Depth Psychology and Acting
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Examining Our Shadows – The Symbolism of Monster Archetypes

Examining Our Shadows – The Symbolism of Monster Archetypes | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Before we begin examining the monster archetypes, it’s important to realize that they don’t just represent a dark, malevolent side of us, but rather the part of our being that is least familiar to our conscious mind.

They become hostile only when it is ignored or misunderstood--expressing themselves through behavior that often sabotages our wishes or image of ourselves. But they serve us by nudging us toward the light. The important thing is that if you feel some resonance these or any other symbolic roles, you should examine what they represent to YOU. 

 

Let’s think of our inner monsters as our as unexplored power, bringing light to what is in shadow.... (click title for more)

 


Via Bonnie Bright
Jane Brody's insight:

Bad Guys!

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The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

The Soul of the Soldier: An Archetypal Inquiry into the Rhetoric of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

The United States of America has been in an uninterrupted state of war for almost 250 years (Marsella, 2011). 250 years of violence and loss… In these brutal battles, the soul of the soldier also becomes a casualty. The veterans who return home are haunted by memories of terror and bloodshed. For them a new fight begins on this ground−a fight for dignity, honor, and health−as they face the cold-blooded diagnosis and rhetoric of psychopathology.

 

The fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) (2000) strives for “brevity of criteria sets, clarity of language, and explicit statements of the constructs embodied in the diagnostic criteria” (p. xxiii). Yet in the name of brevity, clarity, and explicitness, this thick book betrays the depths of archetypal experiences. It avoids all possible contradiction, necessary tension, and expressive complexities that belong to psyche’s ways of being and its pathologies. With its codes and bullet points, the DSM-IV classifies and categorizes... (click title for more)


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THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY

THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

For the past quarter century James Hillman has been creating a new vision of psychology, one in which psychology becomes a "supreme discipline" concerned not only with the psyche of humanity but the "soul" which is at the heart of the world. Vilified by some, he has been called brilliant, explosive and poetic by others. His ideas, through their popularization in the writings of the best selling author, Thomas Moore (1992, 1994), have reached millions, yet he is unheard of by many professional psychologists.

While some psychologists have applauded Hillman's call for a return of the soul to a central place in psychology (Elkins, 1995), others have been put off by the fact that Hillman's own writings are critical of the humanist tradition, highly provocative and occasionally... (Click title to read more)


Via Bonnie Bright
Jane Brody's insight:

Absolutely unbelievably good response to Hillman.  By the way, I saw him tap dance at a conference, he was so full of joy and love, that he gave the dance to us all as a sort of kiss.

 

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ProPastoralCounsel's curator insight, February 19, 2014 9:46 AM

The search for the soul is alive and well.

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Some Archetypes from C.G. Jung

Some Archetypes from C.G. Jung | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it

Jung Dream Interpretation is based on the Carl Jung theory of the collective unconscious. Jung provided description of seven separate characters and themes commonly occurring in dreams.

 

The main Carl Jung theory that his dream interpretation was built on, was that of the "collective unconscious." Jung believed this to be a collection of symbols that were shared by every human being but retained at the unconscious level. The symbols of the collective unconscious are provided to humans via the process of dreaming across generations and cultures.

Jung provided description of seven separate characters and themes commonly occurring in dreams throughout time as being major central to the collective unconscious:

 

The Seven Characters

 

1. The Persona – This archetype is symbolic of the dreamer whilst in dream mode. In other words, a projection...


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Myth and Meaning

Myth and Meaning | Depth Psychology and Acting | Scoop.it
Worldchanges.com - This page describes a way of understanding Myths as interpreted from the work of Joseph Campbell.

 

There are three concepts that are important in understanding Joseph Campbell's work with mythology. The first two are from Carl Jung, a Swiss psychoanalyst (1875-1961). These are the related concepts of thecollective unconscious and archetypes.

 

The collective unconscious is the term that Jung used to describe humankind's inborn predisposition to certain feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. It is not dependent on the experiences of the individual, but is instead something that we inherit, and perhaps share, as a kind of genetic memory. We react to certain instances in the same way that our human and even pre-human ancestors did because we carry the same potentialities for reaction that they did. They are "engraved" on our minds. For example, the newborn relates to the mother, because he or she...(click title for more)


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