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Make Agility Part of Your Process - Harvard Business Review

Make Agility Part of Your Process - Harvard Business Review | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it

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Fred Zimny's insight:

Not only on the executive levvel, but also in operations. Imperative for service designers and service managers

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Designing design thinking driven operations
I blog about strategic and tactical service design and management.

Trying to explore how service design practices develop.

With a focus in developing strong conceptual work, supporting design decisions on research and enabling readers to create conversations with clients, colleagues and customers.

I also aim to support senior managers and professionals to reflect and improve their practices.
Curated by Fred Zimny
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Designing design thinking driven operations

Designing design thinking driven operations | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it

 

 

Customer experience, customer service, design thinking, service design, service management

 

Mail me: fjg.zimny@serve4impact.com

  

Follow me on twitter: @FredZimny

 

Connect with me on linkedin http://www.linkedin.com/in/fredzimny

  

Even more good stuff at http://serve4impact.com 

 

 

 

 



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Tomorrow's Leaders Need Diverse Challenges Today

Tomorrow's Leaders Need Diverse Challenges Today | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Cynthia D. McCauley, coeditor of Experience-Driven Leader Development , introduces a career development lesson from It's Not the How or the What but the Who by Claudio Fernández-Aráoz.
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Exploring The Elusive ROI of Customer Experience Management

Exploring The Elusive ROI of Customer Experience Management | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Sustainable CXM ROI requires a well-oiled machine in the people and process categories of CXM investment.
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Empathy In Creativity and Design Thinking

Empathy In Creativity and Design Thinking | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
A look at how empathy is needed in all domains these days, especially for business innovation and design thinking.
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Michael Allenberg's curator insight, July 28, 8:29 AM

Empathy leads to a deeper understanding of the #HumanTechsperience

Martina Patone's curator insight, Today, 7:59 AM

empathy in creativity and design

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How Old Industries Become Young Again

How Old Industries Become Young Again | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Many mature industries are about to be young again.
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2014 Internet Trends Shaping Tomorrow’s Customer Experiences [SLIDESHARE]

2014 Internet Trends Shaping Tomorrow’s Customer Experiences [SLIDESHARE] | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
The Slideshare below is a comprehensive compendium of trends provided by KPCB International and well worth a more detailed investigation but here are some key points that piqued interest on first viewing in the context of how digital shapes customer experience
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Is there patient and carer input into service design? | KPMG | GLOBAL

Is there patient and carer input into service design? | KPMG | GLOBAL | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Healthcare will need to ensure that patients and carers design services to deliver better value.
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Beach Reading… Boardroom Style

Beach Reading… Boardroom Style | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
The key to tech customer loyalty isn't about being the biggest--it's about embracing the smallest.
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Data Is the New Oil of the Digital Economy

Data Is the New Oil of the Digital Economy | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Data in the 21st Century is like Oil in the 18th Century: an immensely, untapped valuable asset. Like oil, for those who see Data’s fundamental value and learn to extract and use it there will be huge rewards.
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Don Tapscott Vlog: Demand Pull For Change

Don Tapscott Vlog:  Demand Pull For Change | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
There is a fundamental change in how we govern ourselves and solve problems.
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5 New Design Careers for the 21st Century

5 New Design Careers for the 21st Century | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Fancy a career in design? When I made that choice 30 years ago, the options were limited.
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The Evolution of CXM in Retail |

The Evolution of CXM in Retail | | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
We take a look at how Customer Experience Management in the retail sector has evolved due to changes in the technology used by consumers.
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Design Thinking at eBay

Design Thinking at eBay | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
eBay designers work on innovative and exciting projects to improve the user experience for their customers. Come see what we've been working on and meet some of the talented designers who work on them!
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Designing Entrepreneurship. PhD Defense Presentation

Design can be an aid in discovering business opportunities, not only in shaping them as products or services. Particularly, service design instruments can help…
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Your 2014 Digital Marketing Roadmap - Marketing Technology Blog

Your 2014 Digital Marketing Roadmap - Marketing Technology Blog | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it

Sometimes it’s easier to just follow the dotted line as you’re looking to ensure your digital marketing is balanced and complete. This infographic compliments of Two Legit aims to do just that, walking you through your web presence, mobile, ecommerce, outbound, inbound, content and social media marketing initiatives.+

One element lost in this infographic is the ability for all of the strategies to work with one another. For instance, utilizing your content marketing to power newsletters that are optimized for mobile devices. That’s not defined in this infographic but it’s an absolute necessity if you’d like to fully leverage email and ensure your emails are read properly. I’ve written before that the modern digital media consultant is more of a conductor, balancing the volumes of each strategy to make some sweet, sweet music!+

More often than not, we find that the key to marketing well isn’t doing everything… it’s balancing a combination of strategies, amplifying the impact by having them work together, and understanding how much of each strategy to initiate in order to maximize results. That said – this is still a great checklist to go down and ensure you’re not missing anything! This infographic also provides some statistics behind the digital marketing trends.

 


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 28, 3:29 PM

A comprehensive checklist of things that #brandmanagers should keep in mind as they develop a #brand digital marketing plan. Synergy is important.

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Welcome to the battle for disruptive models and technology in hotels

Welcome to the battle for disruptive models and technology in hotels | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Hotels are sitting at a crossroads of three dimensions that will unquestionably experience significant disruption in the coming years.
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Peter Thompson's curator insight, July 28, 7:17 AM

Great article with lots of examples & a slideshare as well

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5 Things I Wish I Knew – A Service Design Journey

Keynote presentation delivered October 3, 2013 at Adaptive Path's Service Experience Conference.
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Customer Service is the New Marketing: Turning Satisfaction Into Sales | Social Media Today

Customer Service is the New Marketing: Turning Satisfaction Into Sales | Social Media Today | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
How can a great #custserv experience drive sales? We explore on #smtlive next week. Hear from @IHG @Citibank @SAPCRM http://t.co/G0hqALItTT
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Why Internal Branding is Central to Customer Experience Management

Why Internal Branding is Central to Customer Experience Management | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Why Internal Branding is Central to Customer Experience Management (RT @clearaction: Why Internal Branding is Central to Customer Experience Management http://t.co/ghRsVQFQrL #CX #customer #experience)...
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With jobs for life dead, today’s workers forced to be flexible - The Globe and Mail

With jobs for life dead, today’s workers forced to be flexible - The Globe and Mail | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
With jobs for life dead, today’s workers forced to be flexible /via @globeandmail http://t.co/p3XOXIW0H3
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What’s the design process at GDS? | Government Digital Service

What’s the design process at GDS? | Government Digital Service | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
The Government Digital Service (GDS) is leading the digital transformation of the UK government. (What’s the design process at the Government Digital Service?
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Judith Jassogne's curator insight, July 24, 7:59 AM

It makes dream... But It's possible ! Then...

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Creating growth clusters: What role for local government?

Creating growth clusters: What role for local government? | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Fred Zimny's insight:

Source: http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/public_sector/Creating_growth_clusters_What_role_for_local_government

 

Many governments in industrialized countries aim to encourage entrepreneurship and start-up activity to spur job creation and economic growth. To what extent governments are capable of doing so is uncertain. Nonetheless, policy makers at the regional and municipal levels are closer to the sources of innovation than those at the national level. For example, innovation in the form of start-up activity tends to occur in large metropolitan areas, initially without the involvement of policy makers. Take Berlin, where a vibrant ecosystem developed in the past several years without systematic government intervention.

While an enabling policy context might not be a precondition for seeding entrepreneurial activity, it may become more critical when taking a cluster to scale. To flourish, entrepreneurial activity requires a concentration of talent, infrastructure, capital, and networks—key success factors of a start-up ecosystem, as epitomized by Silicon Valley. Not all economic-policy instruments aimed at nurturing start-ups are at the city level. Still, local policy makers should think systematically about what it takes to support a start-up ecosystem. When doing so, their focus could be on tackling the bottlenecks and constraints that might otherwise inhibit a vibrant start-up ecosystem rather than picking winners by supporting investment in particular sectors or business models.

More specifically, such local initiatives can help link entrepreneurs to schools and universities, ease administrative matters for foreign workers and founders wishing to settle in a location, support development of suitable infrastructure and connectivity, and communicate and market the attractiveness of a location vis-à-vis other start-up centers. New York, for example, founded a tech campus for applied sciences; Tel Aviv built working spaces for entrepreneurs; Berlin is in the process of setting up a privately managed fund to raise capital for start-ups.

Establishing a coherent and supportive entrepreneurial policy at the city level is challenging. Municipal decision makers should identify bottlenecks in the start-up ecosystem and design and carry out initiatives to address them. These moves require a project-oriented, dynamic, and capable organizational structure. This article outlines an implementation approach that local policy makers can use to strengthen a start-up ecosystem. It discusses, in particular, the concept of the start-up delivery unit—an approach employed recently by the mayor and municipal government of Berlin.

Spurring innovation in a dynamic, multistakeholder environment

Berlin, London, New York, and Tel Aviv are cities that stand out for their vibrant start-up ecosystems. London started its East London Tech City in 2010; New York and Tel Aviv have established New York Digital City and Start-up City Tel Aviv. In 2014, Berlin started implementing several initiatives.

These cities faced common challenges in defining and carrying out the initiatives, including having to deal with many stakeholders that create the potential for bottlenecks. A successful start-up policy must fulfill two requirements:

The ability to keep pace with the start-up environment. The start-up world is volatile; investors and founders, and their needs and activities, change rapidly. Policy makers cannot pick winners in such an environment. Instead, they should focus on enabling structures that can address more fundamental requirements.The ability to succeed in a multistakeholder environment. When starting initiatives to spur innovation, there are many competing interests: stakeholders from the private sector, such as venture capitalists, corporations, and start-ups; diverse levels of governments; and universities and research institutes. Bringing together and managing those stakeholders and interests are essential to successful implementation.

We have found that start-up delivery units—situated primarily in the mayor’s office—are an effective, pragmatic way of realizing these two requirements. Start-up delivery units are inspired by broader governmental delivery units, an approach employed worldwide to facilitate program implementation. Governments have used delivery units for more than 15 years to rigorously track performance, identify obstacles early, solve problems, and correct course. They vary in scope and size but generally are not too large. They can be centralized or within line agencies. McKinsey’s study of delivery units and work with governments on them show that the most successful share several important characteristics: an outstanding leader with a track record of delivering outcomes, direct access to top leadership, talented staff with excellent communication and problem-solving skills, and the ability to use soft power to influence ministries.

Employing a start-up delivery unit

A delivery unit drives and coordinates start-up activities and helps cities progress much more rapidly than they otherwise might. The unit should mirror as much as possible the ad hoc way start-ups do business and provide a credible focal point for immediate problem resolution, stakeholder engagement, and response. We have identified three important steps to launch a start-up delivery unit.

Hiring the right talent

Policy makers’ experience in London and New York suggests that finding the right kind of people to work in start-up delivery units is challenging. The participants must understand how to function not only in the volatile world of start-ups but also in the steadier, slower-paced environment of public administration. Successful start-up delivery units hire an established entrepreneur as their managing director and seek the best talent they can find from within public administration and established companies. Rotating employees in and out of the unit can help it remain fresh, open to new ideas, and improve dialogues.

One way to help overcome skepticism of start-ups toward policy makers is engaging an established entrepreneur to lead the delivery unit. In London, Eric van der Kleij, the founder of the successful start-up Adeptra, was appointed to lead the London Tech City Investment Organisation (TCIO); in New York, Rachel Sterne Haot, the former CEO of the global crowdsourced news start-up GroundReport, was appointed chief digital officer of the NYC Digital program.

The job description should be similar to other top government or private-sector roles. The ability to truly shape the city’s start-up ecosystem is critical. Direct reporting lines to the mayor ensure not only flatter hierarchies and clear chains of command but also imply a career launchpad for the managing director of the unit through enhanced visibility. Of course, competitive salaries and sufficient budget help attract talent as well. London’s TCIO, for example, has an annual budget of £2.1 million pounds, 61 percent of which is spent on the salaries of the delivery unit.

Even competent leadership will only succeed if complemented by a cutting-edge team consisting of 8 to 12 talented private- and public-sector employees. Getting start-up founders themselves to dedicate substantial time is difficult. Instead, the delivery unit could aim for entrepreneurial talent from other private-sector companies and government bodies. London’s TCIO hired staff from Siemens, as well as long-term public servants previously involved in trade and investment promotion.

Additionally, to ensure the delivery unit will not revert to the somewhat slower-paced world of public administration, permanent rotation of staff into and out of the unit is an option and has proved to boost morale in other public-sector contexts (for example, in Denmark, Germany, and Norway).

Conducting ‘delivery labs’

Once the delivery-unit team is in place, a “delivery lab” can be used to inject ideas and translate high-level strategies into detailed implementation plans. A lab is an intense problem-solving environment that collocates the 20 to 40 key people needed to crack a problem. Delivery labs can also help build team spirit and momentum. Labs may comprise workshops of several days with relevant stakeholders, including venture capitalists, corporations, start-ups, diverse levels of governments, universities, and research institutes. For instance, the lab would attempt to pinpoint the key areas of actions in a start-up ecosystem. Questions like the following may be answered: What can we do to increase capital availability in our city? How can we ensure there are enough coworking spaces at reasonable prices? Taking into account that the start-up environment changes rapidly, analyses and solutions should be updated regularly. Ideally, such labs are conducted annually.

To assess the status of a start-up ecosystem in a delivery lab, a systematic and data-driven analysis aiming to clearly define and redefine the challenges to be addressed is valuable. By providing a data-driven basis for decision making, this analysis not only aids in obtaining buy-in of stakeholders but also helps the delivery unit to regularly update problem definitions and identify the root causes of problems.

Based on the problem definitions and the identified root causes, delivery labs can also be used to assess whether existing solutions are still adequate. Some employ “premortem analysis,” a managerial tool used in the private sector to identify implementation obstacles (exhibit). In step one of such an analysis, all initiatives to be implemented are outlined. Then, delivery-lab participants are asked to imagine a worst-case scenario for each initiative and predict why it might fail. Next, responses to each potential failure are designed. To track the progress of initiatives, some start-up delivery units publish an annual report after a delivery lab.

Exhibit

Some delivery labs use ‘premortem analysis’ to pinpoint implementation obstacles.

EnlargeFocusing on quick wins and correcting actions frequently

The pressure to produce results is great, given the volatility of the start-up environment and stakeholder impatience. Thus, start-up delivery units risk overpromising and underachieving. To minimize this possibility, initiatives should be based on estimated impact on start-up activity (usually measured by how much activity can be enhanced along the funnel from start-up creation to growth and maturity) and the feasibility of implementation (a more qualitative internal assessment). Experience shows that this often will differentiate those initiatives that either have high impact but are difficult to carry out or are easy to do but have little effect.

Since speed and ability to react to changing conditions is crucial in a start-up environment, the most successful delivery units go for the low-hanging fruit first. In Berlin, the city carried out a start-up competition for university students to help foster entrepreneurial spirit among graduates. It also plans to create a digital directory aimed at enhancing start-ups’ networks; start-ups will be able to list a short description of their business idea and identify business contacts that could help them. In addition, the city is digitizing select administrative processes to lessen the bureaucratic burden on start-ups. These kinds of initiatives can offer early, fast victories for the delivery unit, showing stakeholders that it can produce results.

But policy makers must be realistic. Start-ups are a moving target, so cities likely won’t get their initiatives right the first time, no matter how cautiously they plan. As such, successful delivery units don’t waste time searching for the perfect design. Instead, policy makers should mimic the approach taken by most start-ups: launch the initiative, analyze the launch, learn what went wrong—and then adjust it and relaunch. This rapid prototyping allows policy makers to maximize the utility of an initiative by repeatedly and quickly adjusting to the needs of start-ups and sustaining momentum through prompt action, all while running at minimum cost.

An example is the New York City Open Data initiative, which aims to spur innovation and the founding of new digital tech start-ups by providing public data and hosting “hackathons.” At nyc.gov, data sets were added gradually and the website’s functionality was improved little by little, moving from a beta version to the one available today. This not only allowed a fast start for the site but also offered developers the opportunity to create apps using the open data already available there. Another case is the start-up campus Tempelhof in Berlin. Instead of waiting to launch the start-up campus at its anticipated capacity of 25,000 square meters—which would take more than three years—Berlin decided to go with an early version and move in start-ups from day one. Using the launch-relaunch approach, Berlin seeks feedback from the start-ups to improve infrastructure for more recently arrived renter-participants, all while generating revenue for the campus.

 

As the competition for investment and entrepreneurial talent reaches global proportions, municipal support for nascent entrepreneurial clusters becomes a must-have, especially for large metropolitan areas. City policy makers may find delivery units useful as they try to strengthen a start-up ecosystem. In introducing such an approach, policy makers should pursue the start-up model: rather than designing the perfect instrument and policy, they should see themselves as continuous problem solvers and work closely with the entrepreneurs and innovators around them.

About the authors

Julian Kirchherr and Gundbert Scherf are consultants in McKinsey’s Berlin office, where Katrin Suder is a director.

The authors would like to thank Holger Haenecke and Lea Thiel for their contributions to this report.

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Service Science Factory: Call for Participants in Service Design Projects

Service Science Factory: Call for Participants in Service Design Projects | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Would you like to apply your knowledge and fresh ideas in hands-on projects while strengthening your CV? In September the Service Science Factory is launching two exciting service design projects t...
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Mobile, Cloud and Data Lead Next Era of Business Transformation

Mobile, Cloud and Data Lead Next Era of Business Transformation | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
The mobile revolution has transformed the way we connect, relax, navigate, enjoy our music and document our lives in photography. Yet, for the most part, the impact of all this native capability on the devices we carry hasn’t penetrated the world ...
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Move from mass marketing to customer decision management

Move from mass marketing to customer decision management | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
You may notice that marketing is changing. (Move from mass marketing to customer decision management http://t.co/WfOMunSZHB #sasci)
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Retail industry struggling to improve customer experience, says report - Business Reporter

Retail industry struggling to improve customer experience, says report - Business Reporter | Designing design thinking driven operations | Scoop.it
Retail industry struggling to improve customer experience, says report Business Reporter Fusion Affinities' report showed that 92 per cent of retailers agree that providing a high customer service is vital to their businesses' success, but many are...
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