Depth Psychology and Acting
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Examining Our Shadows – The Symbolism of Monster Archetypes

Examining Our Shadows – The Symbolism of Monster Archetypes | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Before we begin examining the monster archetypes, it’s important to realize that they don’t just represent a dark, malevolent side of us, but rather the part of our being that is least familiar to our conscious mind.

They become hostile only when it is ignored or misunderstood--expressing themselves through behavior that often sabotages our wishes or image of ourselves. But they serve us by nudging us toward the light. The important thing is that if you feel some resonance these or any other symbolic roles, you should examine what they represent to YOU. 

 

Let’s think of our inner monsters as our as unexplored power, bringing light to what is in shadow.... (click title for more)

 


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Bad Guys!

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Possession: ideas inspired by Jung

Possession: ideas inspired by Jung | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

C. G. Jung, the great doctor of the soul and one of the most inspired psychologists of the twentieth century, had incredible insight into what is currently playing out, both individually and collectively, in our modern-day world. He writes, “If, for a moment, we look at mankind as one individual, we see that it is like a man carried away by unconscious powers.”

 

We are a species carried away — “possessed” by — and acting out, the unconscious. Jung elaborates, “Possession, though old-fashioned, has by no means become obsolete; only the name has changed. Formerly they spoke of ‘evil spirits,’ now we call them ‘neurosis’ or ‘unconscious complexes.’”

 

To condescendingly think that we, as modern-day, rational people, are too sophisticated to believe in something as primitive as demons is to have fallen under the spell of the very evil spirits we are... (click title for more)


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Paulette Turcotte's curator insight, August 4, 2013 11:23 PM

thank you to Maxwell Purrington

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Yoga and Jung's Psychology

Yoga and Jung's Psychology | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Mankind is at the beginning of a new era in regards to the possibilities of self-realization. This is greatly influenced not only by scientific advances in all fields, but also because of the gentle penetration of our perceptions by Eastern ways of looking at the universe, including individual development.

 

Yoga, an Eastern system defined by author Jess Stearn (1965) as: Union. From Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to join. A controlled effort toward self-integration so that the individual spirit may merge with the Universal Spirit in a spirit of oneness. (P. 343) has a great deal to add to Western psychology.

 

Carl Jung was one of the first theorists to attempt to understand the yoga way and bring it into awareness in our culture. Much of yoga can best be explained in Jungian terms, though parts of it differ from his theories. This paper looks at the two systems and their practices.

 

The first, Kundalini Yoga, encompasses... (click title for more)


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Depth Psychology and Giftedness: Bringing Soul to the Field of Talent Development and Giftedness

Depth Psychology and Giftedness: Bringing Soul to the Field of Talent Development and Giftedness | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

When we as educators seek to educate with soul in mind, a radical spark is struck. Hillman (1983) pointed out “by definition, education must lead out” (p. 179). He suggested that educators lead the child out by leading the child in, by focusing on the imagination in the child’s fantasies. He urges the education of the imagination.

 

Hillman (1975), in Re-visioning Psychology, was most pointed and succinct in his description of soul. He asks psychology to return to the deepest root of its own meaning, the psyche of psychology. As educators, the depths bring us to reconsider the deepest root of the meaning of teaching, our own educare, in the Platonic sense. As noted above, to lead out from makes the most sense when we speak of it with soul in mind.

 

From soul’s perspective, the individual comes with the task of perceiving and bringing into the world that which only he or she can bring, even unto what the Greeks called mediation, in the sense of embodying prophetic capacity. Joan of Arc, Ghandi, Krishnamurti, those who Simonton (1995) called the eminent, who Nietzsche (Heidegger, 1990) calls the great man, have a place in soul’s classroom. The cosmos can be known as the immensely creative, ongoing work of art that it is. With soul comes a realization that creating, directing, and maintaining programs of talent development... (Click title for more)


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Michael Goodman's comment, August 7, 2013 12:04 PM
Thank you Bonnie for the wonderful pieces you cultivate and share.
Scott Harris's curator insight, August 10, 2013 10:41 PM

For all you Platonists out there.  Hillman is the best on Daimon [Gk. - demigod] translated to [L.] "genius."  Hillman:

 

All the names given to the quality of Genius over the years, indicate an “other,” who is the protector of our reason for being. It is this Thorn, this Mad Spot, which can be best understood when seen archetypally. The word gift also means poison. Where the poison is, you will also find the Genius. .... Where the Daimon/Genius/Thorn/Mad Spot intervenes is where education, being led out, is being requested. Those who worked best with her honored the pain of her question and worked with her to help her find her way through. Those who made light of her suffering, pointing to underachievement, were bent to remove the problem. They only found more trouble."

Susan Scott's comment, August 28, 2013 8:12 AM
Thank you Bonnie.
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Being Jungian in Today's World

Being Jungian in Today's World | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

When a local editor recently asked to write something about Jungian psychology, she opined that Jungian thought had become popular in various segments of our community, but notably not among psychologists. I had to agree with her. Best-selling books Care of the Soul and Women Who Run with the Wolves are both based on Jung's work, and Jungian analysts Robert Moore and James Hillman have been key figures in the men's movement.

 

I encounter Jungian terms in popular songs, movies, literature, and comic strips all the time. Even Madison Avenue has incorporated Jung. In one commercial, a beer-drinker joked that appreciation of Budweiser s finer qualities is stored in the collective unconscious. Nevertheless, I continue to hear the same story from university students: Jung is barely mentioned in most psychology departments...


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While Jung is neglected in psychology departments, he is vital for artists.  Whether his writings pass the limited view of psychology, they are an essential touchstone for artists of all kind because they attempt to merge the mundane with the luminous.

 

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Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans

Lessons of Jung's Encounter with Native Americans | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

In Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1973) Jung described his encounter with Native Americans he met in New Mexico in 1925.  This event, though brief, had a profound effect on Jung, and he referred to it many times in his writings. He commented that his experience in New Mexico made him aware of his imprisonment "in the cultural consciousness of the white man" (Jung, 1973, p. 247).

 

At the Taos pueblo, Jung spoke for the first time with a non-white, a Hopi elder named Antonio Mirabal (also known as Ochwiay Biano and Mountain Lake), who said that whites were always uneasy and restless: "We do not understand them. We think that they are mad" (Jung, 1973, p. 248). Jung asked him why he thought the whites were mad, and the reply was " 'They say that they think with their heads . . . . We think here,' he said, indicating his heart" (p. 248). Impressed, Jung said he realized that Mountain Lake had unveiled a significant truth about... (click title for more)


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The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The United States of America has been in an uninterrupted state of war for almost 250 years (Marsella, 2011). 250 years of violence and loss… In these brutal battles, the soul of the soldier also becomes a casualty. The veterans who return home are haunted by memories of terror and bloodshed. For them a new fight begins on this ground−a fight for dignity, honor, and health−as they face the cold-blooded diagnosis and rhetoric of psychopathology.

 

The fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) (2000) strives for “brevity of criteria sets, clarity of language, and explicit statements of the constructs embodied in the diagnostic criteria” (p. xxiii). Yet in the name of brevity, clarity, and explicitness, this thick book betrays the depths of archetypal experiences. It avoids all possible contradiction, necessary tension, and expressive complexities that belong to psyche’s ways of being and its pathologies. With its codes and bullet points, the DSM-IV classifies and categorizes... (click title for more)


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Myth and Meaning

Myth and Meaning | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Worldchanges.com - This page describes a way of understanding Myths as interpreted from the work of Joseph Campbell.

 

There are three concepts that are important in understanding Joseph Campbell's work with mythology. The first two are from Carl Jung, a Swiss psychoanalyst (1875-1961). These are the related concepts of thecollective unconscious and archetypes.

 

The collective unconscious is the term that Jung used to describe humankind's inborn predisposition to certain feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. It is not dependent on the experiences of the individual, but is instead something that we inherit, and perhaps share, as a kind of genetic memory. We react to certain instances in the same way that our human and even pre-human ancestors did because we carry the same potentialities for reaction that they did. They are "engraved" on our minds. For example, the newborn relates to the mother, because he or she...(click title for more)


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Depth Insights - What is Depth Psychology?

Depth Insights - What is Depth Psychology? | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Depth psychology, a term first coined by Swiss psychiatrist, Eugene Bleuler, around the end of the 1800’s, has its beginnings in the work of Sigmund Freud and another Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung, along with Pierre Janet and William James. Depth Psychology, which encompasses the field of Jungian Psychology, explores the hidden or deeper parts of human experience by seeing things in depth rather than taking them apart.

The self we think we know is only a tiny portion of the self that really exists. The ego self, the self we are aware of and can observe, is just the tip of an iceberg in a vast ocean of unconsciousness. Since what is unconscious is not known, our known version of our self is limited and confined. We are vastly influenced by the immense hidden aspects of the greater self that surrounds us, which is mostly out of sight or understanding.

Depth Psychology seeks to uncover or reveal repressed or hidden aspects of our self, rather like opening a window from inside the limited (click title to continue reading)...


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I have been working using these concepts as an acting teacher, with no name for my practice.  I am grateful to have come upon this concept which is completely related to the work of Sanford Meisner and other great acting theoreticians.

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Eva Rider's curator insight, October 5, 2014 3:25 PM

more on defining the depth of Depth Psychology by Bonnie Bright , Founder of Depth Psychology Alliance.

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Reconnecting with Wholeness with Depth Psychology -- DepthList Blog

Reconnecting with Wholeness with Depth Psychology -- DepthList Blog | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The depth psychological view focuses on mystery and the creativity and potentiality that resides in the unknown. The mysteries of the unconscious manifest when they are ready. According to James Hillman, contemporary archetypal psychologist, each of us is pulled toward a telos, a whole and complete finished product, each unique, like an acorn that turns into a massive oak tree. This is also the call of the Self to which Jung refers.

Jungian thought identifies “health” as wholeness, and “pathology” or lack of health as lack of wholeness. Jung (Memories, Dreams, Reflections, 1964) asserted that current western cultures have lost a sense of the sacred, and in so doing have become dislocated and disoriented, losing meaning and vitality by losing contact with what he calls the regulating center of the soul. This condition of being out of balance is often...(Click title to continue)


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Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch

Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

In a few weeks, there is Whitsun, and I will make one of my occasional trips to the monastery. The rock monastery St. George is a development center of the Benedictine  order in the Austrian Inn valley. The religious exercise will be lead by a Benedictine monk, who happens to have formal psychoanalytic credentials and introduced the theme ”The archetype of the wolf” for what to my understanding is a spiritual hiking weekend.

 

It became clear during my research, that in mythology, religion, in legends and fairy tales the wolf has played an outstanding ambiguous, dualist and multidimensional role. The wolf archetype is so  central,  that how the wolf is viewed , is a mindset indicator of human,  secular or spiritual organisations or of  the society we live in. But there is much  more.... (click title to keep reading)


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Jungian Therapy: Healing through the numinous

Jungian Therapy: Healing through the numinous | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

“The feelings of awe, dread, and amazement that accompany a numinous experience are important not simply because they help us to identify the experience as sacred. These emotions tell us that the experience has been embodied. Emotions are felt in the body as a result of the action of the autonomic nervous system. They make the heart beat faster, make us pale, and produce muscle tension and sweating. Our hair may stand on end, and a variety of hormones may be secreted. A powerful emotional reaction provokes the response of the whole organism.”

 

The numinous has an incredible healing capacity too, since it has the potential to reconnect us to a greater whole. Numinous experiences, such as prophetic dreams or stunning synchronicity, are an invitation and can signal a transition or...(click title for more)


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The Red Book of Carl G. Jung: Its Origins and Influence — Online Exhibition at Library of Congress

The Red Book of Carl G. Jung: Its Origins and Influence — Online Exhibition at Library of Congress | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Online Exhibition at the Library of Conggress -- June 17–September 25, 2010

Features the preeminent psychoanalyst Carl G. Jung’s famous Red Book, which records the creation of the seminal theories that Jung developed after his 1913 split with Sigmund Freud, and explores its place in Jung’s work through related items from the Library’s collections.

 


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The Power of the Feminine - Marion Woodman

The Power of the Feminine - Marion Woodman | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

We've invented the wheel, cracked the code of DNA—so what's next for humankind? Marion Woodman, a pioneering Jungian analyst and the author of ten books, believes that individuals and societies were meant to grow. And our best chance for growth, she thinks, is to bring the feminine into our culture. The following is taken from an interview O conducted with Woodman:

When I say the feminine, I don't mean gender. I mean the feminine principle that is living—or suppressed—in both men and women. The feminine principle attempts to relate. Instead of breaking things off into parts, it says, Where are we alike? How can we connect? Where is the love? Can you listen to me? Can you really hear what I am saying? Can you see me? Do you care whether you see me or not? 

Now, these are very serious questions. And the feminine is difficult to talk about because so few people have...(Click title for more)


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Paulette Turcotte's comment, August 2, 2013 1:37 AM
yes, so vital today. We forget where our strength lies.
Elizabeth Martinez's curator insight, August 2, 2013 3:15 PM

The Feminine Movement

Aladin Fazel's curator insight, August 14, 2013 7:15 AM

every human has a part inside: Man has a part of Woman, and Woman has a part of Man; it's very useful to take part in both!! 

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The New Jung Scholarship: Shot in the Dark? Or a Genuine Renaissance? | The New Existentialists

The New Jung Scholarship: Shot in the Dark? Or a Genuine Renaissance? | The New Existentialists | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

One doubts that the Collected Works of Carl Jung have ever been on display at a book exhibit during the annual meetings of the American Psychological Association, while Freud’s books have always and still continue to appear all over the place in that venue. We may attribute this to the failure of reductionistic laboratory empiricism in its entire history to grasp the reality of the unconscious, Freud being as much as they reluctantly have been abe to take.

 

Times may be changing, however. PsyCritiques, the weekly on-line APA journal of book reviews in psychology, has been inviting APA members to review books on Jung and his ideas with greater frequency.  My last book review for them was a critique of John Dourley’s Jung and the Religious Question, an in-depth look at Jung’s take on the role of spiritual experience in the process of individuation.

 

Dourley is an ordained priest and also a practicing Jungian analyst. Recently, they have asked me to review John Ryan Haule’s Jung for the Twenty-First century, a two-volume study. Volume one is a thoroughly original interpretation of Jung’s psychology in the context of modern developments in brain science, anthropology,  sociology, and biology. Volume two is a review of scientific studies on shamanism, meditation, and parapsychology, showing the relevance of Jung’s work for what lies at the borderline of mainstream science.

 

One can only conjecture as to the change in attitude...


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Carl Jung: the child and the Golden Egg

Carl Jung: the child and the Golden Egg | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
"The phenomenology of the "child's" birth always points back to an original psychological state of non-recognition, i.e., of darkness or twilight, of non-differentiation between subject and object,...

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:01 PM

The original image for "participation mystique"...the undifferentiated state of bliss in the womb and in the "garden of eden" where all is innocence and where is all is possibility.

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Holding the Opposites, Grounding in Earth to Cope with Difficult Times

Holding the Opposites, Grounding in Earth to Cope with Difficult Times | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

When we are not grounded, not connected to our roots, terrible psychic issues occur, which lead to feelings of intense fear and anxiety suggests Jungian analyst Judith Harris, in her book Jung and Yoga: The Psyche Body Connection. She quotes C. G. Jung, who, in his complex work, Mysterium Coniunctionus, establishes that the element of earth holds the exact central point between the tensions of two opposites.

 

Grounding oneself in the earth results in feeling held by the Great Mother, rendering one nourished, nurtured, and whole. The center is the eternal, Harris states, and all that is contained within it is represented by the archetype of the Self, which contains the totality of the psyche. The center implies stillness, and in the stillness there is space for something new to emerge. When we connect to the sacred center, the earth, “the deep-seated origins that existed thousands of years before us brings healing at a profound mystical level” (Harris, p. 76).

 

“He who is rooted in the soil endures,” wrote Jung (1927). “Alienation from the unconscious... (click title for more)


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Myth and Body: Pandora's Legacy in a Post-Modern World

Myth and Body: Pandora's Legacy in a Post-Modern World | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Being a Jungian analyst at this time in history is not particularly comfortable in most psychological or intellectual circles. Jungians are supposed to believe in universal human characteristics called "archetypes" and to support the theory that we all share a collective unconscious. Although Jung's work has some popular appeal, his ideas now seem antiquated in the light of current philosophical and scientific approaches. Mostly his work is not taught in college psychology departments, medical schools, or other places where it could have a broad impact on the way psychotherapy is practiced in the US today.

 

 Because Jung's psychology is grounded in a theory of universals, what all human beings have in common, it appears to be in conflict with many fashionable poll-modern theories. In the past two decades, any belief in universal truths or characteristics has come under close scrutiny and often been dismissed, at least in academic circles. Post-modernism is a broad cultural critique that has challenged theories of self, coherence, and almost all and any claims to truth. These are hard times for a Jungian who is supposed to believe in a universal Self, not only in characteristics that are shared among... (Click title to continue reading)


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THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY

THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

For the past quarter century James Hillman has been creating a new vision of psychology, one in which psychology becomes a "supreme discipline" concerned not only with the psyche of humanity but the "soul" which is at the heart of the world. Vilified by some, he has been called brilliant, explosive and poetic by others. His ideas, through their popularization in the writings of the best selling author, Thomas Moore (1992, 1994), have reached millions, yet he is unheard of by many professional psychologists.

While some psychologists have applauded Hillman's call for a return of the soul to a central place in psychology (Elkins, 1995), others have been put off by the fact that Hillman's own writings are critical of the humanist tradition, highly provocative and occasionally... (Click title to read more)


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Jane Brody's insight:

Absolutely unbelievably good response to Hillman.  By the way, I saw him tap dance at a conference, he was so full of joy and love, that he gave the dance to us all as a sort of kiss.

 

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ProPastoralCounsel's curator insight, February 19, 2014 9:46 AM

The search for the soul is alive and well.

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What is Depth Psychology? - DepthList.com

What is Depth Psychology? - DepthList.com | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

“The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life,” writes Carl Jung who is widely known as the father of depth psychology. “Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon futilities and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance....In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted” (Jung, 1989, p. 325).

 

Depth psychology, narrowed down to its essential, asks simply: what is the nature of our dance with the Jung’s “infinite”--and what does it mean to us? The term "depth psychology," first coined by Swiss psychiatrist, Eugene Bleuler, around the end of the 1800’s, has its beginnings in the work of Sigmund Freud and another Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung, along with Pierre Janet and William James. Depth Psychology explores the hidden or deeper parts of human experience by seeing things in...(click title to read more)


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