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How To Design A Seductive Website [Slideshare]

Marty Note
Websites start cold and off putting. We buy from people we trust and who entertain and share. Entertainment has and will always be a form of seduction. How do you move a cold medium such as a website to the warmth necessary to entertain and seduce? Great tips in this slideshare. 


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Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine

Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
This article looks at some examples of interaction design in which smart interaction, defined by subtle animation, gently improves the user experience. We’ll share some lessons drawn from various models and analyze why these simple patterns work so well.



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Web & Product Design in Mondrian style [+ @Scenttrail's 1st Web Site circa 1999]

Web & Product Design in Mondrian style [+ @Scenttrail's 1st Web Site circa 1999] | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Mondrian Grids
First website I created in 1999 used a Mondrian grid. FoundObjects.com had SO MUCH information we needed a grid. Since we sold artist inspired gifts and cool stuff such as Magnetic Poetry Kit I worked hard to write the HTML to create a Mondrian grid manually.

There are "new designer" mistakes such as too many fonts and over selling the click I wouldn't make today, but maybe it was worth figuring out how to write the html to do those lines (took weeks and was named in my divorce lol).

I'm not alone in love for Mondrian as this link shows.

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7 Web Design Disasters Drive People Crazy

7 Web Design Disasters Drive People Crazy | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

A poorly designed website has real impacts, whether page views or sales. We won't hesitate to bounce away to another with a better user experience.

1. Requiring users to signup before browsing your site
2. Forgetting about multiple screens

3. Having ridiculous forms to fill out

4. Using hard to read or cutesy fonts

5. Implementing a Search bar that sucks

6. Bombarding the reader with a wall of text
7. Displaying your products with low-res images

MS - 8 Non stop animated gifs (you will discover what I'm talking about)

Marty Note
Agree with all 7 of these annoying disasters and would add an 8th - too many animated gifs all running at the same time with NO STOP.


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Deigning Tomorrow's Ecommerce Today

Deigning Tomorrow's Ecommerce Today | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Designing Tomorrow's Ecommerce
I'm writing a blog post for Curatti that will go live at midnight tonight that discusses the "best practices" of "Tomorrow's Ecommerce". I'm also writing a Curagami blog post (also published at midnight) about how social shopping will change Tomorrow's Ecommerce.

Tomorrow's Ecom Current Best Practices (Curatti tonight)
Tomorrow's Ecom Social & Mobile Web (on Curagami now)

The Haiku Deck that bridges both of these posts is linked above and here:
http://shar.es/1nkJef

As we publish each post we will link them here.


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Finding Stories Inside Paintings via Tracy Chevalier TED Talk [+ 3 Find Your Story Tips via @Scenttrail]

Finding Stories Inside Paintings via Tracy Chevalier TED Talk [+ 3 Find Your Story Tips via @Scenttrail] | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Storytelling & Content Marketing
Tracy Chevalier imagines the stories behind paintings:


* How did the painter meet his model?
* What would explain that look in her eye?
* Why is that man … blushing?

She shares three stories inspired by portraits, including the one that led to her best-selling novel "Girl With a Pearl Earring."

3 Find Your Story Tips
One of the most common "we can't do it" complaints we hear is, "Our content is boring and no one on out team knows how to tell a story".  There are no "boring" products or services and we are surrounded by stories. Here are 5 tips to help you find the magical content needed to wins hearts and minds online.

Story Finder Tip #1: Your Employees
You never need to look far for great stories. Stories of heroic efforts against great odds are sitting in your office now. There are cancer survivors, triathletes and parents with special children in your company as I write this.

You might think, "I don't want to invade their privacy," and we aren't suggesting it. We suggest explaining that any company really only exists in the minds of its employees. Since publishing costs are now zero you can afford to explain who you are by proxy - via your employees stories, passions and loves.

This is "Employee Story of the Month" instead of a banal award your customers learn about the journey your team members have experienced and so feel close to them, you and your brands and products. "I feel like I know you," a woman said hugging my ex at the Gift Show in San Francisco.

Our potential customer learned about Found Objects and Janet McKean from our monthly newsletters. Those newsletters led to the hug and made doing business together easy.


Oh, btw each month I included a short story about Janet's life, experiences and family. May be why I'm divorced (lol), because Janet hated sharing so much. "You married a storyteller, " I would say smiling and writing and well you can figure out how well that worked in our relationship. Worked GREAT with our customers though (lol).

Story Finder Tip 2: Be Like Tracy Imagine An Image's Story
Tracy wrote a best seller by imagining questions implied but not stated. Your online marketing uses images all the time, but what are the questions BEHIND the image.

If you have a picture from a company event who is there? What was being celebrated? What in the image doesn't make sense? Is there something that hints at a mystery o some enigma? Work backwards from an image. Begin like Tracy. Ask questions. The answers are your story.

Story Finder Tip 3: Ask For Customer Stories
Take the image in example #2 and ask your customers to share their questions, stories or answers to hidden riddles. Asking for a story may be too hard and intimidating, but asking what these people in the corner are doing could be fun and spark imaginations and lead to stories.

Once you have an "Ambassador" group of customers / advocates established ask them to help shape your ASK. Ask your advocates to help you know the best way to engage and hear stories your customers are itching to share.

Writing this tip reminds me of a story (of course lol). I left home for the first time. I was in the 10th grade and enrolled at The Choate School. My mom cried when she and my father dropped me off. Now I was sitting in my first English class.

Mr. Noland, a bearded thirty something teacher dressed not unlike every preppie in the room (straight leg corduroys, button down oxford shirt) asked, "Tell me the story of this pencil". He said this hold a pencil inches from his nose and staring at it as he rotated it and waved it up and down.

Dutifully I set out to describe the pencil. "Pencils down," Mr. Noland said asking a student he clearly knew to read his story first. "She couldn't tell why. All she could smell was stale cigar...." the novella this student wrote about a possible murder, broken hearts and a love affair gone wrong made me realize I wasn't in Kansas anymore.

If Mr. Noland's shill can write 500 words on a pencil, YOU can tell a captivating story online about you, your company, brands and products.


Web Design & Stories
Now that you know WHERE to find stories don't forget to DESIGN them in. Sharing stories online is tricky. You want to make readers do a little work to get to a place they can read and read.

Don't do like some and break your stories into tiny 200 word bites. Too much clicking ruins the "all in" feel of a good story. Make your readers click a couple of times to pan out readers from scanners and then let them read.

Will cover more "story design" tips in another post. First FIND your stories since that is often the hardest task. Next create a design that does the impossible - makes it fun to read online.

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Treat Design As Art? Maybe, but Conversations ROCK For Sure!

Treat Design As Art? Maybe, but Conversations ROCK For Sure! | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Paola Antonelli, design curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, wants to spread her appreciation of design -- in all shapes and forms -- around the world.

Marty Note
I like SOME of this TED Talk, but LOVE The conversation below it. The next web, and btw MoMA is NOT on my "must steal from" website list, will be about promoting, curating and sharing conversations just like this one.

The real question is when the CONVERSATION is the website what exactly does that look like? How do we design an online "conversation". Digital "listening" is WORK and an evolving science.

SO, interesting talk from a MoMA curator made SPECIAL by the conversation :). M

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Imagine There Are No "Websites", Now Create A Website - David Merrill & Siftables

Imagine There Are No "Websites", Now Create A Website - David Merrill & Siftables | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Websites Are Dead Men Walking
At our Startup Factory Funded startup Curagami (http://www.Curagami.com) we've been thinking about the end of tactical marketing. When we were helping The Man make millions online we could do so with TACTICS.

When our team was 2% better at SEO, PPC or email marketing we made millions. "Catch up" time, the time it took competitors to zero out the tactical advantage, took a long time. Sometimes we had YEARS on tactics such as content marketing.

We started content marketing in 2003 and NO ONE CARED until about 2010 / 2011. Oh, our traffic, the traffic that comes from Google, is related to our content. Whoops, okay NOW we care.

As websites become more mission critical in all companies the time an elite priesthood can have a tactic to themselves is shrinking fast. Now extend our thinking about tactics and you begin to understand why the web of boxes, borders and "sites" is so OVER.

As social media scales our loyalty is increasingly to EACH OTHER. Think of how your life changes as your personal network scales:

* Search less, ask more (ask friends, followers and friends of friends).
* Consume less, collaborate more.
* Understand MORE & FASTER.
* Curate More Than Create.
* Engineer, Quant and Artist.


NOW, imagine how you DESIGN a non-website website. Here are some things you will need:

* ASKS are legitimate ONLY in a sea of legitimacy (create that).
* Collaboration depends on EASE and TRUST (get those).

* Images, Copy, Navigation & Social ARE THE SAME THING.
* Leave ROOM for their notes (user generated content).
* Curate more than you create.
* Create Siftable-like "blocks" & relate them to each other & US.

That last bullet is where artist (web designers), engineers (programmers) and quants (data analysts) collide to create an artistic experience capable of correcting itself via flexible business rules and "on call" creative.

Now imagine how to TEST in such a dynamic POOL of content, curation and near real time reactions (thanks to the social / mobile web). Today we test and validate conclusions. The orange add to cart button beats the green button.

Tomorrow we test POSSIBILITIES. Once we test "possible" Multivariate testing wins. Once MVT testing wins you MUST mashup a cross functional team (designers, quants, marketing) because A/B testing will be to static and yesterday's news.


What about you? What do you think is next in web design?


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Should Our Web Designs Be Harder? Adding DEMANDS Back Into Our Web Designs

Should Our Web Designs Be Harder? Adding DEMANDS Back Into Our Web Designs | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Making Demands Again & Designing Design In
At our Startup Factory funded startup Curagami we've been asking questions about how online communities are built and sustained. We are beginning to connect some important ideas from great thinkers:

Dan Ariely TED Talk on Meaning, Work and Motivation
http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_ariely_what_makes_us_feel_good_about_our_work

Trendwatching Report on "Demanding Brands"
http://trendwatching.com/trends/demandingbrands/

Daniel Pink's book Drive: Surprising Truth Behind What Motivates Us
http://www.danpink.com/books/drive


Content Marketing Triptych
http://sco.lt/4iT0xl

Web Design & "Work"

Yes, we now realize, you can make your website too easy. You can also make it too hard. Perceptions of "hard" and "easy" are highly relative judgements. An experts will find things easy the novice find very difficult.

SO one of the most important ideas for designing "work" into a website is finding a way to put people of similar levels of understanding in the same bus. We thinking of all visitors in 3 cohorts or tribes:

* Novice or new to whatever the site is sharing.
* Learning and so exposed to and thinking about the subject.

* Expert able to teach the Novice and Learning group.

At first we thought we should cluster members of each of these tribes into their own paths. All novices together, all learners together. After listening to Malcolm Gladwell and refining some of our testing conditions we realize such artificial selection harms rather than helps.

Community Is The Key
The key is creation of online community where peer to peer interaction is possible, supported, encouraged and rewarded. We, as website designers, can't combine our Lego blocks in as many variations as possible given the real creativity and engagement of our customers.

The ONLY thing we can do as web designers is clearly communicate OUR creation story, provide access to our Lego-blocks and CURATE the cool creations of our tribe.

The rub comes in at the "provide access to our Lego-blocks" web design stage. If your blocks encourage creativity and just the right amount of work your customers will want to SHOW YOU their creations as we learned from our friends at Haiku Deck.

Our interaction with Haiku Deck helped us create the Content Marketing Triptych:

* Tool that engages the BUILDER in us.
* Gallery where tool users share their creations (their work).
* Personal Profile (their content on your site).

The missing "magic box" for web designers is knowing WHO to ASK what. These ideas are "live ammunition" for ecommerce merchants. Too much work and you lose money. Too little and you lose the opportunity to win hearts and minds through just the right amount of work on top of the perfect contextually relevant ask.

What IS clear is finding ways to make demands and reward what our customers and advocates do with those demands is a CSF (Critical Success Factor) to winning web design. What are your experiences with building work back into your marketing?

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5 Holiday Website Design Tips - A Haiku Deck by Martin Smith & Team Curagami

5 Holiday Website Design Tips - A Haiku Deck by Martin Smith & Team Curagami | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
This holiday selling season (2014) will happen as close to real time as any thanks to the social / mobile web. Listening and curating are going to be important, but so is tapping the nostalgia and spirit of the season in creative and collaborative ways.

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70 Stunning Responsive Sites Inspire #responsive #webdesign

70 Stunning Responsive Sites Inspire #responsive #webdesign | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
Mobify is a mobile e-commerce optimization platform used by leading online retailers to deliver exceptional responsive shopping experiences.

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Attending Search Exchange in Charlotte and MOBILE seems to be the dominant theme so here are 70 examples of responsive web design. On a laptop or desktop and want to see "responsive" design? Shrink your window and watch as the content adjusts to tablet and then phone size.

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5 Quick Tips About Images & Web Design

5 Quick Tips About Images & Web Design | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Hard Won Lessons
I spent almost a million dollars of OPM (Other People's Money) learning these five lessons about images and web design, so lessons learned the hard way:

1. Portraits Are Powerful
Portrait images where the model looks directly at the camera, are powerful "welcoming" images great for home, about and category "splash" pages.

2. Babies are DYNAMITE - Use Carefully
Thanks to our ancient caveman brain we can't NOT look at babies. Problem is that is not a secret so babies are now overused to hock insurance, tires and shampoo. If you use a baby my preference is to have the baby looking AT something.

Visitors eyes go where the eyes of people (or babies) are looking, so point your baby image directly at an important Call-to-Action and bet your conversions go up.

3. People Talking To Each Other = DANGEROUS
There may be context where it makes sense for you to have an image where people in the image are huddled together, but I doubt it. If you have two people huddled and a third looking directly out at the camera the image works better.

We respect a huddle. We don't want to intrude, so your web image is working against your online marketing purpose. Your image says we are here having a conversation and YOU (visitor) aren't invited. Not a good idea.

4. People Sell Better Than Widgets, but...
I  prefer to tell human stories even about the most widgety widget, but people bring "like me" problems too. Every visitor is looking for "like me" signals. If you know your archetype and tribe well enough to risk it use images of people consistent with your understanding.

If you have a wide variety of customers and members best to avoid single archetype "like me" images. This is yet another reason I like portraits. Portraits are "universal" meaning the welcoming look directly at the camera removes some of the "must be like me to engage" requirements.

5. In Action Shots Use The MOVEMENT
If your image is riding a bicycle POINT the movement at something important. I don't like movement images as heroes (largest images on a page is called a hero), but I love them in "sub-hero" images because movement creates excitement and allows me to direct the visitor's eyes where we want them to go.

Use these 5 hard won tips and your images won't fight your site's desire to connect, create community and convert visitors into buyers and members.



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Michael Allenberg's curator insight, July 25, 5:48 AM

Having spent over a decade as a professional photographer, this is spot on! Of utmost interest to Experience Designers interested in persuasive design methodologies! 

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Hero Marketing: Heroes Write Like This 40 Great Headlines

Hero Marketing: Heroes Write Like This 40 Great Headlines | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
Depending on your brand and message some can be very professional and straight to the point, and others a bit more relaxed and playful. Here is a collection of taglines and intro messages from freelance designers and design agencies around the world for your inspiration.

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Tomorrow is Hero Marketing Day. Writing a post for http://www.curagami.com about discovering hero marketing the ahrd way, creating lists of favorite hero curators and gurus and asking YOU  to share your hero stories as Phil Buckley, Curagami Co-Founder did on G+ https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/C9tZjo658L7 ).

Whose Your Hero?

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Beauty, Data Visualization & Web Design's Future - TED Video w/ David McCandless

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/david-mccandless-the-beauty-of-data-visualization David McCandless turns complex data sets, like worldwide milita...


Marty's Take On Web Design & Data Visualization
Had an interesting conversation with Curagami ( http://www.Curagami.com ) co-founder Phil Buckley at lunch yesterday. We were discussing my attempt to change the CSS on the Hack Headphones Shopify store I'm creating. 

I shared how I found a post on how to change the buy button. I wanted a bigger button. The problem was the post with the answer must have been 2 or more iterations behind the theme I'm using.

The change moved slightly unintelligible java to completely unintelligible code (at least for me). Where once there was a "height" variable now there were nested variables.

Welcome to the future of web design.

If a company with more Ph.Ds than almost anyone, Google, decides to float their index creating a responsive float that seems to wrap search results around searchers like a blanket WHY don't we lucky few Internet marketers realize that's the planet we are all in transit to?

The New Web Designer
Once a "website" becomes a series of interlocking "IF" "THEN" statements "designing" a website becomes an exercise in data visualization.  

Design in a variable world is different as this great data visualization TED video shares (stay with it as the visual candy gets better in the middle).  The skills need to be this "new designer" include but are not limited to:

* Spatial reasoning and intelligence.

* Ability to read and translate metrics into meaningful images (i.e. data visualization).
* Enough Javascript to choke a horse.

* Even more CSS as everything is floating in a variable galaxy.
* Understanding how variables and results should influence design, color, layout in order to increase engagement and conversion.

If this sounds like the silos between design, code, marketing, research, sales and customer service are coming down fast we agree.  

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What Waiting Tables Taught Me About Designing Better Websites w/ UX Design

What Waiting Tables Taught Me About Designing Better Websites w/ UX Design | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
What do waiting tables and UX design have in common? One UX director weighs in on how we can learn how to handle design problems from the physical world.



Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Waiting tables is great training for many professions. Waiting, or serving people, teaches many important skills such as listening, being nice and being careful. In this excellent How Design post a UX (User Experience) designer talks about lessons learned waiting tables that help him design better websites.


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15+ Awesome Food Web Designs & One BIG Mistake Your Design Can Learn From

15+ Awesome Food Web Designs & One BIG Mistake Your Design Can Learn From | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Marty Note
Food Websites are great places to learn key elements of web design such as:

* Sensual and romantic images.
* Great mouth watering headlines.
* Visual marketing storytelling.

I like http://www.whitmansnyc.com/ and Soup Peddler. Whitmans BRANDS a hamburger beautifully. Food is HARD to shoot. Food can easily look TERRIBLE in a picture especially a picture with limited web resolution. Whitmans solves that problem creatively with a thin transparent layer between us and the burger. Well done!

Soup Peddler, in the example shown, is the ONLY site that includes PEOPLE. Foodies have "widget-itis" worse than techies. Widget don't sell as well as PEOPLE.

The SINGLE possible exception to that rule might be a foodie site, the one in 10M foodie sites that creates INCLUSION with their food. Whitman's is close since a hamburger is a universal thing, but the site remains a tad sterile due to lack of community.

If you scroll down below Whatman's hero you will see another pet peeve. WHY do web designers EVER let someone show an interior image WITHOUT PEOPLE.

Yes the lines are clean and the emptiness is sort of beautiful, but think about the NONVERBAL communication sent by an empty room. How long do you stay in an empty room when there is a party going on next door?

Food Heroes
So, foodie sites need people. There are several ways I would work people into the equation so the story being  told feels more inclusive and fun:

* Chef as Hero.
* People with SMILES looking UP at chef or waitstaff.
* Fan as hero (with story).

Food heroes (largest image on the page = hero) need to be QUIET and CONFIDENT. Too much NOISE or any WEAKNESS and we don't trust a website (or eat their food).

The CHEF is a hero that WORKS for any restaurant. Seeing Wolfgang Puck creates a brand. Seeing a chef wearing whites with a slightly stained towel over his (or her) shoulder says, "My food is so amazing you haven't LIVED until you've eaten here".

Instead of EMPTY rooms the picture is smiling, well dressed people looking up at the Chef or waitstaff listening in rapt attention. Better if dishes are gone b/c signals meal is over and everyone is still smiling (a tacit endorsement).

DON'T STAGE THIS PHOTO. Shoot it when a group is in for dinner (with permission and releases). Share the event and caption the photo. NEVER stage actors in food websites. Canned art + food says NO TRUST and DANGEROUS.

If your fans are MODEL good looking TELL THE STORY of the event that prompted the picture. What was being celebrated, shared or discussed. If the group is a nonprofit your restaurant supports MORE THE BETTER as you can tell 2 stories in one (risky but worth it).

Finally, you can feature a fan in your hero, BUT same "no canned or artificial" photos here either. ALSO, click me through to a page of pictures of other fans and stories (why they wanted to share their picture and story about FOOD i.e. make sure people know they aren't related :).

Food is SO individual, what I like and what you like can be very different, so think about the 5 stories you need to tell that "star" your content (i.e. tells the stories that cover the rainbow of your food's tribes).


One story shares love of sauces and sweet. Another story tells the visual romance story. Another might discuss meeting the chef and getting to know the "people behind the scenes".


Sharing different and strategically savvy stories creates the "like me" connection with the different tribes your food, restaurant and content should attract. Every restaurant has a passion. Share that passion.

Also share the reception the food creates, the passion others have for the food. Tell those stories in those ways and your foodie (or other) website wins hearts, minds and loyalty.

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Ever Heard of Rubik Cubism By Graffiti Artist Invader? Video explains

Rubik Cubism
The French graffiti artist invader figured how to create art using Rubik Cubes. Wonder how we could use this idea online in web design?

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Toward A New Ecommerce - Team Curagami's Magento & WordPress Template Project

Toward A New Ecommerce - Team Curagami's Magento & WordPress Template Project | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Toward A New Ecommerce
The new #ecommerce is beginning to emerge. Curagami, our Durham, NC based startup, is working hard to create new community, merchandising and social media tools to bridge the gap between content and commerce.

This post outlines things every commerce site needs to show quickly such as:

* Is this site SHOPPING or INFORMATION (getting harder and harder to know this right off so want to make SHOPPING obvious).
* Where's my easy to get free shipping?
* Quickly find expected merchandising such as NEW, SALE and BEST SELLERS.
* Are they (the website) open to MY (customer) input (one reason why the sneakers vs. high heels image asks for a story share).

Explain how I used the 8 tips I learned from Vogue (http://shar.es/1nlE2l on http://www.haikudeck.com). Things like the surprise juxtaposition of a women in chuck taylors and picking a fight to support #movementmarkeing are right out of the Vogue playbook.

As always feel free to jump in. Sure we will have a great running conversation on G+: https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/fnFpMLkss4k

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Drop These 15 Web Design Buzz Words At Your Next Hipster Party

Drop These 15 Web Design Buzz Words  At Your Next Hipster Party | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
You'll never feel left out at a hipster web design party with these 15 key terms under your belt
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Yes a little knowledge is a dangerous thing and most of our web designers at http://www.Curagami.com wouldn't know CMYK if it jumped up and smacked 'em, but knowing these other 14 "web design buzz words" is a good idea. Since we hang out at a least one hipster web design party a week we can fit right in (lol). M

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Web and Graphic Design Trends 2014 – Infographic via istock (Midyear Check)

Web and Graphic Design Trends 2014 – Infographic via istock (Midyear Check) | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

This is the most shared, visited and viewed post on Design Revolution. December is always HOT for trend predictions.  Interesting to look over December's predictions to see if they are coming true:

1 & 2 Diverse Women & Hands Dirty Dads
Gladly we are seeing both of these trends. Loved Dove's What Dad's Really Do campaign
http://adweek.it/1kYVCwI

3. Beards
Yes beards on on the rise thanks to sports stars and Hollywood.

4. Lens Flare
We are seeing LESS stock art (thankfully) and more "real" photos and videos. Marketers are starting to realize sharing warts and all helps create authenticity and a sense of immediacy.

5. Human as Robot
Not sure this trend is happening any more or less than it already was.

6. Cameras we wear
I think Google Glass is sucking up much of this "wearable" trend at the moment, but  GoPro hasn't done badly (lol).

7. Multi-racial Models (was STRONG going into the year, stronger now).

8. World Cup
Was huge and America STILL doesn't get soccer :).

9. Witches and bye bye vampires (end of True Blood signals this trend is right on and about time).

10. Handcrafted Vectors
This is another "break down the perfection" trend and seeing it too (like the lens flare or nonperfect but more real photo).

11. Instagrammy FOODies - this is BLOWING UP almost as fast as "selfies".

12. Experiences over Things = Team Curagami (http://www.curagami.com ) is placing a HUGE bet on this one as we see the future of ecommerce being about the quality of interactions instead of their quantity.

13. Creative Collaboration - another one team Curagmai is betting on HUGE and we are seeing demand grow. Think about your life. I like to say I don't "passively consume anything" anymore. If I can't bend, shape and spin the content I go somewhere else. If the content isn't fascinating, cool and fun I go somewhere else. Curagami makes this "ambassador" interaction easy so your customers can advocate and share your brand.

TRIBES are the key going forward.

I would say IStock got way more RIGHT than wrong with their December design predictions. What do you think?

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Amanda Groover's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:43 PM

Marketing in this decade not only needs but REQUIRES the ability to think outside of the box!  Look at some of the trends appearing in a marketing campaign near you  in the next year!

Jakarta Web Developer's curator insight, August 11, 2:15 PM

Web and Graphic Design Trends 2014 – Infographic via istock (Midyear Check)

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, August 12, 12:06 PM

Interactive infographic:
http://www.istockphoto.com/article_view.php?ID=1619#.Uq1MuI0hZjF

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Contests Are KING - Web Design For Contests Example Inspires via @HomesDotCom

Contests Are KING - Web Design For Contests Example Inspires via @HomesDotCom | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Designing For Contests
I love home Homes.com doesn't kid around. They create CONTESTS not CONTENT. Why? Because contests have the added value of helping to create community too.

Erica Campbell Byrum How To Create Contests Video (start at 1:41)
http://sco.lt/6myquH VIDEO

Contest and games are FAVORITE engagement tactics because:

* They work (more new people come to play and share their playing).
* They are inexpensive WINNING is the main thing not the prizes.
* Contests have a LONG shelf life.
* Contests help unearth power Contributors and Social Supporters.


That last bullet speaks to the Gladwellian "Mavens, Salespeople and Connectors" tribes within your visitors. When you create a contest you will be visited by "contest trolls" and Ms. Byrum discusses how to deal with them in her video (link above).

This link is to Homes.com's Contest Page. This is a "Contest Splash" Page that shares the many simultaneous contests they run. I would add an ask for their "Blogger Ambassadors Program" too. They use contests to unearth their bloggers, but why not cut out the middle man and ask for those Ambassadors straight out?

Doesn't hurt to do both and I like have a page that explains the elite nature of our "buzz team". Don't think I'm saying Homes.com is missing it. They clearly GET the value of contests and you should STEAL the "ditch digging" design they do to "Splash Page" their contests.

Highly recommend watching Ms. Byrum too as her video is nothing if not comprehensive http://sco.lt/6myquH


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Design G+ In For The Win via @Curagami

Design G+ In For The Win via @Curagami | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Designing G+ In
Crazy to suggest using G+ as a tool to power your online marketing right? Maybe not. Greatest return always comes from the least understood ideas. GooglePlus is a "least understood" idea these days.

Their leader left and TechCrunch said G+ the social net is dead. They may be right, but that is beside the point. G+ has always been more than a social net. G+ is a suite of tools marketers can use to find blue oceans.

Blue oceans are the as yet unspoiled places where marketers can still swim without fear of a herd of sharks. Oceans where sharks eat themselves are "red oceans" such as Facebook.

We suggest designing G+ into your marketing and site. Hold weekly hangouts, you don't need a G+ profile to use hangouts now, and created a branded community if only so you rule your name in #seo. Finally we suggest curating the great comments you will receive on G+ as a source of future content.

We've never been able to figure out how to use circles in a unique way, but they too beckon with possibility. By creating weekly content based on Hangouts and Community you get lots of GoogleJuice, the least expensive #videomarketing we know about and great community development tools that cost you NOTHING.

The linked post discusses Mark Traphagen's call to use G+ as a hub of your marketing. That's a great call since the price is RIGHT (free though you may spend some making G+ play the way you want it in your design). Designing G+ tools INTO your community creates the cheapest, biggest and best online win we can think of.

So the death of G+ is greatly exaggerated and, if you are smart, you will find a way to design the tool's many possibilities into your marketing.

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Clean & Simple Website Design Trends In 2014

Clean & Simple Website Design Trends In 2014 | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
Like the World Wide Web itself, the world of website design is constantly in flux as technologies change and design standards evolve. What worked in 2013 may

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Worth revisiting some of these web design trends. What is the engine behind these trends? Social / Mobile web. Like the "winners" and "losers" organization here.

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Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, July 29, 11:59 AM

En el momento en que me lo estoy planteando

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Funky Webdesign Ideas [some great, some horrible]

Funky Webdesign Ideas [some great, some horrible] | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
If you spend enough time online, it's surprising how much most websites start to look alike. Sure, there are variations, but to a large extent, web design is

Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Wow, some cool web design ideas here and some HORRIBLE ones. I like Wolf & Badger: https://www.wolfandbadger.com/ Current site doesn't look like the FLASH example.

Never use Flash at this point as it kills SEO and its not "trending" in the right direction). Some of these ideas are a mess, but see which ones are your favorites. Always good to see where the line is. Some of these sites are well over the line.

New design isn't as funky, but it is solid. The idea of walking a customer into the middle of a strange fantasy seen and letting them find their links would not normally be something I would like since it obscures instead of makes clear.

The Online Shop (lower right) is what sold me on this fantasy. I also think we are in a time when sites are sites and so BORING. The Flash needed to be killed but check out the link to there new site and see if you don't still rock a good design.

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Top 10 Mistakes in Web Design

Top 10 Mistakes in Web Design | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

The 10 most egregious UX offenses against users. Web design disasters and HTML horrors are legion, though many usability atrocities are less common than they used to be.

Marty Note
If you took a day and fixed any of these Top 10 Web Design Mistakes That Apply you would make 50% more this holiday season. These are "cost of poker" fixes that can easily remain for years and years. Every year one of these mistakes exists your website is 10% less effective.

When you make 2 or more of these mistakes you pay with an order of magnitude more pain for each added mistake so 2 mistakes doesn't cost you 20%. No 2 mistakes cost you 200% of what your website could be doing for you.

Fix all 10 of these basic problems and your site is on its way to its "mission critical" place in your company.

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"Had Script, Needed WARRIORS" - 30 Lessons In Creativity via Jodorowsky's Dune

Greatest Film Never Made
"What is he purpose of life," the director Jodorowsky asks in this must view documentary film for any creative, "to create a soul". The amazing creativity and vision of El Topo's director is shared in a series of linked stories.

Much like any creative's mind, this film flies between the surreal, heroic, mystical and crazy. Stories about Orson Wells and Pink Floyd are rich in "sounds true" detail, but pales in comparison to the "I can't type that fast" advice shared.

Advice such as:

* Be all in.
* Be a prophet.

* When it comes to missions THINK BIG (something important for humanity).
* Start with clear ideas, but find and respect "light of genius".
* Challenge people to find their best.
* Give Morning Motivation speeches.
* Your VISION should become OUR IDEA.
* OUR Ideas become art.
* When you think you are looking at a rock its an object & vice versa.
* Lucky enough to meet a prophet FOLLOW HIM.
* Be supportive of others.

* Transport people. MOVE THEM.
* Look for and work with WARRIORS (life is too short for anything else).
* Imagine and then imagine again.
* No such thing as "too far".
* Let the work rule.
* One man's obsession is another man's art.
* MOTIVATE others.

* If you can Seduce Salvador Dali DO SO.
* Create enigmas.
* If chance puts Dali at your hotel, send him a strange note.
* When you find a clock in the sand discover who lost it.
* Create MOVEMENTS and ART with your life.
* If Dali asks you for a helicopter, GIVE IT TO HIM.
* Dali gets you Giger, Giger gets you Magma (and so on).
* If you can get a meeting with Mich Jagger, TAKE IT.
* If Andy Warhol invites to the FACTORY, go there.
* Plan everything, Plan Nothing (chance).
* When you see Orson Wells in a Paris restaurant, send wine.
* Live a EULOGY Life not a Resume Life.


That last bullet picks up on a great David Brooks TED Talk I wrote about on LinkedIn yesterday: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140717125545-13925622-are-you-living-a-resume-or-a-eulogy-life 


Hope you are living a Eulogy Life. Jodorowsky sure did. I had to be shoved kicking and screaming on the Eulogy train by the Big C. Glad I got on this train even if it turns out to be the last train from Clarksville :). M

Are you a "plural being"?



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