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Myth and Meaning

Myth and Meaning | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Worldchanges.com - This page describes a way of understanding Myths as interpreted from the work of Joseph Campbell.

 

There are three concepts that are important in understanding Joseph Campbell's work with mythology. The first two are from Carl Jung, a Swiss psychoanalyst (1875-1961). These are the related concepts of thecollective unconscious and archetypes.

 

The collective unconscious is the term that Jung used to describe humankind's inborn predisposition to certain feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. It is not dependent on the experiences of the individual, but is instead something that we inherit, and perhaps share, as a kind of genetic memory. We react to certain instances in the same way that our human and even pre-human ancestors did because we carry the same potentialities for reaction that they did. They are "engraved" on our minds. For example, the newborn relates to the mother, because he or she...(click title for more)


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Key Images & Their Impact

Key Images & Their Impact | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The French writer Albert Camus wrote, "A man's life is nothing but a slow trek to rediscover through the detours…those one or two images in whose presence his heart first opened.” The poet Stanley Kunitz believed that writers have key images that captivated them as children, and they keep working these images over and over again in their writings. The mythologist Michael Meade says that at the core of each of our lives is an image that first “moved us” into the world. And Walt Whitman poetically wrote, “There was a child went forth, and the first thing he looked upon, that object he became.”

Is it possible, as the writers above suggest, that as children looking at the world with fresh eyes, certain key visual impressions make an impact on our hearts? Perhaps giving us a “ground” to ... (click title to continue reading...)


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Jane Brody's curator insight, January 1, 2013 12:56 PM

I have taught actors to look for key images to open a role for them.  These images are partially personal and partially cultural.  The main objective in locating such images is to open a reliable emotional channel to action.

 

Rescooped by Jane Brody from Depth Psych
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Key Images & Their Impact

Key Images & Their Impact | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The French writer Albert Camus wrote, "A man's life is nothing but a slow trek to rediscover through the detours…those one or two images in whose presence his heart first opened.” The poet Stanley Kunitz believed that writers have key images that captivated them as children, and they keep working these images over and over again in their writings. The mythologist Michael Meade says that at the core of each of our lives is an image that first “moved us” into the world. And Walt Whitman poetically wrote, “There was a child went forth, and the first thing he looked upon, that object he became.”

Is it possible, as the writers above suggest, that as children looking at the world with fresh eyes, certain key visual impressions make an impact on our hearts? Perhaps giving us a “ground” to ... (click title to continue reading...)


Via Bonnie Bright
Jane Brody's insight:

I have taught actors to look for key images to open a role for them.  These images are partially personal and partially cultural.  The main objective in locating such images is to open a reliable emotional channel to action.

 

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Myth and Body: Pandora's Legacy in a Post-Modern World

Myth and Body: Pandora's Legacy in a Post-Modern World | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Being a Jungian analyst at this time in history is not particularly comfortable in most psychological or intellectual circles. Jungians are supposed to believe in universal human characteristics called "archetypes" and to support the theory that we all share a collective unconscious. Although Jung's work has some popular appeal, his ideas now seem antiquated in the light of current philosophical and scientific approaches. Mostly his work is not taught in college psychology departments, medical schools, or other places where it could have a broad impact on the way psychotherapy is practiced in the US today.

 

 Because Jung's psychology is grounded in a theory of universals, what all human beings have in common, it appears to be in conflict with many fashionable poll-modern theories. In the past two decades, any belief in universal truths or characteristics has come under close scrutiny and often been dismissed, at least in academic circles. Post-modernism is a broad cultural critique that has challenged theories of self, coherence, and almost all and any claims to truth. These are hard times for a Jungian who is supposed to believe in a universal Self, not only in characteristics that are shared among... (Click title to continue reading)


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Rescooped by Jane Brody from Depth Psych
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Key Images & Their Impact

Key Images & Their Impact | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The French writer Albert Camus wrote, "A man's life is nothing but a slow trek to rediscover through the detours…those one or two images in whose presence his heart first opened.” The poet Stanley Kunitz believed that writers have key images that captivated them as children, and they keep working these images over and over again in their writings. The mythologist Michael Meade says that at the core of each of our lives is an image that first “moved us” into the world. And Walt Whitman poetically wrote, “There was a child went forth, and the first thing he looked upon, that object he became.”

Is it possible, as the writers above suggest, that as children looking at the world with fresh eyes, certain key visual impressions make an impact on our hearts? Perhaps giving us a “ground” to ... (click title to continue reading...)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
Jane Brody's curator insight, January 1, 2013 12:56 PM

I have taught actors to look for key images to open a role for them.  These images are partially personal and partially cultural.  The main objective in locating such images is to open a reliable emotional channel to action.