Derek's A Midsummer Night's Dream
336 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Derek Kruzan
Scoop.it!

"This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

"This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Derek's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Derek Kruzan's insight:

Some people might think it’s completely obvious that Puck serves as a trickster in Shakespeare’s A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream. On the other hand Robert C. Evans points out in his literary criticism, “This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled”: Puck as a Trickster in Shakespeare’s A Mid-summer Night’s Dream, the assumption that Puck is a trickster shouldn’t be taken so lightly. Many scholars believe there are several traits that make a literary trickster, and different scholars have different ideas on what traits they have. Rather than just assuming Puck is a trickster, Evans provides an argument that actually supports the fact that he is a trickster by comparing his behaviors to some traits of tricksters that many top literary scholars hold in common. Evans’ argument is well supported through the entire essay, as he makes direct references to both A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream and other literary scholars’ papers. It is with these examples of traits that he proves that Puck conforms with the role of other literary tricksters. He takes an argument that many people “have assumed had been too frequently or too extensively discussed to merit any further examination” and provides new, unique, and insightful information that gives the reader a better understanding of Pucks role in not only A Mid-summer Night’s Dream but also is role in the world of literature.

Evans, Robert. “This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled”: Puck as a Trickster in Shakespeare’s A Mid-summer Night’s Dream. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom’s Literary Reference Online. Facts on File, Inc. Web. <http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin= BLTTR010&SingleRecord=True.>

more...
Austin Berard's comment, March 10, 2013 6:28 PM
I had the same literary criticism and was wondering if you found it difficult to interpret and understand?
Brian Rowe's comment, March 10, 2013 8:32 PM
Wow! I am really impressed with this article! The authors views on Puck really make me think of his role in the play. What were your views on Puck throughout the play?
Scooped by Derek Kruzan
Scoop.it!

EBSCOhost: The Book of Theseus

EBSCOhost: The Book of Theseus | Derek's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Derek Kruzan's insight:

The plot of A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream, unlike some of Shakespeare’s other works is more original than it is based on other stories. Romeo and Juliet, for example, is almost entirely similar to the Ovid’s story of Pyramus and Thisbe. However, the plot of A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream doesn’t have a clear, plot-defining source but is rather a creation of Shakespeare. None the less, in this particular play there are several historical sources that Shakespeare does draw upon, one of which being the Greek myth surrounding the hero Theseus. This source is a synopsis of the interpretation of this myth by the Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) in his book The Book of Theseus. Boccaccio’s account of this myth explains a large portion of the life of Theseus (much more than is included in A Mid-Summer Nights Dream), including his relationship with Hypolota. Shakespeare doesn’t bother with Theseus’s adventures but he does touch upon his marriage with Hypolata and how he did conquer the Amazons. From there he transforms their relationship and Theseus’s love life into something entirely new by adding in their extra-marital affairs with fairies and creating perhaps the most confusing love octagon know to literature.

 

Cottrell, Alan. "The Book Of Theseus." Masterplots, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-4. Literary Reference Center. Web. 11 Feb. 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Kruzan
Scoop.it!

EBSCOhost: This One Is for the Groundlings

EBSCOhost: This One Is for the Groundlings | Derek's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Derek Kruzan's insight:

When reading Shakespeare many students have a hard time getting past the time gap between Shakespeare's life and their own. There are many aspects of Shakespeare's works that give the modern student a rough time getting into Shakespeare, including the type of English used and the vocabulary. However, as Cameron Hunt McNabb explains in his article This one is for the Groundlings, the messages in Shakespearean works and the idea of Shakespearean theater in the 1500's are still relevant today. McNabb, a college professor, wrote this article as a tool from one teacher to another, explaining one of many approaches to teaching Shakespeare; this one with a focus on making modern connections. Although the article doesn't contain any specific connections to A Mid-summer Night's Dream the ideas of modern relevance expressed in the article can certainly help a student reading the play undesrtadn the modern connections and relevance of A Mid-summer Night's Dream or any other work of Shakespeare for that matter.

 

McNabb, Cameron Hunt. "This One Is For The Groundlings." Pedagogy 11.2 (2011): 404-408.Academic Search Elite. Web. 3 Feb. 2013.

more...
Morgan Walsh's comment, March 10, 2013 6:55 PM
After reading this article, do you feel that you now have an easier time interperting Shakespeare's plays? Do you recommend it to others having a hard time with the topic of Shakespeare?
Derek Kruzan's comment, March 10, 2013 8:11 PM
This article did help interpret Shakespeare's plays or at least help interpret how Shakespeare is trying to entertain the audience, I would recommend this if you were having a hard time understanding the relevance of the play not necessarily understanding the language of Shakespeare.
Lana Delasanta's comment, March 11, 2013 12:10 AM
I really like how you took what we had already learned in class and kind of took it upon yourself to look into things similar to "the groundling approach" because I really liked that interpretation! -Lana
Scooped by Derek Kruzan
Scoop.it!

Puck and Fairies, from "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Puck and Fairies, from "A Midsummer Night's Dream" | Derek's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
View and learn about by on The Google Art Project
Derek Kruzan's insight:

Over history fairies have been viewed different ways and have been associated with various personalities, and as a result someone from the present might have an entirely different view of a fairy than the one Shakespeare had in mind when writing A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream. Joseph Paton’s interpretation of Shakespeare’s idea of fairies in his painting Puck and Fairies, from "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (1850), is probably one very closely represents Shakespeare’s ideas. The popular belief of Shakespeare’s time as evident by A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream, was that fairies were tricksters, not exactly the innocent little fairies like Tinkerbelle. Paton does an excellent job of capturing this mischievous, ridiculous, appearance of the fairies in his painting in several methods in his painting, including their facial expressions which are pretty strange and funny. The actions of their fairies, such as the playing of different instruments, also show the fun that Shakespeare portrays the fairies to have throughout A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream. Joseph Paton’s painting is a great tool for establishing a view about fairies similar to Shakespeare’s rather than the modern view which consists of fairies like Cosmo and Wanda from The Fairly Odd Parents.

 

Paton, Joseph N. Puck and Fairies, from "A Midsummer Night's Dream" 1850. Yale Center for British Art, Bay E, 408. The Google Art Project. Google. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. <http://www.googleartproject.com/collection/yale-center-for-british-art/artwork/puck-and-fairies-from-a-midsummer-nights-dream-joseph-noel-paton/2357496/#>.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Derek Kruzan
Scoop.it!

Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream

The Warners' unique interpretation of Shakespeare, complete with Batman and Robin.
Derek Kruzan's insight:

Shakespeare’s works have inspired many modern parodies and modern interpretations, and it’s no surprise that the famous Animaniacs cartoon created a few of their own parodies of Shakespeare. This short 2 minute film, is a modern translation of the final speech of A Mid-Summer Nights Dream by Puck with a slight humorous spin. The characters involved walk through this final speech while translating it into their own modern interpretations, while other character’s act out various scenes of the play with a comedic, exaggerated style. This parody not only helps understand the lines on the play but also the timeless qualities of Shakespearean literature. By translating the text and adding a little modern humor, like the Animaniacs did, any student can get a better understanding of A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream.

 

"Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream." YouTube. YouTube, 28 May 2010. Web. 11 Feb. 2013.

 

more...
Marat's comment, March 9, 2013 10:20 AM
How challenging was it to inetpret this video?
Jack Lanoie's comment, March 10, 2013 10:35 PM
I really like this video, even though it was used a lot. I think it puts a very fun spin on Shakespeare. Usually when you see or read a piece of his work it can be very difficult to find funny the first time, so the more modern interpretation really helps make it enjoyable the first time through.