Design Revolution
Follow
Find tag "ecom"
43.7K views | +26 today
Design Revolution
Design Is Revolutionary
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Best-in-Class eCommerce Web Designs via @conversioniq

Best-in-Class eCommerce Web Designs via @conversioniq | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Best In Class From Conversion IQ
The other day I complained about "pretty picture' ecommerce sites that make conversion harder. So much of ecom is ditch digging. Ditch digging to make sure you have things such as:

* Email subscription form (prefer presence to popunders).
* Clearly ECOM - looks like a store with things to sell not content to read.
* Social (easy to find theirs and easy to contribute).
* Content Curation from social / comments / reviews (should feel like a party with people who share love / interests).

* Offers, deadlines and a sense of time (of the year today is Columbus Day for example).

These examples from Conversion IQ are closer to "ditch digging" ecommerce websites. Conversion either BUYING or into a list are easier, more clear and so these designs make more money than the pretty picture websites I shared last (http://sco.lt/4ijZIH ),

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Who Did MoMA Hire To Create Their Web Store? Yugo Nakamura

Who Did MoMA Hire To Create Their Web Store? Yugo Nakamura | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Japanese web designer Yugo Nakamura has created some cool sites. Great clean lines, white backgrounds, splashing of color, movement both real and implied reminds me of Haring, Warhol and de Kooning. #toogood #webdesgin

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

add your insight...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Toward A New Ecommerce - Team Curagami's Magento & WordPress Template Project

Toward A New Ecommerce - Team Curagami's Magento & WordPress Template Project | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Toward A New Ecommerce
The new #ecommerce is beginning to emerge. Curagami, our Durham, NC based startup, is working hard to create new community, merchandising and social media tools to bridge the gap between content and commerce.

This post outlines things every commerce site needs to show quickly such as:

* Is this site SHOPPING or INFORMATION (getting harder and harder to know this right off so want to make SHOPPING obvious).
* Where's my easy to get free shipping?
* Quickly find expected merchandising such as NEW, SALE and BEST SELLERS.
* Are they (the website) open to MY (customer) input (one reason why the sneakers vs. high heels image asks for a story share).

Explain how I used the 8 tips I learned from Vogue (http://shar.es/1nlE2l on http://www.haikudeck.com). Things like the surprise juxtaposition of a women in chuck taylors and picking a fight to support #movementmarkeing are right out of the Vogue playbook.

As always feel free to jump in. Sure we will have a great running conversation on G+: https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/fnFpMLkss4k

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

add your insight...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Best Responsive Ecommerce WordPress Themes

Best Responsive Ecommerce WordPress Themes | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

My favs: Clean Sale (pictured here), Retail Therapy and Kiosk. What are your favorites? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Best New Online Shopping Sites 2013

Best New Online Shopping Sites 2013 | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
These new online shopping sites offer unique presents that you can purchase from the comfort of home.
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

As our Ecommies proved (read Is Ecommerce Stuck in the Mud on Curatti.com linked below) BIG online retailing is pretty moribund. Went in search of NEW, more inspirational shopping and found this post on a host of new ecom websites. Promies an Ecommie Award for the little guys soon.

Ecommies Results on Curatti.com
http://curatti.com/is-ecommerce-stuck-in-the-mud/

Best New Holiday Shopping Websites (maybe)

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/shopping/best-new-online-shopping-sites-holiday-gift-guide-2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

5 Things Amazon Can Teach Your Ecom Site For THIS Holiday

Amazon is becoming a bit of a hot mess as they add streaming and move from things to digital bits, but the big A still has lessons every Ecommerce vet can learn for this holiday including:

* BIG Buy Now Button On Plane with Product Picture.

* Institutionalize Free Shipping (i.e. Prime makes free shipping a loyalty program). 
* Customers Who Bought, Also Bought (great up-sale) on product page.

* Reviews & Review the Reviewer. 
* Social prominent but not overbearing. 

Big Buy Buttons
I like BIG buy buttons (see REI.com) with high contrast. I also like how Amazon puts their Buy button in what is normally a dead-end gutter (far right side of the page) on the same plane as their product headline. 

Free Shipping As Loyalty
Prime is more than Free Shipping. Prime members get free streaming movies and other benefits. Amazon prime may have started as "free shipping" but it is rapidly becoming Amazon's loyalty program as they institutionalize it more and more (brilliant and a #STEALTHIS). 

Up-Sale and Cross-Sale
I like that Amazon tried to sell you the product on the page AND something else. Many ecom sites pitch cross sale and that can get confusing. Customers have worked hard to get to THIS product page so why hit them with a lot of option that create dissonance. Better to say People who've purchased the product you are looking at also bought these other things. This is UP-SALE instead of CROSS-SALE (where you offer other similar items in the hope of making a sale on one of them). 

Cross-Sale is most effective on products where you can move customers from THEIR products to YOUR products or from low margin to higher margin. I'm not in love with this kind of cross-sale because it can be confusing and distracting. Amazon includes cross sale WAY down the page in their "continue shopping" suggestions. 

Review & Review the Reviewer
Most ecom websites have reviews, but few go the next easy step and ask for feedback on reviewers. A simple thumbs up or down on the reviews themselves can identify star reviewers. Writers fight to get on Amazon's review team more for the social kudos than the free books. Your "review team" should be a hotly competed for club too. 

Social (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest)
I would suggest those three social icons at the very least for any e-commerce website. You may also want to add LinkedIn (if you re B2B) or a tool/net like Scoop.it or Paper.li.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

The 20 Best E-Commerce Website Designs Inspire

The 20 Best E-Commerce Website Designs Inspire | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
The e-commerce sector has long been known to develop websites that did not put much focus on design. They tend to get very cluttered and bogged down, consistently suffering from not being user friendly.
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Agree with most of these.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

27 E-commerce Website Designs Scenttrail Hates & Why

27 E-commerce Website Designs Scenttrail Hates & Why | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Marty (Scenttrail) Note: 27 Bad Ecommerce Designs
These CSS Design Award Winning sites illustrate why designers shouldn't be in charge of your commercial website. In a recent G+ post I shared our journey across time, place and money online (Why Time Is Money Online: https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/RdjAjWoJTHw ).

It's easy to get lost. We kept trying to make narrative, movie and book-like) logic work on our ecommerce site and it never did. To the extent we told stories we depressed conversions and we conducted these tests before the web was drowning in content.

Not that the web has been fully "content shocked" to within an inch of its life one of the FIRST jobs any ecommerce site must accomplish is loudly and clearly proclaiming their STORE-NESS.

These 27 "pretty picture" designs are find for big established brands people trust, but they would CRUSH a new commercial site. The "store-ness" is confusing. Are these content sites or can we buy stuff here.

Some communicate some "store-ness",but none have the "ditch digging" realities of large, successful ecom sites such as REI.com or Schwan's.com (highest converting ecom site in world). Call-To-Actions are missing (mostly), navigation is murky and not keyword dense and images don't you line of sight rules (viewers' eyes go where people's eyes in your images go).

Real ecommerce needs a few things to be successful that most of these sites ignore, miss or don't know such as:

* Email subscription forms (email list = your most profitable channel because YOU OWN IT, don't believe BS about email marketing being dead mobile is making email marketing different but dead =nope.
* AN OFFER - see REI.com's "daily deals" or Amazon's ability to sell any and everything.
* Great navigation balanced between seo and customer engagement.
* Images mapped to produce CLICKS where merchants want them.
* Every image, click and share creates analytics and data so part of what you need to map into an ecom design is WHAT DATA YOU NEED. Can't figure out what actionable thing I would know after a month's traffic on these designs.
* Sense of TIME and PLACE (what season are we in? Where are these sites?).
* TRUST and that comes from other people (testimonials, curation of User Generated Content and NONE of these have anything like that so unless they are major brands they won't pass the trust test with many shoppers).
* TRUST MARKS = didn't see a VISA or MC logo either. One way to create trust online is to align with brands and marks people already trust. Those badges look like ugly scars to designers and they help make merchants millions.
* Content - we love VISUAL MARKETING but some context such as the context one satisfied customer would share is a must.
* Design = Trust - we grant that these sites look amazing and looking amazing helps with creating trust, but junk 'em up a little and make more money.

That last bullet reminds me of a story from my P&G tenure. My boss Russ Mills taught me to never leave a display too neat. "People won't disturb a display that is too neat," he explained. These ecommerce designs are too neat for me (by half). If you aren't a major brand ignore every one of these 27 "inspirational" ecom web designs.

PS. Favorite has to be the example in the picture above. Not only do we chop people in half we ask visitors to kiss their behinds (lol). Opposite of the welcoming atmosphere I want to create on my ecom sites (lol) back when I was responsible for millions of online sales yearly. At my core I remain an online merchant, but I don't miss not sleeping and sweating sales numbers from now until Valentine's Day. Don't miss that at all :).


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Deigning Tomorrow's Ecommerce Today

Deigning Tomorrow's Ecommerce Today | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Designing Tomorrow's Ecommerce
I'm writing a blog post for Curatti that will go live at midnight tonight that discusses the "best practices" of "Tomorrow's Ecommerce". I'm also writing a Curagami blog post (also published at midnight) about how social shopping will change Tomorrow's Ecommerce.

Tomorrow's Ecom Current Best Practices (Curatti tonight)
Tomorrow's Ecom Social & Mobile Web (on Curagami now)

The Haiku Deck that bridges both of these posts is linked above and here:
http://shar.es/1nkJef

As we publish each post we will link them here.


Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

add your insight...


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

Ready For Holiday 2014 Ecommerce? 5 Summer To Dos

Ready For Holiday 2014 Ecommerce? 5 Summer To Dos | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Summer = Make or Break
What are you testing this week? Are you testing design, offers, shopping cart or merchandising now? Here are 5 Summer To Dos to help your sales in the 166 days left to Christmas:

Testing Plan
Your testing plan should be FLAT OUT now. Testing after Halloween should be done with great CARE. This means you eat off the "testing meals" you cook now for 3 of the most important months of the year. Here are things we liked to test in the summer:

1 FREE SHIPPING
This year we STRONGLY recommend offering Free Shipping both ways (out and back) and without any hoops to jump through starting about Halloween (i.e. remove your triggers as they start costing you money right around Halloween or at least they did when we tested). We could never get our DM bosses to thing of free shipping as advertising. Shame since we keep placing print ads long after that tactic was dead man walking (now print by itself is crazy).

When you model Free Shipping both ways now remember you need 3x the same customer visits now you will need in November.. In the summer we ran about 3.2 visits before a purchase. After 11.1 that number dropped to 1.5 and by Black Friday it was damn close to a single visit.

2 Offers & Causes
Use that last paragraph to model great offers at this time of year. If an offer lowers the number of return visits needed BOOK IT for November and December since any summer offer should ROCK 4Q (unless the goods are summer related).

We liked to test cause marketing at this time of year. Our demographics were almost even (men to women). Find brand aligned causes and figure out how to help. If you sell auto stuff for trucks you might contribute to Ducks Unlimited for every sale of Chevy parts.

If you sell books contribute to literacy for every bestselling bought in any form (e-book or hardcover). Your cause doesn't have to be so close to your brand especially if you tie-in to the big 5:

American Red Cross
Goodwill
American Cancer Society
Feed Children
Care fore Pets

3 Create & Test Unique Merchandising Combinations
Great time of year to create unique merchandising. Amazon is going to beat any price you have on products with velocity in segments like books, gifts and media. Your only HOPE is to create unique and branding merchandising.

Be sure to create a NEW page and SKU (Stock Keeping Unit) for your new combinations. Link your new combinations from established pages for best sales results. If you've always sold A, B & C offer a new combination of all 3 and give C away free.


Use your metrics to find natural combinations.

4 Free Gifts
If you have Free Shipping both ways and no competitor is following you don't need a free gift. If you can't get free 2 way shipping approved toss in a free gift. Free gifts can't SUCK.

If can't give a gift aligned with your brand and that will delight and surprise DON'T GIVE A FREE GIFT.

5 Social Mentions & Kudos
By far the LEAST expensive idea on this page is LISTEN, THANK and SHARE content your customers share with you. Follow back well more than 50% of your followers cutting out the spammers. You will be amazed how much traction ACKNOWLEDGEMENT creates.

Every follow back and Retweet wins hearts, minds and loyalty best mined NOW for THEN.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

30 Beautiful and Creative Ecommerce Website Designs – Shopify

30 Beautiful and Creative Ecommerce Website Designs – Shopify | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

A blog about ecommerce marketing, running an online business and updates to Shopify's ecommerce community.

Marty Note
Ecommerce is hard to make "BEAUTIFUL". The conventions are well established now such as hero, underneath or to the right of the hero is a line of products, nav leads to category pages then to product pages, big search box and so on.

Here are 30 cool takes on convention that don't spill conversions all over the floor, the danger of modifying ecommerce convention, but do create intelligent and NEW feeling ecom web design.

My favorite is Norwegian Rain because their hero tells such a amazing story with so few words. Very difficult to do a group shot like that without looking too exclusive. Like a club that would never have YOU (the visitor) for a member.


I don't get that feel from their image and design. Very cool and NOTHING I would have considered before seeing that a group shot of that magnitude can be accomplished.

Norwegian Rain
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

2014 Ecommerce Design Trends Infographic via @CrowdFunde

2014 Ecommerce Design Trends Infographic via @CrowdFunde | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Little doubt enterprise crowdfunding will play an important role in ecommerce next year. As the first Ecommies shared on Curatti.com Ecommerce is stuck in its own mud (http://curatti.com/is-ecommerce-stuck-in-the-mud/ ).

CrowdFunde is a new tool that helps add crowdfunding to any website. Crowdfunding is about to explode thanks to the SEC ruling in late October to allow equity crowdfunding.

 

Enterprise crowdfunding is about to explode too and eCommerce will be changed by the addition of a new low cost, high return marketing channel that reminds us of what email marketing used to be before everyone started curating email with mobile devices, driving open rates down even as the size of many lists increase.

This CrowdFunde infographic shares color, growth and tribal acceptance information proving ecommerce is ready for a change, a crowdfunding, and social, mobile, gamified change.

 

more...
Rescooped by Martin (Marty) Smith from AtDotCom Social media
Scoop.it!

Want To Make MILLIONS Online? Use Images Like This In Your Website Designs

Want To Make MILLIONS Online? Use Images Like This In Your Website Designs | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. True or not, images are an important part of any website we create. Since it is so easy to embed an image in a website (even the process of creating your

Via Robin Good, John van den Brink
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Confessions of A Director of Ecommerce
I've spent the last few years trying to share as many "secrets" as I learned as a Director of Ecommerce. I don't run an ecommerce website anymore so can afford to be generous (lol). 

One of my pet peeves was directing the eye sight line of people in our images. I wanted the eyes pointed at something that mattered. People follow the eye line of those they are looking at. We had three tactics:

1. Gaze straight at visitor - promotes engagement.

2. Gaze directly at a Call To Action - promotes clicks.

3. Gaze at other people in same picture - promotes connection.

 

 We used #1 for pages with broad reach such as our homepage and category top-level pages. 

We used #2 in 4Q on the home page and bending the sight lines of any people in images on a product page works well (our product pages tended to make the PRODUCTS the heroes so few people). 

We used #3 when connection was one of the benefits of a product. If you sell wine, travel or family cars you may want to have pictures of people looking at each other. I would never ONLY have this picture on a webpage since it can make the viewer feel left out. 

The natural companion to the "connection" picture is a picture of a single person gazing out at the viewer. This says, "Yes, we see you, value your visit and want to be friends". 


Websites communicate SO MUCH in covert ways. Balancing what you say with one image such as the people looking at each other with another image to promote engagement is the game you play, the inside baseball "secrets" that separate teams capable of making millions in profits online from those who won't and wonder why :).M 

 

more...
Robin Good's curator insight, March 6, 2013 5:40 AM


If you want to learn how to use images effectively inside your website or blog here is a truly excellent guide by Chistian Vasile on 1WD.


In the guide you will find rational and fact-supported advice on how to choose, place and test image use inside web-based content as well as lots of extremely relevant examples of effective image use online.


From the original article: "...if you manage to find the right pictures and insert them in the right places, they can do wonders for you, as they did for some others."


Well written. Informative. Resourceful. 8/10


Full guide: http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/design/images-on-web-design-usability-guide/



Peter Zalman's curator insight, March 10, 2013 8:06 AM

#cro