Designing service
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Designing  service
One of the misunderstandings of these days is that a designer has an artist or artisan background. In that approach designers are idea generators, visualizers and prototypers.   That is not our point of view. Our adagium comes from the management writer Herbert Simon, who stated that "Everyone designs who devises courses of action  aimed at changing existing into preferred ones".  As stated by others, this version of design tends to abstraction and general expertise.   The focus of this blog is service and services. In our world  service is exchanged for service. All firms are service firms; all markets are centered on the exchange of service, and all economies and societies are service based. And just even government and other institutions are always exchanging services for services. But be sure, in this era of change there is a heavy focus also on concept generation, visualization and digital concept and prototypes.   Interested in designing services? In case you are interested to follow,  check the options in the sidebar. You can follow this blog on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and via email and RSS. It is up to you! In case you are interested to connect on linkedin, please feel free to do so (some of this content is also posted on that platform).  
Curated by Fred Zimny
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Will Hubspot Change Moribund CRM Landscape? Yes

Will Hubspot Change Moribund CRM Landscape? Yes | Designing  service | Scoop.it

Posted by Serge Salager on TechCrunch Editor’s note: Serge Salager was formerly CEO of OneMove Technologies and a marketing manager at Affinnova and Procter & Gamble.   After several years of relatively stagnant waters, what was a dull CRM landscape dominated by one player is heating up dramatically. Salesforce officially put its $3.5 billion market …

Marty Note
WOW and WOW. Hubspot confirms what web marketers already know - distance between CRM, CMS and Content Marketing / Curation is short. As distinctions between tools blurs because it must we will gain.

Perhaps a new generation of tools will actually WORK without needing to string a ten tools together, bridge five analytics ecosystems and answer the questions we need to know in near real time.

Pigs flying yet? HubSpot's CRM entry could be ALL GOOD though :). M


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5 Secret & Highly Disruptive Internet Marketing Tactics For 2014 via ScentTrail Marketing

5 Secret & Highly Disruptive Internet Marketing Tactics For 2014 via ScentTrail Marketing | Designing  service | Scoop.it

5 Internet Marketing Secrets
Some of these 2014 "secrets" such as ecommerce and social media may not feel very secret, but there is still plenty of "blue ocean" in them still. Ecommerce creates great content marketing support for less and less effort (to create the story) so every website should have a store now even if all they sell is their logo merchandise.

Social media is ubiquitous but not embraced. Our recent Ecommies Study of social media for top online retailers (http://bit.ly/1gATp9p ) proved many have social media accounts but few are "social businesses".

5 Secrets Blog Post on ScentTrail Marketing
http://bit.ly/IYZIo8

5 Secrets Haiku Deck
http://bit.ly/1k6uJFu


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Ken Morrison's comment, December 16, 2013 3:23 AM
Good luck on your 5th Business
malek's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:09 AM

Interesting is the notion of crowdfunding as a new marketing channel

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Future Of Web Design 2

Future Of Web Design 2 | Designing  service | Scoop.it

Web 3.0's Whaam!
Just as Roy Lichtenstein’s Whaam! 1963 seemed to blow abstract painting off the walls web 3.0 will change everything we call "website design". After creating The Future of Web Design #1 (http://sco.lt/7r6zkf) Haiku Deck I realized some shots were fired but not enough.

Web 3.0 powered by a ubiquitous web for people and things with semantic intelligence changes how we create websites and Internet marketing. Math will be a future web designer’s friend. 

Websites will float based on predictive analytics and real time behavior. Behavior responded to with tested creative designed for personas and segments to CONVERT is more Google-like than anything web designers create now.

David Merrill's siftables are the best demonstration of how content will become intelligently self aware AND agnostic to the kind of hubificaiton web designers practice now.

http://youtu.be/JP0w9lZoLwU Siftables

Hubificaiton is about bringing THEM to US. APP-ificaiton is about creating agnostic widgets. Widgets easily placed anywhere (as Amazon's mini-cart widget demonstrates here: http://sco.lt/4iahNZ).

Web 3.0's mobile ubiquitous web will reverse hubification's emphasis on traffic density (bring visitors into a hub). Distinctions will change too. THEM and US will fade in favor of relevant experience in a commons. 

In this context CONVERSION becomes an extension of an experience instead of the other way around. We rarely shop / search for things merely for the pleasure of the search.

 

We may start with one goal in mind and end up achieving a different set of goals, goals created on the fly in real time based on how the web responds to our journey, but our process feels like US.

Predictive analytics, personas, segments and an increasing amount of tested creative controlled by math means our unique feeling of US or ME may continue to exist, but THEIR sense of our next behavior make this feeling a distinction without a difference. 

If you fit a persona, that persona predicts what relevant content you need when the feeling of having Big Brother on your shoulder could be overwhelming. Mutual benefit is why consumers won't revolt.

When websites convert 40% of their traffic, as Schwan's does now, their efficiency trumps density. Efficiency trumping density describes Web 3.0 perfectly.  


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Want To Make MILLIONS Online? Use Images Like This In Your Website Designs

Want To Make MILLIONS Online? Use Images Like This In Your Website Designs | Designing  service | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. True or not, images are an important part of any website we create. Since it is so easy to embed an image in a website (even the process of creating your

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Robin Good's curator insight, March 6, 2013 5:40 AM


If you want to learn how to use images effectively inside your website or blog here is a truly excellent guide by Chistian Vasile on 1WD.


In the guide you will find rational and fact-supported advice on how to choose, place and test image use inside web-based content as well as lots of extremely relevant examples of effective image use online.


From the original article: "...if you manage to find the right pictures and insert them in the right places, they can do wonders for you, as they did for some others."


Well written. Informative. Resourceful. 8/10


Full guide: http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/design/images-on-web-design-usability-guide/



Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, March 9, 2013 2:54 PM

Confessions of A Director of Ecommerce
I've spent the last few years trying to share as many "secrets" as I learned as a Director of Ecommerce. I don't run an ecommerce website anymore so can afford to be generous (lol). 

One of my pet peeves was directing the eye sight line of people in our images. I wanted the eyes pointed at something that mattered. People follow the eye line of those they are looking at. We had three tactics:

1. Gaze straight at visitor - promotes engagement.

2. Gaze directly at a Call To Action - promotes clicks.

3. Gaze at other people in same picture - promotes connection.

 

 We used #1 for pages with broad reach such as our homepage and category top-level pages. 

We used #2 in 4Q on the home page and bending the sight lines of any people in images on a product page works well (our product pages tended to make the PRODUCTS the heroes so few people). 

We used #3 when connection was one of the benefits of a product. If you sell wine, travel or family cars you may want to have pictures of people looking at each other. I would never ONLY have this picture on a webpage since it can make the viewer feel left out. 

The natural companion to the "connection" picture is a picture of a single person gazing out at the viewer. This says, "Yes, we see you, value your visit and want to be friends". 


Websites communicate SO MUCH in covert ways. Balancing what you say with one image such as the people looking at each other with another image to promote engagement is the game you play, the inside baseball "secrets" that separate teams capable of making millions in profits online from those who won't and wonder why :).M 

 

Peter Zalman's curator insight, March 10, 2013 8:06 AM

#cro

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From Brands To Communities - Understanding The Wiki-ization of Marketing

From Brands To Communities - Understanding The Wiki-ization of Marketing | Designing  service | Scoop.it

As social media changes web marketint needw to inspire the kind of commitment, support and contribution made popular by Wiki-pedia. Market, create and communicate MOVEMENTS not simply SALES. Create and curate online community. Understand the Wiki-ization of Marketing.

 


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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:55 PM

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Sébastien Carensac's curator insight, August 19, 2014 5:26 AM

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 19, 2014 6:11 PM

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Cause Marketing And Emotional Design

Cause Marketing And Emotional Design | Designing  service | Scoop.it

Doing good is increasingly the right thing to do and that is the good news. The bad news is many companies are jumping off the "cause marketing" ledge like so many lemmings. 

This new website explains how to embed cause marketing into design, sales and marketing in order to enrich all.  

Steal emotional storytelling tips from these top 10 charities ($ is expenses and use as a model gauge):  


1. American Red Cross $3,329,153,7072
2. Feeding America $1,559,486,3353
3. Smithsonian Instiute $1,101,404,2234
4. World Vision $1,078,549,1555
5. Dana-Faber Cancer Institute $965,097,7186
6. Food For The Poor $950,853,3607
7. American Cancer Society $943,813,2978
8. City of Hope $898,752,8669
9. St. Jude $896,335,00610
10. Nature Convervancy $756,406


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Gamification - Designing for Engagement

Gamification is fundamentally rewriting the rules of engagement and design. We can leverage its techniques to create unprecedented connections with our customer

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, June 1, 2013 8:12 AM

Building Engagement In

There are ways to BUILD engagement into a website's design. Here are three secrets to promote engagement not included in this excellent Slideshare:

* Place Email Subscription High Up and Prominent. 
* Include curated User Generated Content on every page.

* Create CTAs with CONTRAST.

 

Email Subscriptions
When your "Subscribe To Our Email List" Call to Action is high on the page in a Can't Miss It spot you communicate a clear "we want YOU" signal. 

UGC Everywhere
When you curate User Generated Content to your site you communicate how well you listen and care for community members. The website isn't all about YOU and what you think the inclusion of UGC says.

 

CTAs
I see to very common mistakes in websites I'm asked to review as Director of Marketing for Atlantic BT in Raleigh (http://www.atlanticbt.com ): NO CTAs or poorly contrasted CTAs. I PREFER CTAs to be buttons and usually test red, orange or green (depending on the background color). I'm convinced there is no ONE magic CTA color but the contrast is what makes a Call To Action helpful or not, clicked on or not, converting or not.  

Michael Allenberg's curator insight, June 2, 2013 7:17 AM

Engaging and experience should always go hand-in-hand, regardless of the implementation.