Design Revolution
Follow
Find tag "e-commerce"
50.2K views | +33 today
Design Revolution
Design Is Revolutionary
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

27 E-commerce Website Designs Scenttrail Hates & Why

27 E-commerce Website Designs Scenttrail Hates & Why | Design Revolution | Scoop.it

Marty (Scenttrail) Note: 27 Bad Ecommerce Designs
These CSS Design Award Winning sites illustrate why designers shouldn't be in charge of your commercial website. In a recent G+ post I shared our journey across time, place and money online (Why Time Is Money Online: https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/RdjAjWoJTHw ).

It's easy to get lost. We kept trying to make narrative, movie and book-like) logic work on our ecommerce site and it never did. To the extent we told stories we depressed conversions and we conducted these tests before the web was drowning in content.

Not that the web has been fully "content shocked" to within an inch of its life one of the FIRST jobs any ecommerce site must accomplish is loudly and clearly proclaiming their STORE-NESS.

These 27 "pretty picture" designs are find for big established brands people trust, but they would CRUSH a new commercial site. The "store-ness" is confusing. Are these content sites or can we buy stuff here.

Some communicate some "store-ness",but none have the "ditch digging" realities of large, successful ecom sites such as REI.com or Schwan's.com (highest converting ecom site in world). Call-To-Actions are missing (mostly), navigation is murky and not keyword dense and images don't you line of sight rules (viewers' eyes go where people's eyes in your images go).

Real ecommerce needs a few things to be successful that most of these sites ignore, miss or don't know such as:

* Email subscription forms (email list = your most profitable channel because YOU OWN IT, don't believe BS about email marketing being dead mobile is making email marketing different but dead =nope.
* AN OFFER - see REI.com's "daily deals" or Amazon's ability to sell any and everything.
* Great navigation balanced between seo and customer engagement.
* Images mapped to produce CLICKS where merchants want them.
* Every image, click and share creates analytics and data so part of what you need to map into an ecom design is WHAT DATA YOU NEED. Can't figure out what actionable thing I would know after a month's traffic on these designs.
* Sense of TIME and PLACE (what season are we in? Where are these sites?).
* TRUST and that comes from other people (testimonials, curation of User Generated Content and NONE of these have anything like that so unless they are major brands they won't pass the trust test with many shoppers).
* TRUST MARKS = didn't see a VISA or MC logo either. One way to create trust online is to align with brands and marks people already trust. Those badges look like ugly scars to designers and they help make merchants millions.
* Content - we love VISUAL MARKETING but some context such as the context one satisfied customer would share is a must.
* Design = Trust - we grant that these sites look amazing and looking amazing helps with creating trust, but junk 'em up a little and make more money.

That last bullet reminds me of a story from my P&G tenure. My boss Russ Mills taught me to never leave a display too neat. "People won't disturb a display that is too neat," he explained. These ecommerce designs are too neat for me (by half). If you aren't a major brand ignore every one of these 27 "inspirational" ecom web designs.

PS. Favorite has to be the example in the picture above. Not only do we chop people in half we ask visitors to kiss their behinds (lol). Opposite of the welcoming atmosphere I want to create on my ecom sites (lol) back when I was responsible for millions of online sales yearly. At my core I remain an online merchant, but I don't miss not sleeping and sweating sales numbers from now until Valentine's Day. Don't miss that at all :).


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

5 Common SEO Design Mistakes

5 Common SEO Design Mistakes | Design Revolution | Scoop.it
Martin (Marty) Smith's insight:

Website Design SEO Mistakes
It is easy to make unintended SEO mistakes during the design phase. Here are 5 common SEO mistakes to avoid during the design phase of your website.

5 Common SEO Mistakes During Design
1. Junk (JavaScript or too much code) In The Head.

2. Not using HTML5 or CSS3.

3. Tables not CSS.

4. Code doesn't W3C validate.

5. Not responsive & No Social Shares. 

 

Design is NOT a neutral act. Choices are being made daily that can and will impact a search engine spider's ability to understand how to categorize your information,

In a recent post about how Internet marketing isn't what you think it is (http://www.atlanticbt.com/blog/why-internet-marketing-isnt-what-you-think-it-is/) I discussed the importance of the "backend" or the behind the curtain elements that play such a major role in your website's success or failure.

The best designers understand that creating elegant beautiful pictures is only half the battle. If those pictures obstruct, delay or otherwise confuse search engine spiders all the good the design does with people can be undone.

Undone because if no one SEES your design its elegance can't be appreciated. This is why designers must understand basic SEO concepts such as keyword density and code efficiency.

As an Ecommerce Directors I encouraged our designer to use keywords in all things including file-naming conventions. Many designers will call files image3 or something equally nondescript. The file name may or may not play a role in SEO, but the discipline of using keywords is important.

It was rumored Steve Jobs wanted even the parts of his products that couldn't be seen looked great. Same concept here with file names. Naming image files with business intelligence makes it easier for those who follow behind AND the discipline reinforces the designer’s important role in SEO.


Avoid these common design SEO mistakes and your website will perform better.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
Scoop.it!

5 Things Amazon Can Teach Your Ecom Site For THIS Holiday

Amazon is becoming a bit of a hot mess as they add streaming and move from things to digital bits, but the big A still has lessons every Ecommerce vet can learn for this holiday including:

* BIG Buy Now Button On Plane with Product Picture.

* Institutionalize Free Shipping (i.e. Prime makes free shipping a loyalty program). 
* Customers Who Bought, Also Bought (great up-sale) on product page.

* Reviews & Review the Reviewer. 
* Social prominent but not overbearing. 

Big Buy Buttons
I like BIG buy buttons (see REI.com) with high contrast. I also like how Amazon puts their Buy button in what is normally a dead-end gutter (far right side of the page) on the same plane as their product headline. 

Free Shipping As Loyalty
Prime is more than Free Shipping. Prime members get free streaming movies and other benefits. Amazon prime may have started as "free shipping" but it is rapidly becoming Amazon's loyalty program as they institutionalize it more and more (brilliant and a #STEALTHIS). 

Up-Sale and Cross-Sale
I like that Amazon tried to sell you the product on the page AND something else. Many ecom sites pitch cross sale and that can get confusing. Customers have worked hard to get to THIS product page so why hit them with a lot of option that create dissonance. Better to say People who've purchased the product you are looking at also bought these other things. This is UP-SALE instead of CROSS-SALE (where you offer other similar items in the hope of making a sale on one of them). 

Cross-Sale is most effective on products where you can move customers from THEIR products to YOUR products or from low margin to higher margin. I'm not in love with this kind of cross-sale because it can be confusing and distracting. Amazon includes cross sale WAY down the page in their "continue shopping" suggestions. 

Review & Review the Reviewer
Most ecom websites have reviews, but few go the next easy step and ask for feedback on reviewers. A simple thumbs up or down on the reviews themselves can identify star reviewers. Writers fight to get on Amazon's review team more for the social kudos than the free books. Your "review team" should be a hotly competed for club too. 

Social (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest)
I would suggest those three social icons at the very least for any e-commerce website. You may also want to add LinkedIn (if you re B2B) or a tool/net like Scoop.it or Paper.li.  

more...
No comment yet.