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A Farming Kindergarten in Vietnam with a Spiraling Green Roof

A Farming Kindergarten in Vietnam with a Spiraling Green Roof | Fransoix's Musings - Les intérêts de Fransoix | Scoop.it

In Dongnai, Vietnam, Vo Trong Nghia Architects has completed the construction of ‘farming kindergarten’, a large pre-school designed to accommodate up to 500 children. The project is envisioned as a model of sustainability set within the tropical climate, allowing the school’s young inhabitants to understand the importance of sustainable education and design.

A fully accessible green roof drawn in a triple-ring-shape creates three courtyards enclosed by the looping structure, providing safe and secure playgrounds for the kindergarten’s occupants. The different levels and gradients created by the building’s spiral form offer a series of distinct outdoor learning environments, where children are able to forge a close relationship with the natural world.

 

More images and information at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, May 5, 2014 6:14 PM

Patios ajardinados en una cubierta con distintos niveles para el recreo de los niños.

Ati Energia's curator insight, May 6, 2014 10:30 AM

Sustainability in Vietnam and educating children at the kinder garden level. 

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WELCOME TO SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE + GREEN BUILDING

WELCOME TO SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE + GREEN BUILDING | Fransoix's Musings - Les intérêts de Fransoix | Scoop.it

A daily update of current technologies, case studies, events, projects and fascinating sustainable design strategies being implemented across the globe...


Related topics include: green streets and green infographics.

 

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jean's curator insight, January 12, 2014 6:15 PM

szszdedefrefrf

Entreprise Peinture Deco's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:51 AM

Bienvenue chez Entreprise Peinture Déco, Plus de 20 ans d'expérience
Devis Travaux-Peintures-Peinture Renovation,Habitat 91,77,75,78 ...
www.entreprisepeinturedeco.fr/devis-travaux/
Devis Travaux peinture renovation- Epinay-sous-Sénart 91860- Epinay-sur-Orge 91360-Etiolles 91450-Etréchy 91580-Fleury-Mérogis 91700.

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, June 10, 2015 2:18 PM

green clean

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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | Fransoix's Musings - Les intérêts de Fransoix | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.


A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”


Via Lauren Moss
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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.