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Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves

Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves | Design for Learning | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Practical examples of how content curation can be a powerful means of supporting inquiry-based learning.

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Audrey's curator insight, March 21, 2014 7:30 PM

Curating is about finding and selecting information in order to learn about a subject. Youngsters can be encouraged to do this  pre-school.  This motivational 21st century skill can be encouraged at home. with educational games toys and and books which stimulates interest.  For example children can learn about  science by interacting with Chemistry Lab; Horrible Science - explosive experiments; Newton's Cradle and Science Museum.  By the time they get to school they are already full of curiosity and ready to increase their knowledge.  Audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 30, 2014 9:27 AM

By Robin Good,

Here's a short first-hand report highlighting how an 8th grade social studies class teacher (Terri Inloes) has fully leveraged the content curation potential to let her students dive, discover and make sense of topics (in this case social reform movements) that they had not studied before. All by themselves.


Here the steps taken to make this happen:


a) By using the Question Formulation Technique, the teacher prepared pairs of photographs representing each of the reform movements, one picture dating back to the late 19th century, and another representing where that social reform movement stands in today’s society. 


b) After checking out all of the photos, students settled on the pair of pictures that most caught their interest.


c) They brainstormed and refined a set of specific questions, and then shared their thinking with the class. 

d) With the feedback received they selected the topic which they would curate. 

e) At this point students planned their research strategies. By using 5 different graphic organizers from the book Q Tasks, by Carol Koechlin and Sandi Zwaan, students were allowed to choose the one that they thought would help them the most in planning their keyword search strategies. 


f) Students were assigned WordPress blogs and provided basic instructions on how to use them to 

curate and publish their research work.


g) Discovery and real learning kicked in as students proceeded in collaborative groups to research and document their chosen topic. 


You can see some of the outcomes that this assignment produced right here:


General Conclusions

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/2014/02/24/conclusion-3/


Voting Rights Inequality

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/


Mental Health Treatment
http://tmsorangementalhealthcaretreatments.d20blogs.org/


Prohibition Acts

http://tmsorangeprohibitionacts.d20blogs.org/ 

 



A very inspiring example of content curation can be effectively applied in the classroom with impressive results. 


Highly recommended. 9/10


Thanks to Nancy White of Innovations in Education for participating, writing and reporting about it.

 Thanks to Robin Good for the fine summary in this insight.
The ideas here offer a great classroom challenge to students.{Monica}
Glenda Morris's curator insight, April 8, 2014 2:57 PM

Important 21st century skills

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You’re Asking the Wrong Question

You’re Asking the Wrong Question | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
You’re asking the wrong question. No, seriously, you’re probably asking the wrong question.

Yeah, that’s a pretty bold statement. But I've read tens of thousands of questions meant to prompt discussions in online course rooms, and the odds are I am right.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

A good reminder of the best use of discussion: to encourage peer interaction through asking questions that generate divergent responses. 

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How Course Web Design Impacts Student Engagement -- Campus Technology

How Course Web Design Impacts Student Engagement -- Campus Technology | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
When Instructure began analyzing the course designs for its higher ed customers, the LMS company discovered something about getting students to interact with the online elements of their courses.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

This article supports what we already know: supports what we implicitly know – course design with simple navigation and a deeper use of features seem to lead to better learning outcomes.

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5 Tips To Find Your Narrative Voice For Your eLearning Course - eLearning Industry

5 Tips To Find Your Narrative Voice For Your eLearning Course - eLearning Industry | Design for Learning | Scoop.it

Use these tips to find your eLearning narrative voice and fine tune your flow, so that your learners have the opportunity to maximize the benefits they can receive from your eLearning deliverable.

 
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

"Remember that you are a guide through their learning process". 

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Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students

Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Each student is unique and learns in different ways. There are many ways to use this diversity as a classroom strength.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:
Great infographic about how to personalize learning during curriculum design.
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Diversifying the Role Course Content Plays

Diversifying the Role Course Content Plays | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Peter Burkholder’s recently published piece in The History Teacher (highlighted in the October issue of The Teaching Professor) is another reminder of how much we need a different way of thinking about course content.

We all pretty much agree that we try to cover too much material in our courses, programs, and majors, but the thought of leaving things out often causes personal and profession anguish. We argue with ourselves that a certain piece of content is too important to cut, and our students need to know the information to pass certifying exams and to get jobs. Then there are departmental expectations. Most courses establish knowledge bases for subsequent courses. Our colleagues are depending on us. We further complicate matters by making course and instructor reputations a function of content quantity. A decrease in the amount covered means lower standards and a dilution of the intellectual currency of the course. Bottom line: We know we’ve got a problem, but these realities and our thinking have us backed into a corner.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

"What would you have the student remember from your course? That perspective makes it easier to envision a larger role for content in a course."

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Improve Accessibility in Tomorrow’s Online Courses by Leveraging Yesterday’s Techniques

Improve Accessibility in Tomorrow’s Online Courses by Leveraging Yesterday’s Techniques | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Traditionally, when a face-to-face student requested a sign language interpreter or other assistance, individualized accommodation arrangements were made through institutional channels.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:
A succinct summary of key accessibility considerations for development of online learning.
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Blogging as a Curation Platform

Blogging as a Curation Platform | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
I have written about curation before using Twitter as a Curation Tool and about the importance of helping our Students Becoming Curators of Information.  Sue Waters also just published a very compr...
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

A good graphical diagram of a "blogger' as curator" workflow. Also, reviews the difference between curators and collectors. 

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Hands-On: Creating Branching Scenarios - E-Learning Heroes

Hands-On: Creating Branching Scenarios - E-Learning Heroes | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
E-Learning Heroes: Step-by-step tutorials for building better courses, fast answers to your e-learning questions, free downloads for your e-learning projects.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

This post goes back to 2010. However, it's a good introduction to the basics of setting up branching scenarios.

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SweetRush | Designing for a New Generation of E-Learning. Designer’s Survival Guide: Top 10 Tips

SweetRush | Designing for a New Generation of E-Learning. Designer’s Survival Guide: Top 10 Tips | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Classic design tips that are especially important in an age of information overload. "Simplify  simplify simplify" is the mantra of the digital content age.

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3 Steps for Creating Effective Learning Objectives – INFOGRAPHIC

3 Steps for Creating Effective Learning Objectives – INFOGRAPHIC | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Learning objectives describe what the learner will know, or be able to do. Here is an infographic on steps to create effective learning objectives.Read more ›

Via David Vellut, Darius Dela Cruz
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4 Design Lessons That Every eLearning Professional Must Learn

4 Design Lessons That Every eLearning Professional Must Learn | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
You don’t consider yourself as an expert on design. But you do treat design as a crucial aspect of eLearning. Here're 4 lessons you should learn.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

"...your goal as an eLearning designer is to make them come back and finish the course. Every design element, from font sizes to images, should reflect such goal."

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How Good Teachers Carefully Decenter Themselves

How Good Teachers Carefully Decenter Themselves | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
How Good Teachers Carefully Decenter Themselves
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

I like where this article places teachers within the scheme of learning -- they are one element in its design.

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Why Brain-Based Learning Means Always Connecting Old Knowledge With New

Why Brain-Based Learning Means Always Connecting Old Knowledge With New | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Why Brain-Based Learning Means Always Connecting Old Knowledge With New
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

The power of "synthesis: combining ideas to form a new whole".

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The 5 Pillars of Interaction Design

The 5 Pillars of Interaction Design | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
The five key aspects of good interaction design and how to incorporate them into your website.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

"Interaction design isn’t about how interfaces behave, it’s about adapting technology based on how people behave. " Same goes for learning design.

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Using Context to Deepen and Lengthen Learning

Using Context to Deepen and Lengthen Learning | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Nearly every teacher has experienced students forgetting something important. This forgetfulness comes in various forms. It might involve not following instructions for an assignment, missing a due date, forgetting important details on a test, or even forgetting to take the test itself. Whatever the memory infraction, there are usually good reasons why students forget. Gratefully, there are a few simple ways teachers can build context to help students achieve deeper and longer lasting learning.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Front-loaded and whole-task context as key design features that support active learning. 

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Introducing the ASU Instructional Designers [Infographic] - TeachOnline

Introducing the ASU Instructional Designers [Infographic] - TeachOnline | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
About 40 staff members at Arizona State University have the words Instructional Design or Instructional Designer in their job title. Even though there are a lot of them about (and some have been at ASU for quite a long time), for many of us, the full range of what Instructional Designers do may be unknown. …
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Seven Mistakes to Avoid When Writing Multiple-Choice Questions

Seven Mistakes to Avoid When Writing Multiple-Choice Questions | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
The goal of any well-constructed test is to test students’ expertise on a topic and not their test-taking skills. We need to eliminate as many flaws in our questions as we can to “provide a level playing field for testwise and not-so-testwise students. The probability of answering a question correctly should relate to an examinee's expertise on the topic and should not relate to their expertise on test-taking strategies.” (NMBE, 2001, p 19)
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Test students on their knowledge -- not their test-taking skills.

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Recasting Teachers and Students as Designers

Recasting Teachers and Students as Designers | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
By Melanie Kahl Designers are privileged to work within a fascinating collision of fields at a time when the conversation could not be more pertinent. The in
Louisa Lambregts's insight:
Learning as a design experience.
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7 Memory Skills That Will Make You Way Smarter

7 Memory Skills That Will Make You Way Smarter | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Spoiler alert: it's not cramming.
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Learning tips from the book "Make It Stick: The Science Of Successful Learning." by by Peter C. Brown  (Author), Henry L. Roediger III (Author), Mark A. McDaniel .

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Free eBook - How Gamification Reshapes Learning

Free eBook - How Gamification Reshapes Learning | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
The Learning Professionals Free Gamification eBook. Would you be interested in the Most Effective Uses of Gamification in Learning?
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

A series of articles from various elearning professionals regarding when gamification works the best.

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Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves

Content Curation: How To Help Students Learn, Discover and Make Sense of New Topics All By Themselves | Design for Learning | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Practical examples of how content curation can be a powerful means of supporting inquiry-based learning.

more...
Audrey's curator insight, March 21, 2014 7:30 PM

Curating is about finding and selecting information in order to learn about a subject. Youngsters can be encouraged to do this  pre-school.  This motivational 21st century skill can be encouraged at home. with educational games toys and and books which stimulates interest.  For example children can learn about  science by interacting with Chemistry Lab; Horrible Science - explosive experiments; Newton's Cradle and Science Museum.  By the time they get to school they are already full of curiosity and ready to increase their knowledge.  Audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 30, 2014 9:27 AM

By Robin Good,

Here's a short first-hand report highlighting how an 8th grade social studies class teacher (Terri Inloes) has fully leveraged the content curation potential to let her students dive, discover and make sense of topics (in this case social reform movements) that they had not studied before. All by themselves.


Here the steps taken to make this happen:


a) By using the Question Formulation Technique, the teacher prepared pairs of photographs representing each of the reform movements, one picture dating back to the late 19th century, and another representing where that social reform movement stands in today’s society. 


b) After checking out all of the photos, students settled on the pair of pictures that most caught their interest.


c) They brainstormed and refined a set of specific questions, and then shared their thinking with the class. 

d) With the feedback received they selected the topic which they would curate. 

e) At this point students planned their research strategies. By using 5 different graphic organizers from the book Q Tasks, by Carol Koechlin and Sandi Zwaan, students were allowed to choose the one that they thought would help them the most in planning their keyword search strategies. 


f) Students were assigned WordPress blogs and provided basic instructions on how to use them to 

curate and publish their research work.


g) Discovery and real learning kicked in as students proceeded in collaborative groups to research and document their chosen topic. 


You can see some of the outcomes that this assignment produced right here:


General Conclusions

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/2014/02/24/conclusion-3/


Voting Rights Inequality

http://tmsredvotingrights.d20blogs.org/


Mental Health Treatment
http://tmsorangementalhealthcaretreatments.d20blogs.org/


Prohibition Acts

http://tmsorangeprohibitionacts.d20blogs.org/ 

 



A very inspiring example of content curation can be effectively applied in the classroom with impressive results. 


Highly recommended. 9/10


Thanks to Nancy White of Innovations in Education for participating, writing and reporting about it.

 Thanks to Robin Good for the fine summary in this insight.
The ideas here offer a great classroom challenge to students.{Monica}
Glenda Morris's curator insight, April 8, 2014 2:57 PM

Important 21st century skills

Rescooped by Louisa Lambregts from Path to becoming a Learning Warrior
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Successful eLearning Starts with Six Key Attitudes

Successful eLearning Starts with Six Key Attitudes | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Keep your eLearning courses student-centered by honoring the six key learner attitudes that will lead to success.

Via David Vellut, Darius Dela Cruz
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

Good principles that apply to all learning modes.

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The Non-Designers Guide To Building an eLearning Course

The Non-Designers Guide To Building an eLearning Course | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
Are you willing to create an eLearning course on your own? Here is an indispensable guide to the basics of creating DIY topnotch courses.
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Rescooped by Louisa Lambregts from Best Practices in Instructional Design & Use of Learning Technologies
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20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning

20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning | Design for Learning | Scoop.it
20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning Recently we took at look at the phases of inquiry-based learning through a framework, and even apps that were conducive to inquiry-based learning on the iPad.

Via JoelleYalin
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Gagne's 9 Events of Instruction

Gagne's 9 Events of Instruction | Design for Learning | Scoop.it

You are probably familiar with Bloom’s Taxonomy, but how about Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction? Robert Gagne is considered the father of instructional design, and he laid out the 9 Events in his book, The Conditions of Learning (1965). Like Bloom’s Taxonomy, Gagne’s 9 Events are a great tool in the development of instruction.


Via learning designer
Louisa Lambregts's insight:

An oldie but goodie!

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learning designer's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:44 AM

Additional chart available at site.