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First map of how the brain organizes objects and actions we see (video) - Neurogadget.com

First map of how the brain organizes objects and actions we see (video) - Neurogadget.com | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Scientists at UC, Berkeley, have found that the brain is wired to put in order all the categories of objects and actions that we see. They have created the first map of how the brain organizes these groupings.

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Myth and Creativity: Stepping onto Platform 9 3/4

Myth and Creativity: Stepping onto Platform 9 3/4 | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
What do the Aboriginal Dreamtime and Platform 9 3/4 from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels have in common? Each one requires a sideways step into another world; a world of myth and creativity.
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The Good News of Art according to Jerzy Grotowski | Hold It All

The Good News of Art according to Jerzy Grotowski | Hold It All | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Thanks to Magan Wiles, who shared this with me at Amy's Corner Bakeshop this morning... Why do we sacrifice so much energy to our art? Not in order to teach others but to learn with them what our existence, our organism, ...
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Intervention – Encountering Paratheatrical Space by Andy Merrifield ...

Intervention – Encountering Paratheatrical Space by Andy Merrifield ... | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
When released in that heady year of 1968, Grotowski's book Towards a Poor Theatre immediately assumed Biblical authority for avant-garde theatrical practitioners, for actors as well as directors, for stage designers as well as ...
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The Hollywood Reporter's Actors Roundtable: The Trials and ...

The Hollywood Reporter's Actors Roundtable: The Trials and ... | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
The Hollywood Reporter kicked off its annual awards season Actors Roundtable with Matthew McConaughey, Jake Gyllenhaal, Forest Whitaker, Jared Leto, Josh Brolin and Michael B. Jordan. The star-studded panel featured ...
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Carl Jung on the Animus

Carl Jung on the Animus | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Animus is the archetype of reason and spirit in women. This is the male aspect of the female psyche, as the anima is the female aspect of male psyche.

 

This archetype is projected in various male images and characters like great artists, heroes, warriors, sportsmen, philosopher, and so forth. When identified with the animus (animus-inflated), women develop an excessive rational drive which may end up in excessive criticism and stubbornness.

 

In animus-inflated women with strong interest in intellectual matters we find the need to impose and maintain a... (click title for more)


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Holding the Opposites, Grounding in Earth to Cope with Difficult Times

Holding the Opposites, Grounding in Earth to Cope with Difficult Times | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

When we are not grounded, not connected to our roots, terrible psychic issues occur, which lead to feelings of intense fear and anxiety suggests Jungian analyst Judith Harris, in her book Jung and Yoga: The Psyche Body Connection. She quotes C. G. Jung, who, in his complex work, Mysterium Coniunctionus, establishes that the element of earth holds the exact central point between the tensions of two opposites.

 

Grounding oneself in the earth results in feeling held by the Great Mother, rendering one nourished, nurtured, and whole. The center is the eternal, Harris states, and all that is contained within it is represented by the archetype of the Self, which contains the totality of the psyche. The center implies stillness, and in the stillness there is space for something new to emerge. When we connect to the sacred center, the earth, “the deep-seated origins that existed thousands of years before us brings healing at a profound mystical level” (Harris, p. 76).

 

“He who is rooted in the soil endures,” wrote Jung (1927). “Alienation from the unconscious... (click title for more)


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Carl Jung: the child and the Golden Egg

Carl Jung: the child and the Golden Egg | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
"The phenomenology of the "child's" birth always points back to an original psychological state of non-recognition, i.e., of darkness or twilight, of non-differentiation between subject and object,...

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:01 PM

The original image for "participation mystique"...the undifferentiated state of bliss in the womb and in the "garden of eden" where all is innocence and where is all is possibility.

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Some Archetypes from C.G. Jung

Some Archetypes from C.G. Jung | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Jung Dream Interpretation is based on the Carl Jung theory of the collective unconscious. Jung provided description of seven separate characters and themes commonly occurring in dreams.

 

The main Carl Jung theory that his dream interpretation was built on, was that of the "collective unconscious." Jung believed this to be a collection of symbols that were shared by every human being but retained at the unconscious level. The symbols of the collective unconscious are provided to humans via the process of dreaming across generations and cultures.

Jung provided description of seven separate characters and themes commonly occurring in dreams throughout time as being major central to the collective unconscious:

 

The Seven Characters

 

1. The Persona – This archetype is symbolic of the dreamer whilst in dream mode. In other words, a projection...


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The New Jung Scholarship: Shot in the Dark? Or a Genuine Renaissance? | The New Existentialists

The New Jung Scholarship: Shot in the Dark? Or a Genuine Renaissance? | The New Existentialists | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

One doubts that the Collected Works of Carl Jung have ever been on display at a book exhibit during the annual meetings of the American Psychological Association, while Freud’s books have always and still continue to appear all over the place in that venue. We may attribute this to the failure of reductionistic laboratory empiricism in its entire history to grasp the reality of the unconscious, Freud being as much as they reluctantly have been abe to take.

 

Times may be changing, however. PsyCritiques, the weekly on-line APA journal of book reviews in psychology, has been inviting APA members to review books on Jung and his ideas with greater frequency.  My last book review for them was a critique of John Dourley’s Jung and the Religious Question, an in-depth look at Jung’s take on the role of spiritual experience in the process of individuation.

 

Dourley is an ordained priest and also a practicing Jungian analyst. Recently, they have asked me to review John Ryan Haule’s Jung for the Twenty-First century, a two-volume study. Volume one is a thoroughly original interpretation of Jung’s psychology in the context of modern developments in brain science, anthropology,  sociology, and biology. Volume two is a review of scientific studies on shamanism, meditation, and parapsychology, showing the relevance of Jung’s work for what lies at the borderline of mainstream science.

 

One can only conjecture as to the change in attitude...


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C.G. Jung: His Role in Depth Psychology

C.G. Jung: His Role in Depth Psychology | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The theories of Swiss-born Carl Gustav Jung (known as C.G. to his peers) developed during the infancy of the emerging field known as psychology, established him as a pioneer and one of the founding fathers of depth psychology. The broader field of psychology was essentially born in 1879 when German physician and philosopher, Wilhelm Wundt, set up the first laboratory that carried out psychological research.

The next few years marked the award of the first doctorate in psychology, the first title “professor of psychology, and the establishment of the American Psychological Association in 1892 (Zimbardo, 2001). In 1890, American philosopher William James, published Principles of Psychology, which marked an important transition from a mentalphilosophy to a scientific psychology. A few years later, in 1896, a Viennese medical doctor trained in neurology, Sigmund Freud, introduced the term “psychoanalysis” to define the practice of “talk therapy.”

In 1900, the same year that Jung graduated from the University of Basel with his M.D. degree, Freud published his groundbreaking work, The Interpretation of Dreams...


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Being Jungian in Today's World

Being Jungian in Today's World | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

When a local editor recently asked to write something about Jungian psychology, she opined that Jungian thought had become popular in various segments of our community, but notably not among psychologists. I had to agree with her. Best-selling books Care of the Soul and Women Who Run with the Wolves are both based on Jung's work, and Jungian analysts Robert Moore and James Hillman have been key figures in the men's movement.

 

I encounter Jungian terms in popular songs, movies, literature, and comic strips all the time. Even Madison Avenue has incorporated Jung. In one commercial, a beer-drinker joked that appreciation of Budweiser s finer qualities is stored in the collective unconscious. Nevertheless, I continue to hear the same story from university students: Jung is barely mentioned in most psychology departments...


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While Jung is neglected in psychology departments, he is vital for artists.  Whether his writings pass the limited view of psychology, they are an essential touchstone for artists of all kind because they attempt to merge the mundane with the luminous.

 

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Depth Psychology and Giftedness: Bringing Soul to the Field of Talent Development and Giftedness

Depth Psychology and Giftedness: Bringing Soul to the Field of Talent Development and Giftedness | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

When we as educators seek to educate with soul in mind, a radical spark is struck. Hillman (1983) pointed out “by definition, education must lead out” (p. 179). He suggested that educators lead the child out by leading the child in, by focusing on the imagination in the child’s fantasies. He urges the education of the imagination.

 

Hillman (1975), in Re-visioning Psychology, was most pointed and succinct in his description of soul. He asks psychology to return to the deepest root of its own meaning, the psyche of psychology. As educators, the depths bring us to reconsider the deepest root of the meaning of teaching, our own educare, in the Platonic sense. As noted above, to lead out from makes the most sense when we speak of it with soul in mind.

 

From soul’s perspective, the individual comes with the task of perceiving and bringing into the world that which only he or she can bring, even unto what the Greeks called mediation, in the sense of embodying prophetic capacity. Joan of Arc, Ghandi, Krishnamurti, those who Simonton (1995) called the eminent, who Nietzsche (Heidegger, 1990) calls the great man, have a place in soul’s classroom. The cosmos can be known as the immensely creative, ongoing work of art that it is. With soul comes a realization that creating, directing, and maintaining programs of talent development... (Click title for more)


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Michael Goodman's comment, August 7, 2013 12:04 PM
Thank you Bonnie for the wonderful pieces you cultivate and share.
Scott Harris's curator insight, August 10, 2013 10:41 PM

For all you Platonists out there.  Hillman is the best on Daimon [Gk. - demigod] translated to [L.] "genius."  Hillman:

 

All the names given to the quality of Genius over the years, indicate an “other,” who is the protector of our reason for being. It is this Thorn, this Mad Spot, which can be best understood when seen archetypally. The word gift also means poison. Where the poison is, you will also find the Genius. .... Where the Daimon/Genius/Thorn/Mad Spot intervenes is where education, being led out, is being requested. Those who worked best with her honored the pain of her question and worked with her to help her find her way through. Those who made light of her suffering, pointing to underachievement, were bent to remove the problem. They only found more trouble."

Susan Scott's comment, August 28, 2013 8:12 AM
Thank you Bonnie.
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Yoga and Jung's Psychology

Yoga and Jung's Psychology | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Mankind is at the beginning of a new era in regards to the possibilities of self-realization. This is greatly influenced not only by scientific advances in all fields, but also because of the gentle penetration of our perceptions by Eastern ways of looking at the universe, including individual development.

 

Yoga, an Eastern system defined by author Jess Stearn (1965) as: Union. From Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to join. A controlled effort toward self-integration so that the individual spirit may merge with the Universal Spirit in a spirit of oneness. (P. 343) has a great deal to add to Western psychology.

 

Carl Jung was one of the first theorists to attempt to understand the yoga way and bring it into awareness in our culture. Much of yoga can best be explained in Jungian terms, though parts of it differ from his theories. This paper looks at the two systems and their practices.

 

The first, Kundalini Yoga, encompasses... (click title for more)


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Tom Kenyon » The Myth, the Hero and the Lie

Tom Kenyon | Teacher — Scientist — Sound Healer - Psychotherapist — Musician — Songwriter - Singer — Sound Shaman — Author (This is the best article you will read today.
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“I think about Grotowski`s `Poor Theater - wokopi33's blog

“I think about Grotowski`s `Poor Theater - wokopi33's blog | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
“I think about Grotowski`s `Poor Theater,` and how that is so rooted in taking away the physical elements and getting to the most spiritual part of deriving truth from the script and from the performances of the actors,†she ...
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Master Richard Beleive Acting Is Spiritual - spyghana.com

Master Richard Beleive Acting Is Spiritual - spyghana.com | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Master Richard Beleive Acting Is Spiritual
spyghana.com
“It takes one with a spiritual mind to understand what acting is all about.
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New chair for Acting Department - Yale Daily News

New chair for Acting Department - Yale Daily News | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
New chair for Acting Department Yale Daily News After nearly a decade of leadership as chair of the Yale School of Drama's Acting Department, Lloyd Richard Professor Ron Van Lieu will be succeeded at the end of this academic year by Associate Chair...
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Myth and Meaning

Myth and Meaning | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Worldchanges.com - This page describes a way of understanding Myths as interpreted from the work of Joseph Campbell.

 

There are three concepts that are important in understanding Joseph Campbell's work with mythology. The first two are from Carl Jung, a Swiss psychoanalyst (1875-1961). These are the related concepts of thecollective unconscious and archetypes.

 

The collective unconscious is the term that Jung used to describe humankind's inborn predisposition to certain feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. It is not dependent on the experiences of the individual, but is instead something that we inherit, and perhaps share, as a kind of genetic memory. We react to certain instances in the same way that our human and even pre-human ancestors did because we carry the same potentialities for reaction that they did. They are "engraved" on our minds. For example, the newborn relates to the mother, because he or she...(click title for more)


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The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The United States of America has been in an uninterrupted state of war for almost 250 years (Marsella, 2011). 250 years of violence and loss… In these brutal battles, the soul of the soldier also becomes a casualty. The veterans who return home are haunted by memories of terror and bloodshed. For them a new fight begins on this ground−a fight for dignity, honor, and health−as they face the cold-blooded diagnosis and rhetoric of psychopathology.

 

The fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) (2000) strives for “brevity of criteria sets, clarity of language, and explicit statements of the constructs embodied in the diagnostic criteria” (p. xxiii). Yet in the name of brevity, clarity, and explicitness, this thick book betrays the depths of archetypal experiences. It avoids all possible contradiction, necessary tension, and expressive complexities that belong to psyche’s ways of being and its pathologies. With its codes and bullet points, the DSM-IV classifies and categorizes... (click title for more)


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Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans

Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1973) Jung described his encounter with Native Americans he met in New Mexico in 1925.  This event, though brief, had a profound effect on Jung, and he referred to it many times in his writings. He commented that his experience in New Mexico made him aware of his imprisonment "in the cultural consciousness of the white man" (Jung, 1973, p. 247).

 

At the Taos pueblo, Jung spoke for the first time with a non-white, a Hopi elder named Antonio Mirabal (also known as Ochwiay Biano and Mountain Lake), who said that whites were always uneasy and restless: "We do not understand them. We think that they are mad" (Jung, 1973, p. 248). Jung asked him why he thought the whites were mad, and the reply was " 'They say that they think with their heads . . . . We think here,' he said, indicating his heart" (p. 248). Impressed, Jung said he realized that Mountain Lake had unveiled a significant truth about... (click title for more)


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Carl Jung and America

Carl Jung and America | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud came to America in 1909 to lecture and receive honorary degrees at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.  As the ship entered the harbor, Freud is reported to have said to Jung: “If they only knew what we were bringing them!”  Jung answered: “Well, we will see in a moment what Americans do with it.”  It was Freud’s only visit to America, but the first of six for Jung. 

 

At Clark University Jung spoke about his word association tests—experiments which offered concrete evidence for Freud’s idea of the unconscious.  During the month he was in America, Jung had a whirlwind time, visiting Boston, Niagara Falls, the Adirondacks, and New York City.  He was fascinated with the diversity of American culture and its technical sophistication.  The day he sailed for home, he wrote to his wife: “. . . the unconscious has a lot of work to do, putting in order all the things America has churned up in us.” 

 

While traveling to America Jung and Freud submitted their dreams to each other for analysis.  They also talked psychology and it was while traveling together that their relationship began to come apart.  From their first meeting two years earlier in ...


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C.G. Jung —In the Heart of Darkness

C.G. Jung —In the Heart of Darkness | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

In 1925 Carl Jung traveled in East Africa. Although he had imagined initially he was involved in a scientific inquiry into "primitive psychology" (the Bugishu Psychological Expedition), he was later to admit that in all honesty his true intent was to pose to himself "the rather embarrassing question: What is going to happen to Jung the psychologist in the wilds of Africa?" (Memories, Dreams, Reflections, 272).

 

During his stay in Africa, Jung had only one dream with a black person in it. In the dream he was with an "American Negro," who had been his barber in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when he had visited the U.S. twelve years previous. The barber held to Jung’s head a red-hot iron in an attempt to render his hair nappy. He awoke with terror. Jung took this dream to be a dire warning from the unconscious that he was in danger of being engulfed by primitivity. "At that time I was obviously all too close to ‘going black.’"

 

It is far too simple a distraction to use this essay here to piss on the clay feet of the great man. Throughout Jung’s memoirs, one is impressed by the subtlety and complexity of his mind and the depth of his psychological insight – except when he writes about... (click title for more)


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Roles of a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 3

Roles of a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 3 | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The various roles in which a shaman undertakes are closely related to the cultures that one is likely to find shamanism (Walsh, 1989). This is because a shaman plays many roles for their culture. The cultures in which we are likely to find shamans are “simple nomadic hunting and gathering societies” (p. 8).

 

In these kinds of cultures, people do not generally rely on agriculture and have very little political organization or social class. As such, the shaman is left to play many roles: “medicine man, healer, ritualist, keeper of cultural myths, medium, and master of spirits” (p. 8). Krippner (2000) stated similar roles that shamans play: “Shamans were probably humanity’s original specialists, combining the roles of healers, storytellers, weather forecasters, performing artists, ritualists, and magicians” (p. 98).

 

Krippner (2002) added “shamans appear to have been humankind’s first psychotherapists [and] first physicians” (p. 970). References to shamans as physicians can be seen more than once in the literature. Shortly, we will liken a shaman to a ‘general practitioner... (click title for more)


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The Power of the Feminine - Marion Woodman

The Power of the Feminine - Marion Woodman | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

We've invented the wheel, cracked the code of DNA—so what's next for humankind? Marion Woodman, a pioneering Jungian analyst and the author of ten books, believes that individuals and societies were meant to grow. And our best chance for growth, she thinks, is to bring the feminine into our culture. The following is taken from an interview O conducted with Woodman:

When I say the feminine, I don't mean gender. I mean the feminine principle that is living—or suppressed—in both men and women. The feminine principle attempts to relate. Instead of breaking things off into parts, it says, Where are we alike? How can we connect? Where is the love? Can you listen to me? Can you really hear what I am saying? Can you see me? Do you care whether you see me or not? 

Now, these are very serious questions. And the feminine is difficult to talk about because so few people have...(Click title for more)


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Paulette Turcotte's comment, August 2, 2013 1:37 AM
yes, so vital today. We forget where our strength lies.
Elizabeth Martinez's curator insight, August 2, 2013 3:15 PM

The Feminine Movement

Aladin Fazel's curator insight, August 14, 2013 7:15 AM

every human has a part inside: Man has a part of Woman, and Woman has a part of Man; it's very useful to take part in both!! 

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The Red Book of Carl G. Jung: Its Origins and Influence — Online Exhibition at Library of Congress

The Red Book of Carl G. Jung: Its Origins and Influence — Online Exhibition at Library of Congress | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Online Exhibition at the Library of Conggress -- June 17–September 25, 2010

Features the preeminent psychoanalyst Carl G. Jung’s famous Red Book, which records the creation of the seminal theories that Jung developed after his 1913 split with Sigmund Freud, and explores its place in Jung’s work through related items from the Library’s collections.

 


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