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18 Surreal Dreamlike Website Designs Inspires

18 Surreal Dreamlike Website Designs Inspires | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
Creative website can say a lot about the company or person it represents. Especially if it's for anyone involved with design.
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Dreamy, floating and surreal these website designs inspire.

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The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding via HuffPost

The Psychology of Color in Marketing and Branding via HuffPost | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Marty Note
Great HuffPost roundup of several important infographics and psychology of color studies. Which ones surprised you? Problem is every website wants ALL of those emotions, but not all at once (lol). Key is picking right color for right content / place on your site.

RED may SUCK as a homepage because it chases people away, but red could ROCK as an accent. Red "buy" buttons have only been beat ONE TIME in thousands of tests we've run. So find the right color conversation and have it at the right time.

At Curagami (http://www.Curagami.com) we think of colors as ways to help tell stories. We try to "match the hatch" of the story we are telling to colors in our images or within supporting graphics such as icons or widgets.

When our story is EXCITING we like RED or variations of it. We may also isolate the red by using black and white. Isolating red makes its power SHOUT in just the right minimal way sometimes. Too much red makes you want to RELAX so we may follow a RED with a soothing green or blue.

Websites are hub and spoke so it van be impossible to map stories to color in sequence. BUT if you match the PAGE to your colors you can win and be sure to daisy chain content telling the same story with enough similar colors and scenttrail to create a sense of connection. If you tell a GREEN story and suddenly smack your readers with too much red they RUN.

Win the page, link the page and win the psychology of color battle in your web design.

And YES I'm breaking my Big Blogs curation rule for the 3rd time in a day (lol). Soon as you state a stupid rule like that you break it and that is a definite RULE (lol). M


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Why Red Is Deadly In Web Design! 15+ Best Examples

Why Red Is Deadly In Web Design! 15+ Best Examples | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Marty Note
Red is an IMPOSSIBLE web design color except when it isn't. There is an excellent comment at the end of this post sharing the best red websites:

Ashley Pajak Comment


I find that red can very easily become too overpowering. Even though some of these are running into that, others display the color proudly and cleverly, such as the Venkat Portfolio and Svizra.

The only design I liked used red as an accent (Project 1,000). Others just made me want to RUN away. When I started designing websites in 1999 I read a book about red, white and black as a powerful combination of design elements.

The book pointed out the power of simple lines and few colors especially when done so from the MINIMAL school of online design made so popular now by MOBILE. There are flashes of that clarity in some of these designs, but red as a base color is tricky and difficult as many of these designs prove..

If you know great red or great red, black and white designs please share and we will update. Thanks, M


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10 Top Flat Webdesigns Inspire

10 Top Flat Webdesigns Inspire | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Great examples of flat webdesigns. Flat looks better as responsive design another way of saying it looks better on phones and pads. My faves here are the doesn't seem flat Beagle Ship and the Boldial WP theme.

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Conversations Scroll Visually: 3 HOT Web Design Trends:

Conversations Scroll Visually: 3 HOT Web Design Trends: | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Check out the hottest web UI patterns used by Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, Kickstarter, AirBnB, Tinder, and more.

Marty Note
This is a great web design scope full of examples and lots of good suggestions. At Curagami we are devoted to the conversations as The Next Ecom idea. Love the suggestion about conversational tone in forms.

Forms SUCK, but that doesn't mean you can ask for things in a MORE INTIMATE way than standard boring routine. The visual organization riff is evidence of a much larger tectonic shift - visual marketing is ruling the world.

Visual Marketing in a nutshell is...

1. GRAB attention with an arresting visual.
2. Tease a read with a great headline.
3. Snipit-ize your content so it daisy chains a series of "play list" like cliff hangers.
4. Move visitors to subscribers and buyers.

5. Create an ASK (such as Join our Ambassador Group).

6. Rinse and Repeat.







Via Jakarta Web Developer
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The 5 Most Aggressively Crazy Websites on the Internet

The 5 Most Aggressively Crazy Websites on the Internet | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
The biggest obstacle in designing websites isn't lack of talent, resources, or creative vision. It's having key pieces of your brain eaten by spiders.

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Sometimes you can learn things from crazy. Sometimes not. M

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10 Website Design Tips for Your Small Business

10 Website Design Tips for Your Small Business | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Learn what to include in your website design before you build and find out the 10 ‘must-haves’ to drive more traffic to your site.

1. Incorporate Keywords.

2. Multiple points of contact.

3. Consistent branding.

4. Call To Actions.
5. EASY to read (font size, short paragraphs, bullet points).
6. EASY to navigate.

7. Important above fold.

8. Load time (faster is better).

9. Build credibility & trust.

10. Social

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Great tips every one of these. My faves are clear CTAs and keywords are your friends :). M

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Why Responsive Web Design Isn’t Enough - Learn A Design

Why Responsive Web Design Isn’t Enough - Learn A Design | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
“With the amount of people using mobile devices to access content online, many websites have started using responsive web design in order to appeal to the greater needs of their online audience. However, a website that’s responsive to changes in the platform it’s being accessed on simply isn’t enough and web users are looking for… Read More »”
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:
SO TRUE, responsive design is MEANS not ENDS. Mobile first requires a healthy rethink of... We'll everything. As we interact in a more social and iterative way our S / R curves. The nature of what we lucky few #Internetmarketers do these days is shifting once again. The #socialmobile web changes the nature! tone and tenor of our interactions. Our customers expect involvement and the ability to interact with US (website creators) and each other (customers).
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Lori Wilk's curator insight, September 15, 3:35 PM

This is a must-read article because there are so many elements to be considered in #webdesign 

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Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine

Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
This article looks at some examples of interaction design in which smart interaction, defined by subtle animation, gently improves the user experience. We’ll share some lessons drawn from various models and analyze why these simple patterns work so well.



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David Swaddle's curator insight, August 31, 7:28 PM

This article got me thinking. It's about transitions in user interface design with some very nice animated examples.

 

Are the transitions shown here useful in a learning context, or are they merely window dressing that detracts from learnability? Personally, I think that while they look nice the first time, most of these transitions become annoying with time, simply delaying users. Mayer and others have shown how eye-candy can often be detrimental to learning.

 

Is it time for some generous academic to re-evaluate the situation in light of recent UX designs, preferably in a corporate setting? Or, maybe somebody already has and some kind soul could post here and point me in the right direction?

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Web & Product Design in Mondrian style [+ @Scenttrail's 1st Web Site circa 1999]

Web & Product Design in Mondrian style [+ @Scenttrail's 1st Web Site circa 1999] | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Mondrian Grids
First website I created in 1999 used a Mondrian grid. FoundObjects.com had SO MUCH information we needed a grid. Since we sold artist inspired gifts and cool stuff such as Magnetic Poetry Kit I worked hard to write the HTML to create a Mondrian grid manually.

There are "new designer" mistakes such as too many fonts and over selling the click I wouldn't make today, but maybe it was worth figuring out how to write the html to do those lines (took weeks and was named in my divorce lol).

I'm not alone in love for Mondrian as this link shows.

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7 Web Design Disasters Drive People Crazy

7 Web Design Disasters Drive People Crazy | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

A poorly designed website has real impacts, whether page views or sales. We won't hesitate to bounce away to another with a better user experience.

1. Requiring users to signup before browsing your site
2. Forgetting about multiple screens

3. Having ridiculous forms to fill out

4. Using hard to read or cutesy fonts

5. Implementing a Search bar that sucks

6. Bombarding the reader with a wall of text
7. Displaying your products with low-res images

MS - 8 Non stop animated gifs (you will discover what I'm talking about)

Marty Note
Agree with all 7 of these annoying disasters and would add an 8th - too many animated gifs all running at the same time with NO STOP.


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Deigning Tomorrow's Ecommerce Today

Deigning Tomorrow's Ecommerce Today | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Designing Tomorrow's Ecommerce
I'm writing a blog post for Curatti that will go live at midnight tonight that discusses the "best practices" of "Tomorrow's Ecommerce". I'm also writing a Curagami blog post (also published at midnight) about how social shopping will change Tomorrow's Ecommerce.

Tomorrow's Ecom Current Best Practices (Curatti tonight)
Tomorrow's Ecom Social & Mobile Web (on Curagami now)

The Haiku Deck that bridges both of these posts is linked above and here:
http://shar.es/1nkJef

As we publish each post we will link them here.


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Finding Stories Inside Paintings via Tracy Chevalier TED Talk [+ 3 Find Your Story Tips via @Scenttrail]

Finding Stories Inside Paintings via Tracy Chevalier TED Talk [+ 3 Find Your Story Tips via @Scenttrail] | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Storytelling & Content Marketing
Tracy Chevalier imagines the stories behind paintings:


* How did the painter meet his model?
* What would explain that look in her eye?
* Why is that man … blushing?

She shares three stories inspired by portraits, including the one that led to her best-selling novel "Girl With a Pearl Earring."

3 Find Your Story Tips
One of the most common "we can't do it" complaints we hear is, "Our content is boring and no one on out team knows how to tell a story".  There are no "boring" products or services and we are surrounded by stories. Here are 5 tips to help you find the magical content needed to wins hearts and minds online.

Story Finder Tip #1: Your Employees
You never need to look far for great stories. Stories of heroic efforts against great odds are sitting in your office now. There are cancer survivors, triathletes and parents with special children in your company as I write this.

You might think, "I don't want to invade their privacy," and we aren't suggesting it. We suggest explaining that any company really only exists in the minds of its employees. Since publishing costs are now zero you can afford to explain who you are by proxy - via your employees stories, passions and loves.

This is "Employee Story of the Month" instead of a banal award your customers learn about the journey your team members have experienced and so feel close to them, you and your brands and products. "I feel like I know you," a woman said hugging my ex at the Gift Show in San Francisco.

Our potential customer learned about Found Objects and Janet McKean from our monthly newsletters. Those newsletters led to the hug and made doing business together easy.


Oh, btw each month I included a short story about Janet's life, experiences and family. May be why I'm divorced (lol), because Janet hated sharing so much. "You married a storyteller, " I would say smiling and writing and well you can figure out how well that worked in our relationship. Worked GREAT with our customers though (lol).

Story Finder Tip 2: Be Like Tracy Imagine An Image's Story
Tracy wrote a best seller by imagining questions implied but not stated. Your online marketing uses images all the time, but what are the questions BEHIND the image.

If you have a picture from a company event who is there? What was being celebrated? What in the image doesn't make sense? Is there something that hints at a mystery o some enigma? Work backwards from an image. Begin like Tracy. Ask questions. The answers are your story.

Story Finder Tip 3: Ask For Customer Stories
Take the image in example #2 and ask your customers to share their questions, stories or answers to hidden riddles. Asking for a story may be too hard and intimidating, but asking what these people in the corner are doing could be fun and spark imaginations and lead to stories.

Once you have an "Ambassador" group of customers / advocates established ask them to help shape your ASK. Ask your advocates to help you know the best way to engage and hear stories your customers are itching to share.

Writing this tip reminds me of a story (of course lol). I left home for the first time. I was in the 10th grade and enrolled at The Choate School. My mom cried when she and my father dropped me off. Now I was sitting in my first English class.

Mr. Noland, a bearded thirty something teacher dressed not unlike every preppie in the room (straight leg corduroys, button down oxford shirt) asked, "Tell me the story of this pencil". He said this hold a pencil inches from his nose and staring at it as he rotated it and waved it up and down.

Dutifully I set out to describe the pencil. "Pencils down," Mr. Noland said asking a student he clearly knew to read his story first. "She couldn't tell why. All she could smell was stale cigar...." the novella this student wrote about a possible murder, broken hearts and a love affair gone wrong made me realize I wasn't in Kansas anymore.

If Mr. Noland's shill can write 500 words on a pencil, YOU can tell a captivating story online about you, your company, brands and products.


Web Design & Stories
Now that you know WHERE to find stories don't forget to DESIGN them in. Sharing stories online is tricky. You want to make readers do a little work to get to a place they can read and read.

Don't do like some and break your stories into tiny 200 word bites. Too much clicking ruins the "all in" feel of a good story. Make your readers click a couple of times to pan out readers from scanners and then let them read.

Will cover more "story design" tips in another post. First FIND your stories since that is often the hardest task. Next create a design that does the impossible - makes it fun to read online.

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Treat Design As Art? Maybe, but Conversations ROCK For Sure!

Treat Design As Art? Maybe, but Conversations ROCK For Sure! | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Paola Antonelli, design curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, wants to spread her appreciation of design -- in all shapes and forms -- around the world.

Marty Note
I like SOME of this TED Talk, but LOVE The conversation below it. The next web, and btw MoMA is NOT on my "must steal from" website list, will be about promoting, curating and sharing conversations just like this one.

The real question is when the CONVERSATION is the website what exactly does that look like? How do we design an online "conversation". Digital "listening" is WORK and an evolving science.

SO, interesting talk from a MoMA curator made SPECIAL by the conversation :). M

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17 Content Rich Sites for Web Design Inspiration

17 Content Rich Sites for Web Design Inspiration | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

We asked several developers what their favorite sources are for web design and code inspiration, and they pointed to these 17 wide-ranging sites.

Marty Note
I like several of these designs including Web Design Ledger and The Source for their creative balance between images, copy and headlines. There are so many things dancing on the head of a pin on any homepage such as:

* Your desire to SHARE everything.

* Their (visitor's) desire to find what they want.

* Navigation.
* Images.
* Headlines & Copy.

Getting all of these dancers to tell a coherent story in 9 seconds is the challenge. Usually as content being shared increases understand decreases. Several of these designs manage to present a lot of options intelligently.

Which one is your fav?

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

BTW, YES I am breaking a rule here and sharing content from a "Big Boy" blog (Mashable). Point I made about NOT curating content from the big boys anymore has exceptions.

Why I Stopped Curating Content From Big Blogs
http://sco.lt/6QV7ib


I used BuzzSumo to find this design post and it has been shared at a moderate level for Mashabale. Design in general is an exception. I don't care WHERE great design content exists I will curate it (lol).

In this case I put a different spin on the Mashable take. They looked at these 17 examples as "good web design". They are that, but they are also great examples of how content can dance with its "tease elements" such as headlines and images.

Design content has to be some of the most READ content on the web  and we learn first and foremost from pictures and, once our attention is fully gained, words.

This was an excellent post and it was 3 levels deep in Mashable now. If this content ever appeared on the "celebrity obsessed" homepage I noted yesterday it was below the fold and a short homepage stay (I'm betting).

This content fits into the "contrary" exception I discussed on G_. I'm riffing solid content in a way they didn't so who cares who created it there is VALUE to be added (i.e. something they didn't see, something important to my readers who try to create sites balanced between content and commerce daily). M

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30 Black And Blue Web Designs Inspire [examples]

30 Black And Blue Web Designs Inspire [examples] | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Details of the website as featured within CoolHomepages web design inspiration gallery.

Marty Note
Blue is a great color. There is a reason blue is many of your visitor's favorite color. Online blue is soothing, easy on the eyes and beautiful against black. My favorite is the UK design "un.titled.co.uk" (used as the image above).

Love using opacity to "hide" things in plain view as that kicks in the curiosity of visitors and gets the click. Current Un.titled site isn't as interesting or special as the design noted here. . Love blue online and these examples show why.

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10 Web Designs Inspire Including "Names For Change" From Durham Urban Ministries

10 Web Designs Inspire Including "Names For Change" From Durham Urban Ministries | Design Revolution | Scoop.it




Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

10 Great 2014 web design examples here. My favorite is the Urban Ministries of Durham "Names for Change" site created by McKinney (I think) right in my backyard (live in Durham, NC).  Great idea and execution.

Durham Urban website
http://umdurham.org/

Names for Change site
https://www.namesforchange.org/



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Picasso At The Beach and The NEW Art of Web Design

Picasso At The Beach and The NEW Art of Web Design | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

PicassoHead App
Sharing this cool "draw a "Picasso Head" app (my PicassoHead http://www.picassohead.com/?id=5290a28#.VBCfth1bqjo.twitter ) to illustrate a few of our favorite web design concepts such as:

* DO LESS and let them DO MORE (them = customers, visitors, advocates_.
* GALLERIES ROCK - especially when your gallery is chock a block full of User Generated Content (UGC).
* Engagement Rocks - do you have a tool that is fun to use AND promotes positive site heuristics such as time on site, pages viewed, lower bounce?
* Every product, idea or website starts about the creators and must become about those who visit and love it.
* People love what THEY create and contribute more than what you do.
* This means all web design is or will be about collaboration.

We love the simplicity of this little app, but the even COOLER riff came from our confirming email. This is the email that shares the link where my Picasso At The Beach drawing lives (linked from this post http://www.picassohead.com/?id=5290a28#.VBCSuy4Lksk.twitter ) and where this little pitch lived:

"This summer check out Picasso Looks at Degas at the Clark in Williamstown, MA. You won’t want to miss this groundbreaking, Clark-exclusive exhibition that is the first to look at Pablo Picasso’s deep fascination with Edgar Degas.

http://www.clarkart.edu/exhibitions/picasso-degas/ "

Wow, cool idea. Create a little art based app and sell related links in the confirmation email. That's brilliant marketing, subtle marketing and the art of web design. Kudos to Picassohead creators RFI Studios, http://www.rfistudios.com.

#toogood



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Lessons In Designing At Scale via Facebook's Margaret Gould Stewart (video)

Facebook’s “like” and “share” buttons are seen 22 billion times a day, making them some of the most-viewed design elements ever created. Margaret Gould Stewa...

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The 10 Most Blatant Design Ripoffs in Social Media

The 10 Most Blatant Design Ripoffs in Social Media | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
In social media, original web design is hard to come by, but some sites are bigger copycats than others. Here are the 10 worst offenders.

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

This was fun. Picasso said good artist imitate great artist steal and these guys sure know how to steal.

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What is SEO? Content Tips For Graphic Designers - HOW Design & Scenttrail Note

What is SEO? Content Tips For Graphic Designers - HOW Design & Scenttrail Note | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

How strong is your content marketing strategy? What is SEO, anyway? Read 6 SEO tips and tricks to help you boost the visibility of your web content.

1. Strong Copy Trumps SEO.
2. Do Keyword Research.
3. Share Link Love (i.e. create great content).

Marty Note
Interesting to see how How Design explains SEO to graphic designers. I would take a slightly different tack. Let's reframe SEO in ways graphic designers can understand and adapt.

I create content daily and am learning SLOWLY how to make headlines sing and links flow in. As competition for links goes UP with the rising tide of content publishers are the right side of the bell curve where more than average links reside will learn a few tricks from graphic designers such as:

* ARRESTING Images.
* Demand hierarchy.
* Clear Calls To Action (CTAs).
* Headlines that GRAB and HOLD.

Content that doesn't get read doesn't help. The first rule of getting your content read is find an ARRESTING related image you won't get sued to use. Haiku Deck (http://www.haikudeck.com) is one of my favorite visual marketing tools. Need lawsuit free arresting images? Use Haiku Deck.

Demand Hierarchy is keeping demands on your visitors LOW. When I was a Director of Ecommerce we did extensive analysis of our 40+ homepage links and 5 mattered. Vicious 90%/10% rule in links. Key is to lower choice and eliminate the superfluous. 

CTAs don't have to be "buy now" anymore. We love asking a question with the link between the present page and the answer. Want To Be A Great Internet Marketer? Highlight and underline that sentence and it will get clicked because it is an IMPLIED CTA.

This doesn't mean we are above a good "Learn More", but too many "old style" CTAs can get boring and lose their punch.

Finally your HEADLINE or subheads matter. Headlines should set a hook. Subheads should organize the answer so readers can scan and skip sections. I try to live by the 7 word rule.

I read this rule about roadside billboards. Billboard creators limit their copy to 7 words because who can read more zipping buy at 60 mph. We all zip by at 100 mph on the web these days so short, punchy headlines that align with your arresting image and plant a hook work best.

We like KEYWORDS, Brands and questions in headlines too. Questions create curiosity. Keywords create scenttrail and brands create comfort and "like me" feelings of trust and security.


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What Waiting Tables Taught Me About Designing Better Websites w/ UX Design

What Waiting Tables Taught Me About Designing Better Websites w/ UX Design | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
What do waiting tables and UX design have in common? One UX director weighs in on how we can learn how to handle design problems from the physical world.



Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Waiting tables is great training for many professions. Waiting, or serving people, teaches many important skills such as listening, being nice and being careful. In this excellent How Design post a UX (User Experience) designer talks about lessons learned waiting tables that help him design better websites.


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Michael Allenberg's curator insight, September 4, 8:17 AM

Excellent take on life Experiences... Trust me, I know.

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15+ Awesome Food Web Designs & One BIG Mistake Your Design Can Learn From

15+ Awesome Food Web Designs & One BIG Mistake Your Design Can Learn From | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Marty Note
Food Websites are great places to learn key elements of web design such as:

* Sensual and romantic images.
* Great mouth watering headlines.
* Visual marketing storytelling.

I like http://www.whitmansnyc.com/ and Soup Peddler. Whitmans BRANDS a hamburger beautifully. Food is HARD to shoot. Food can easily look TERRIBLE in a picture especially a picture with limited web resolution. Whitmans solves that problem creatively with a thin transparent layer between us and the burger. Well done!

Soup Peddler, in the example shown, is the ONLY site that includes PEOPLE. Foodies have "widget-itis" worse than techies. Widget don't sell as well as PEOPLE.

The SINGLE possible exception to that rule might be a foodie site, the one in 10M foodie sites that creates INCLUSION with their food. Whitman's is close since a hamburger is a universal thing, but the site remains a tad sterile due to lack of community.

If you scroll down below Whatman's hero you will see another pet peeve. WHY do web designers EVER let someone show an interior image WITHOUT PEOPLE.

Yes the lines are clean and the emptiness is sort of beautiful, but think about the NONVERBAL communication sent by an empty room. How long do you stay in an empty room when there is a party going on next door?

Food Heroes
So, foodie sites need people. There are several ways I would work people into the equation so the story being  told feels more inclusive and fun:

* Chef as Hero.
* People with SMILES looking UP at chef or waitstaff.
* Fan as hero (with story).

Food heroes (largest image on the page = hero) need to be QUIET and CONFIDENT. Too much NOISE or any WEAKNESS and we don't trust a website (or eat their food).

The CHEF is a hero that WORKS for any restaurant. Seeing Wolfgang Puck creates a brand. Seeing a chef wearing whites with a slightly stained towel over his (or her) shoulder says, "My food is so amazing you haven't LIVED until you've eaten here".

Instead of EMPTY rooms the picture is smiling, well dressed people looking up at the Chef or waitstaff listening in rapt attention. Better if dishes are gone b/c signals meal is over and everyone is still smiling (a tacit endorsement).

DON'T STAGE THIS PHOTO. Shoot it when a group is in for dinner (with permission and releases). Share the event and caption the photo. NEVER stage actors in food websites. Canned art + food says NO TRUST and DANGEROUS.

If your fans are MODEL good looking TELL THE STORY of the event that prompted the picture. What was being celebrated, shared or discussed. If the group is a nonprofit your restaurant supports MORE THE BETTER as you can tell 2 stories in one (risky but worth it).

Finally, you can feature a fan in your hero, BUT same "no canned or artificial" photos here either. ALSO, click me through to a page of pictures of other fans and stories (why they wanted to share their picture and story about FOOD i.e. make sure people know they aren't related :).

Food is SO individual, what I like and what you like can be very different, so think about the 5 stories you need to tell that "star" your content (i.e. tells the stories that cover the rainbow of your food's tribes).


One story shares love of sauces and sweet. Another story tells the visual romance story. Another might discuss meeting the chef and getting to know the "people behind the scenes".


Sharing different and strategically savvy stories creates the "like me" connection with the different tribes your food, restaurant and content should attract. Every restaurant has a passion. Share that passion.

Also share the reception the food creates, the passion others have for the food. Tell those stories in those ways and your foodie (or other) website wins hearts, minds and loyalty.

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Ever Heard of Rubik Cubism By Graffiti Artist Invader? Video explains

Rubik Cubism
The French graffiti artist invader figured how to create art using Rubik Cubes. Wonder how we could use this idea online in web design?

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Toward A New Ecommerce - Team Curagami's Magento & WordPress Template Project

Toward A New Ecommerce - Team Curagami's Magento & WordPress Template Project | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Toward A New Ecommerce
The new #ecommerce is beginning to emerge. Curagami, our Durham, NC based startup, is working hard to create new community, merchandising and social media tools to bridge the gap between content and commerce.

This post outlines things every commerce site needs to show quickly such as:

* Is this site SHOPPING or INFORMATION (getting harder and harder to know this right off so want to make SHOPPING obvious).
* Where's my easy to get free shipping?
* Quickly find expected merchandising such as NEW, SALE and BEST SELLERS.
* Are they (the website) open to MY (customer) input (one reason why the sneakers vs. high heels image asks for a story share).

Explain how I used the 8 tips I learned from Vogue (http://shar.es/1nlE2l on http://www.haikudeck.com). Things like the surprise juxtaposition of a women in chuck taylors and picking a fight to support #movementmarkeing are right out of the Vogue playbook.

As always feel free to jump in. Sure we will have a great running conversation on G+: https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/fnFpMLkss4k

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Drop These 15 Web Design Buzz Words At Your Next Hipster Party

Drop These 15 Web Design Buzz Words  At Your Next Hipster Party | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
You'll never feel left out at a hipster web design party with these 15 key terms under your belt
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Yes a little knowledge is a dangerous thing and most of our web designers at http://www.Curagami.com wouldn't know CMYK if it jumped up and smacked 'em, but knowing these other 14 "web design buzz words" is a good idea. Since we hang out at a least one hipster web design party a week we can fit right in (lol). M

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