Designing service
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Designing  service
One of the misunderstandings of these days is that a designer has an artist or artisan background. In that approach designers are idea generators, visualizers and prototypers.   That is not our point of view. Our adagium comes from the management writer Herbert Simon, who stated that "Everyone designs who devises courses of action  aimed at changing existing into preferred ones".  As stated by others, this version of design tends to abstraction and general expertise.   The focus of this blog is service and services. In our world  service is exchanged for service. All firms are service firms; all markets are centered on the exchange of service, and all economies and societies are service based. And just even government and other institutions are always exchanging services for services. But be sure, in this era of change there is a heavy focus also on concept generation, visualization and digital concept and prototypes.   Interested in designing services? In case you are interested to follow,  check the options in the sidebar. You can follow this blog on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and via email and RSS. It is up to you! In case you are interested to connect on linkedin, please feel free to do so (some of this content is also posted on that platform).  
Curated by Fred Zimny
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The five disciplines of customer experience leaders - Bain Brief - Bain & Company

The five disciplines of customer experience leaders - Bain Brief - Bain & Company | Designing  service | Scoop.it
Designing experiences that consistently impress and stand out from the crowd remains a difficult endeavor, and companies often falter after an initial burst of energy.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, April 24, 2015 7:57 PM

As you look to improve your #customer #experience, make sure you address each question thoroughly:


1. What do we want to stand for in the eyes of our customers?

2. Which handful of actions will generate the most impact with our target customers?

3. How can we use customer feedback to promote learning and behavior change among employees?

4. When we put ourselves in the customer's shoes, what aspects of the experience need to change?

5. How can we anticipate and mitigate the risks, in order to sustain the changes?


Leadership need to have those questions answered:


1. Which groups are the most critical in order to carry out the required changes?

2. How can we equip each group for success?

3. Who can best support and influence the groups?


Share a recent experience within your company undergoing such changes.

Rescooped by Fred Zimny from New Customer - Passenger Experience
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14 #Customer #Experience Predictions For 2014

14 #Customer #Experience Predictions For 2014 | Designing  service | Scoop.it

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, December 27, 2013 4:59 AM

Valuable insight from Jeannie Walters clearly defining the different areas that will impact the #customer #experience.


The end goal is the last point:


"There will be several times in 2014 when you’ll shake your head in disbelief at how wonderful something is. You’ll post images on social media about the best ones, and rave to friends about the corner store/the customer service rep/the bank who showed you they care."


We are all looking forward to such positive experiences.


Any additional trends you would anticipate?



Rescooped by Fred Zimny from New Customer - Passenger Experience
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In #CX, you must accelerate, match or outpace the speed of market transformation

In #CX, you must accelerate, match or outpace the speed of market transformation | Designing  service | Scoop.it
The customer landscape is shifting. It always does. This time, however, the door to Digital Darwinism has been kicked off its hinges. Technology and society are evolving faster than the ability to adapt. Consumers are becoming more connected. As such, they’re more informed. With information comes empowerment. And with new found connectedness and power, customer expectations begin to shatter current sales, marketing, and support models.
Social, mobile, and real-time each contribute to a new reality for customer experiences and engagement.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, November 25, 2014 11:31 PM

As @BrianSolis rightfully points out:


"The customer landscape is shifting. It always does. This time, however, the door to Digital Darwinism has been kicked off its hinges. #Technology and society are evolving faster than the ability to adapt. Consumers are becoming more connected. As such, they’re more informed. With information comes empowerment. And with new found connectedness and power, customer expectations begin to shatter current sales, #marketing, and support models.

#Social, #mobile, and real-time each contribute to a new reality for #customer #experiences and #engagement."


Will your company be ready for the customer of tomorrow?

Darcy Bevelacqua's curator insight, November 26, 2014 4:43 PM

Customers are more connected, informed and empowered than ever. Keeping up with the pace of change is geting more difficult. What are you doing to prepare for tomorrow? 

Michael Allenberg's curator insight, December 8, 2014 8:59 AM

Excellent book from Solis... #innovateorDie

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Why Social Business Should Be Powering The Flexible Working Revolution

Why Social Business Should Be Powering The Flexible Working Revolution | Designing  service | Scoop.it

Imagine if you will where I might be writing this blog from. Do you think it’s from the office? Maybe I’m writing it from my home. Perhaps I’m writing it whilst travelling somewhere on the train. The beautiful thing with modern social communication tools is that the ‘where’ is increasingly irrelevant.


Via Sebastian Thielke
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