional and societal narrative, suggesting that the 2nd of these has particularly lost its way in recent years. My takeaways, which couple with my prior thoughts on the subject, are that personal narrative is going through a rebirth, as is that of smaller institutions. There is evidence of where larger institutions fails when they give up on narrative, and succeed when they create or embrace a new one. Unfortunately the area that we are furthest behind in is the most difficult area of all. Whether we agree or disagree with the societal narratives that got us this far, creating new unifying forces for us in this area is the real challenge. The context is in how we relate to the broader narrative.

 

There is a reason that stories which can unite people in their tens or hundreds of millions come around so rarely In an age of so much information, the task of creating the new narratives through which we can move forward in unison, is the most difficult it has ever been. And herein lies the challenge with which the article ends.

 

To quote:

 

"The role of a narrative is ultimately to attract, engage, motivate and call people to more fully achieve their potential. Narratives represent a powerful pull mechanism that can shape the world around us.


Who will craft these broader social narratives? Who even understands the need and power of a new set of social narratives? What would such narratives look like?"

 

Intro:

 

"We live in a world of ever more change and choice, a world where we have far more opportunity than ever to achieve our potential. That kind of world is enormously exciting, and full of options. But it is also"...

 

http://edgeperspectives.typepad.com/edge_perspectives/2011/05/the-pull-of-narrative-in-search-of-persistent-context.html


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Blake’s YouTube curation of nonprofit storytelling — Nonprofit Storytelling

Blake’s YouTube curation of nonprofit storytelling — Nonprofit Storytelling | Storied Development | Scoop.it
My YouTube curation entitled Storytelling for Nonprofits collects videos featuring resources specifically targeting nonprofit storytelling.

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Six Common “Character” Flaws in Nonprofit Storytelling (Part II)

Six Common “Character” Flaws in Nonprofit Storytelling (Part II) | Storied Development | Scoop.it

In my first post about the need for more characters in nonprofits stories, I recommended that people, not organizations, be the protagonists, that they struggle some in their journey, and that we hear them speak (through dialogue/quotes).

 

This post covers three other important ways to improve your characters and your stories. Please let me know if you have had success with others!


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Rescooped by Nick Greenfield from Storytelling for Nonprofits
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Startup Venture Applies Storytelling Techniques to “About Us” Section

Startup Venture Applies Storytelling Techniques to “About Us” Section | Storied Development | Scoop.it
The Art Of Storytelling In Business Communications And Public Relations...

 

Perfect article.  Great read.  Fabulous examples. Easy to implement.  Follow the "Our Story" structure for your "About" page!

 

For nonprofits, imagine how much better your "About Us" pages and grant proposals would read if you followed this example.


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Neuroscience Proves Why Your Nonprofit Stories Move Supporters To Action @johnhaydon

Neuroscience Proves Why Your Nonprofit Stories Move Supporters To Action @johnhaydon | Storied Development | Scoop.it

"In your brain, you have neurons called “mirror” neurons. These brain cells are essentially the “soft-wiring” behind empathy. It’s why you feel sadness when a friend is struggling, and happy when they overcome an obstacle. You experience their ups and downs as if they are yours.

 

This video explains more about the science behind empathy. You’ll learn why stories work better than stats in your online (and offline) appeals. You’ll learn why pictures elicite a strong emotional response than text."

 

Don't let the title fool you -- even though this is slanted to non-profits, we all need to know this information.

 

By watching this video (which takes very complex notions and breaks them down into simple-to-understand chunks), you will learn a alot about empathy. I quibble with a few points, but overall it's a good synopsis.

 

What is the connection to story?  Well, by sharing a story you connect with your audience through empathy.  So the more you understand about how and why empathy works, the more you will master business storytelling. 

 

Enjoy the video and let me know what you think!


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Funders should help grant recipients tell their stories

Funders should help grant recipients tell their stories | Storied Development | Scoop.it
The question is – when organisations write up their funding bids, should they put training as a small part of their budget? Or should it be offered as part of the support package a funder offers?

 

I think that funders should make it a requirement of accepting a grant that recipients are compelled to keep a blog, capture photographs or produce some kind of content which they should be able to use online. In turn, the charity or community group can use this content for their own marketing, communcations and profile raising.

 

I know for many charities, particularly smaller ones, this kind of content gathering will be seem as a big ask, especially with feedback forms and other paperwork to fill in, but I have a sneaky feeling that this will be a key part of impact reporting in the year ahead.


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Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox

Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox | Storied Development | Scoop.it

You’d think that a problem makes for an interesting story. But when it comes to telling the story of game-changing innovation, the “problem/solution” model is broken. This is why so many brands and causes have a hard time telling their story. When it comes to business, you want to introduce a paradox, not just a problem.

 

What a great post from colleage Michael Margolis on how to re-think the problem/resolution elements of a story into presenting the possbility & then the obstacle being faced.

 

This is an especially important insight for nonprofits to get because the problem/resolution set up starts out with a negative -- which can be a turn-off for people. As Michale says, we are surrounded by enough problems these days.

 

So turn the problem/resolution dyamic on its head and shift to presenting the possibility/obstacle dynamic instead.  That way you are leading with a positive, and then presenting the obstacle to overcome. Obviously then people's participation in the cause/business will help the obstacle be overcome. Or part of the obstacle has already been overcome with people's help.

 

Now, I would suggest doing the same for any business -- present the possibility and the obstacle, and then the resolution or call to action.

 

I be you'll feel better setting up your story this way, and so will your audience. Let me know how it goes!


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5 Places To Look For Your Brand's Story

5 Places To Look For Your Brand's Story | Storied Development | Scoop.it
Finding your authentic brand’s story isn’t a luxury for the touchy-feely. Given our overloaded channels of communication and the general lack of trust with advertising messages, finding your brand's true emotional core and expressing it through your brand’s story is essential.

 

First, know what you're looking for.

 

Ask any storywriter "what are you trying to say through your story?" Chances are you’ll get some expression of their worldview or values. Ask a marketer and you might get something resembling an elevator speech. Brand stories are very different and far more powerful than that.


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