Depth Psychology and Acting
114 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jane Brody from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

The History of Shamanism: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 1

The History of Shamanism: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 1 | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

In this paper, I will explore the history of shamanism along with the origins of the word shaman. I will identify varying definitions of what it means to be a shaman and explain some of the different roles that a shaman may carry out. I will identify how some shamans have lost their roles through the development of political/social stratification. I will also examine how it is that one becomes a shaman and have a small dialogue with regard to schizophrenia. To begin, we will delve into some of the history of shamanism along with a derivation of the word ‘shaman.’

 

History of Shamanism

Shamanism has been part of history for quite some time, but that does not necessarily mean that there is agreement within the academic community as to when shamanism began. According to Walsh (1996), “Paleolithic art from Europe dated to over 17,000 [years] ago and from South Africa dated to 25,000 years ago appear to show shamanic practices” (p. 96). However, the earliest known archaeological record of a shaman excavation was from a burial site in... (Click title for more) 


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jane Brody from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Roles of a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 3

Roles of a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 3 | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The various roles in which a shaman undertakes are closely related to the cultures that one is likely to find shamanism (Walsh, 1989). This is because a shaman plays many roles for their culture. The cultures in which we are likely to find shamans are “simple nomadic hunting and gathering societies” (p. 8).

 

In these kinds of cultures, people do not generally rely on agriculture and have very little political organization or social class. As such, the shaman is left to play many roles: “medicine man, healer, ritualist, keeper of cultural myths, medium, and master of spirits” (p. 8). Krippner (2000) stated similar roles that shamans play: “Shamans were probably humanity’s original specialists, combining the roles of healers, storytellers, weather forecasters, performing artists, ritualists, and magicians” (p. 98).

 

Krippner (2002) added “shamans appear to have been humankind’s first psychotherapists [and] first physicians” (p. 970). References to shamans as physicians can be seen more than once in the literature. Shortly, we will liken a shaman to a ‘general practitioner... (click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jane Brody from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

How One Becomes a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 2

How One Becomes a Shaman: A Brief Overview of Shamanism, Part 2 | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

How One Becomes a Shaman

Given the seemingly differing opinions on the history of shamanism and the definition of a shaman, there seems to be substantially more agreement on the process by which one must undergo to become a shaman. According to Merchant (2006):

 

The ‘call of the spirits’ to the shamanic vocation is experienced as a serious and disturbing psychological phenomenon early in life (often at adolescence) and this initiatory illness is interpreted as a (mostly unsolicited) calling, which is not only experienced as a destiny/fate but is articulated in these cultures as an election by the spirits. A strenuous and difficult initiation follows, involving altered states of consciousness, dismemberment imagery and death/rebirth phenomena. (p. 133-4)

 

The candidate is not fully recognized by their cultural group as a shaman until they are able to demonstrate their abilities of mastery over the spirits and communicate with them to acquire information for the purposes of healing (Merchant, 2006). Metzner (1998), like Merchant (2006), referred to a process where the shaman-to-be has visions in which they see themselves being dismembered...(Click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jane Brody from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Reconnecting with Wholeness with Depth Psychology -- DepthList Blog

Reconnecting with Wholeness with Depth Psychology -- DepthList Blog | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The depth psychological view focuses on mystery and the creativity and potentiality that resides in the unknown. The mysteries of the unconscious manifest when they are ready. According to James Hillman, contemporary archetypal psychologist, each of us is pulled toward a telos, a whole and complete finished product, each unique, like an acorn that turns into a massive oak tree. This is also the call of the Self to which Jung refers.

Jungian thought identifies “health” as wholeness, and “pathology” or lack of health as lack of wholeness. Jung (Memories, Dreams, Reflections, 1964) asserted that current western cultures have lost a sense of the sacred, and in so doing have become dislocated and disoriented, losing meaning and vitality by losing contact with what he calls the regulating center of the soul. This condition of being out of balance is often...(Click title to continue)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.