Studium Media - Musings
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What if we could rebuild New York City?

What if we could rebuild New York City? | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it
New York has become one of the world’s most populous, densely packed cities. What if you could redraw the city’s map – and build it from scratch?

 

If we were designing New York today, how different would it look?

The new New York City would balance the relationship between the information networks that the metropolis depends on and Earth’s finite resources.

All vital components of life would be monitored and attuned to the needs of every organism, not just humans. Supplies of food and water, our energy and waste and even our air would be sensibly scrutinised. Thanks to masses of miniaturised low-cost electronic components deployed across the city, communication becomes far easier. New York will grow and adapt to millions of new minds entering it everyday.

The city would make sure every need is provided for within its borders. How we provide nutrients, transports, and shelter would be updated. Dilapidated buildings would be replaced with vertical agriculture and new kinds of housing would join cleaner, greener ways to get around the city. What were once streets become snaking arteries of livable spaces, embedded with renewable energy sources, low-tech, green vehicles for mobility and productive nutrient zones. The former street grid could provide the foundation for new flexible networks. By reengineering the obsolete streets, we can create robust and ecologically active pathways.

While all this may sound optimistic, some of this city of tomorrow is already taking shape...


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 18, 2014 2:36 PM

What a great academic exercise!  The question is really applicable to all new cities and city undergoing renovation.  More mixed use, greener, better transport systems, more shared everything and more self-sufficient describe the plan.

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Designing The Innovation Economy: Using Technology To Shape The Future City

Designing The Innovation Economy: Using Technology To Shape The Future City | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it
With technological change marching forward at a rapid clip, city environments are being reshaped and the urban experience is being reimagined.

Nearly ubiquitous mobile access has provided visitors and residents with the ability to unlock the “secrets” of the city, opening the door to new experiences and improving livability and user-friendliness. However, in order to make the best of these changes, policy must welcome and support innovation and the urban transformation that accompanies it—and there’s no one-size-fits-all formula...


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6 Examples of Urban Gardens, from Paris to Mexico City

6 Examples of Urban Gardens, from Paris to Mexico City | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it

In honor of the opening of a new garden in Paris, Reuters has pulled together a list of some of their favorite green spaces.

Here are a couple favorites...


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9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities

9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it

Many cities are coming to the realization that creating a smart and sustainable city means ultimately attaining a high level of economic efficiency, a high quality of life, a highly desirable place in which to live and do business, and a meaningful commitment to environmental responsibility.

But what really makes for a green or sustainable city?  And how can sometimes highly diverse urban areas attain it?


LEED buildings and even LEED neighborhoods are surely a good thing, but they are not a sufficient thing to declare a municipality sustainable.  This is an overview of the essential elements (there are many more, but these are the most basic):

Committing to greenBuilding greenBuying greenPowering greenConserving nearby (and creating internal) green landscapesProtecting green:  both water quality and water quantityLocating green:  creating a compact, walkable, interconnected, mixed-use communityMoving green:  diversifying transportation and increasing accessibility(Not) wasting green:  getting to zero on the production of waste

 

Read the complete article for more on the green elements listed above...


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Noor Fatima's curator insight, April 12, 2013 1:05 PM

Exactly :)

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, April 12, 2013 7:12 PM

100% Green is not fooling around.

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Bass and Flinders Gateway: A Proposed Development Encouraging Community in New South Wales

Bass and Flinders Gateway: A Proposed Development Encouraging Community in New South Wales | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it

The Bass and Flinders Gateway development in New South Wales, Australia sits at the threshold of Wollongong and the greater Illawarra region, with the Illawarra Escarpment as the backdrop and inspiration behind the design concept- an aesthetic and metaphoric link to the building’s central location at the heart of the coastal plain between the mountain and sea, resonating the energy and history of the city.


To manage the transition between the city center and its outskirts, the profile of the buildings vary, layered as the topography of the escarpment, fine-tuned to moderate between the scales of the city, the domestic to the civic, the shed to the office tower. 
At the heart of the development is a central green space, permeable to cyclists and pedestrians, importantly connected into the Wollongong city grain and its local precinct. Designed to encourage social interaction and foster a sense of community that works positively with the developing urban plan and commercial strategy of the city rather than in competition it. 


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Raymond Versteegh's curator insight, December 25, 2013 8:44 AM

Love The Design And Intention --- out there in South Wales, Australia

Norm Miller's curator insight, January 1, 2014 4:32 PM

City planning matters and yet it is so often weighed down by naive resident concerns, NIMBY types and policitians.  

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The Closest Look Yet at the Relative Energy Efficiency of Big Buildings

The Closest Look Yet at the Relative Energy Efficiency of Big Buildings | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it

New York City's largest buildings have as outsized a place in the city's energy use profile as they do in the skyline. Just 2% of New York's properties account for 48% of the city's energy use. 

What's a city to do? The Bloomberg administration is doing what it does best: crunching massive amounts of data. On Wednesday, the mayor released the city's second annual benchmarking report, which analyzes the year-to-year energy and water use of New York's 26,680 largest buildings. 

"It's the first time we've had access to this comparative information," says Melissa Wright, an associate director of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s City Energy Project who has worked in the Bloomberg administration. "For so long it was this hidden information about what the real energy performance was of a set of buildings or individual buildings."

Visit the link for more...


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9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities

9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it

Many cities are coming to the realization that creating a smart and sustainable city means ultimately attaining a high level of economic efficiency, a high quality of life, a highly desirable place in which to live and do business, and a meaningful commitment to environmental responsibility.

But what really makes for a green or sustainable city?  And how can sometimes highly diverse urban areas attain it?


LEED buildings and even LEED neighborhoods are surely a good thing, but they are not a sufficient thing to declare a municipality sustainable.  This is an overview of the essential elements (there are many more, but these are the most basic):

Committing to greenBuilding greenBuying greenPowering greenConserving nearby (and creating internal) green landscapesProtecting green:  both water quality and water quantityLocating green:  creating a compact, walkable, interconnected, mixed-use communityMoving green:  diversifying transportation and increasing accessibility(Not) wasting green:  getting to zero on the production of waste

 

Read the complete article for more on the green elements listed above...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Noor Fatima's curator insight, April 12, 2013 1:05 PM

Exactly :)

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, April 12, 2013 7:12 PM

100% Green is not fooling around.

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Sky-high horticulture: Shenzhen's 'farmscraper' plan

Sky-high horticulture:  Shenzhen's 'farmscraper' plan | Studium Media - Musings | Scoop.it

Conceived in response to a densely populated Chinese city's unchecked growth, Asian Cairns is an ambitious take on vertical farming.

 

A Belgian architect recently unveiled the 79-acre masterplan for Asian Cairns, a dizzying new vision of urban vertical farming in China. Consisting of a sextet of “sustainable monoliths for rural urbanity” — stacked, pebble-esque, steel-ringed transparent pods that are powered by both vertical wind turbines and photovoltaics — Vincent Callebaut Architects’ Asian Cairns is planned for the rapidly swelling, skyscraper-heavy port city of Shenzhen in the southern province of Guangdong north of Hong Kong.Beyond agricultural concerns, Asian Cairns is envisioned as a mixed-use development that also incorporates residential, retail, and recreational areas. Imagined as being completely emissions-free and producing more energy than they consume, the Cairns were conceived in direct response to Shenzhen’s unchecked urban development and the population growth and increased pollution levels that have accompanied it...
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Duane Craig's curator insight, March 15, 2013 12:00 PM

Really cool, but I bet it will be a real challenge and expense to build it. Look at all the curved glass.

ParadigmGallery's curator insight, March 19, 2013 1:08 PM

TY Lauren Moss...