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Lessons learned from MITx’s prototype course - MIT News Office

Lessons learned from MITx’s prototype course - MIT News Office | Designed to learn | Scoop.it
As the team behind MIT’s ambitious online learning program gears up to introduce new courses in the fall, it takes stock of its initial experiences.
PaigeCuffe's insight:

More to be done here, but the second last paragraph of this might cause a re-think by many of us about slick vs functional...

(thanks to M Smith at Strathclyde for pointing me to here).

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MOOC completion rates | Katy Jordan - MoocMoocher

MOOC completion rates | Katy Jordan - MoocMoocher | Designed to learn | Scoop.it

While Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) may allow free education on an enormous scale, one of the biggest criticisms raised about MOOCs is that although thousands enrol for courses, a very small proportion actually complete the course. The release of information about enrollment and completion rates from MOOCs appears to be ad hoc at the moment - that is, official statistics are not published for every course. This data visualisation draws together information about enrollment numbers and completion rates from across online news stories and blogs.


Via Peter B. Sloep
PaigeCuffe's insight:

The best collection of numbers related to mooc participation I've seen - so far.  'Participation' is a difficult thing to identify and define in the original cMOOC formats, where it is possible to visit without signing in so whilst unique visitor numbers can be extracted for the core site, engagement is difficult/ not possible to ascertain for these mooc formats.  It is much clearer in xMOOCs, where sign-in is required and often fixed assignments are presented.  In addition, in cMOOCs, and especially in the longer lasting ones (e.g. the 9 month #Change11) the notion of 'participation' isn't based on weekly attendance but on accessing those resources and conversations of interest to that participant. 

So evaluating retention may be an illusion other than for some xMOOCs.

The comments on this blog are worth a careful read, they open discussion on many of the more nuanced points around completion v participation v 'persistence'.  The language used to discuss this is not trivial, as some terms shift responsibility for performance between provider and learner.

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Peter B. Sloep's comment, March 2, 2013 4:10 AM
I am not sure it is the larger number of opportunities to interact that explains the success of larger courses. As long as they use fora without any intelligence for matching people (or filtering out non-matching people), the larger the forum, the more confusing it gets.
Jon Dron's comment, March 3, 2013 8:15 PM
@Peter - the confusion of threaded forums is largely avoided in bigger MOOCs, where most dialogue is involved in problem-solving so rapid responsiveness trumps complexity. In the early Coursera offerings, median response time in forums was 22 minutes, 24 hours a day, which is not bad! However, there are also other communities that develop in both formal and informal settings, Facebook, Twitter, etc, so there are more diverse opportunities to form communities. xMOOCs are overlaid with cMOOC-like networks. I prefer 'persistence rate' too.
catspyjamasnz's comment, March 17, 2013 8:18 AM
The completion rates of MOOCs should not be compared to university completion rates. Compare it rather to the number of people who read your course brochure, and then the number of students who actually enrolled and completed.
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Sheila’s CETIS work blog » Analytics and #moocmooc - the learner's view

Sheila’s CETIS work blog » Analytics and #moocmooc - the learner's view | Designed to learn | Scoop.it

Just finished the #moocmooc and Shiela reflects on how learners she could get a senseof her own engagement and participation. Refers to use of some of Martin Hawksey's visualisation tools.


Via ChrisPegler
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Teaching a MOOC: Lessons Learned & Best Balch Practices

Teaching a MOOC: Lessons Learned & Best Balch Practices | Designed to learn | Scoop.it
I just completed teaching a MOOC on Computational Investing via coursera.org. I did some things right and a lot of things wrong. Here are my lessons learned from the first round. I'm very excited n...
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Another view from inside.  This is from a Coursera MOOC, which therefore has a very specific context and refers to computational investing - so again not entirely generalisable.  Interestingly, the idea of rough and ready presentation quality advocated here is one not necessarily appreciated by many students...

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Times Higher Education - Will Moocs fail to give students help they need?

Times Higher Education - Will Moocs fail to give students help they need? | Designed to learn | Scoop.it
PaigeCuffe's insight:

What cost is there for students new to studying to attempt and not achieve course completion?  This may be a growing discusison, balancing the opportunity provided with the possible effects of moocs.  This gives a catalyst to thinking about the role of support and nature of learning in digital education.

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Blending - European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning

Blending - European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning | Designed to learn | Scoop.it
Learning Design Implementation for Distance e-Learning: Blending Rapid e-Learning Techniques with Activity-based Pedagogies to Design and Implement a Socio-constructivist Environment. Mohammad Issack Santally, Yousra Rajabalee, ...
PaigeCuffe's insight:

Not for the faint-hearted, this lengthy article does set out different approaches in 'distance eLearning' in a detailed fashion and comes to the conclusion that they are not mutually exclusive and can be part of a blended package.  The 3 approaches examined are the e-book approach, rapid e-learning techniques, and online activity-based instructional design.  Two learning design models are proposed for integrating these three and case studies provided.

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