depth psychology
135 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

What Carl Jung Means to Me

What Carl Jung Means to Me | depth psychology | Scoop.it
Carl Gustav Jung was the most famous Psychologist of the 20th Century.

 

[I]“The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed.”[/I] Dr. Carl Gustav Jung[I] [/I]

 

Carl Gustav Jung was the most famous Psychologist of the 20th Century.  Additionally, the powers of politics, art, religion, and many other disciplines have used and abused his [I]oeuvre [/I]for their own purposes ever since his famous split from Sigmund Freud’s iconoclastic orthodoxy.  Over the past quarter century, I have been drawn back to his work again and again.  I could say that I know not why, but that would be a falsehood.  

 

If you ask anyone, who thinks of themselves as a “Jungian” in whatever context, you will get a different answer about his significance.  Jung would probably be the first to tell you that Jungian Psychology is only the psychology of one man, Carl Jung himself--no one else.  One of the points of his prodigious scholarship over nearly seven decades was to show that.. (click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Active Imagination (Analytical Psychology)

Active Imagination (Analytical Psychology) | depth psychology | Scoop.it

Active imagination in Carl Jung's analytical method of psychotherapy involves opening oneself to the unconscious and giving free rein to fantasy, while at the same time maintaining an active, attentive, conscious point of view. The process leads to a synthesis that contains both perspectives, but in a new and surprising way.

 

"The Transcendent Function" (1916b [1958]) is Jung's first paper about the method he later came to call active imagination. It has two parts or stages: Letting the unconscious come up andComing to terms with the unconscious. He describes its starting points (mainly moods, images, bodily sensations); and some of its many expressive forms (painting, sculpting, drawing, writing, dancing, weaving, dramatic enactment, inner visions, inner dialogues). In this early essay he links his method to work with dreams and...


Via Bonnie Bright
Eva Rider MA's insight:

In Depth psychotherapy, The Transcendent function is an integral part of the process in making the "magic" of change happen.  Jung sometimes referred to the Archetypal witness that bridges the subject (therapy client) and the reflecton (Therapist)  as the "third" or transcendent funtion. This function can emerge as insight, the creative muse, or even appear as the trickster god, Hermes. Its function is resolve an inner conflict by moving the perspective to a new level of awareness. In symbolic language, one could imagine a triangle with the conflict represented by the oppostie poles and the solution could be seen at the apex of the triangle.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Image, Language, and the Lived Body in the Depth Psychology of the Self

Image, Language, and the Lived Body in the Depth Psychology of the Self | depth psychology | Scoop.it

In 1994 in the Ardeche region of France, three explorers pulled rocks away from a tiny opening at the base of a cliff and opened the door to another world. Inside the deepest recesses of what turned out to be a 1300-foot long cave were remarkable images of animals painted there by humans living 30,000 years ago (Herzog, 2010).

 

The images are remarkable in their style and beauty, virtually perfectly preserved in the near airtight conditions of the cave. Lions, bears, bison, reindeer, mammoth, rhinoceroses and other beings line the walls in almost three-dimensional form, many captured in dynamic action--hooves raised, mouths, open, legs bent midstride--as if they were living beings.

 

Today, it is easy to take language for granted. The majority of the civilized world both reads and writes, allowing communication in very specific topic and form.  But what is it to “have language”--be linguistic creatures? What would life... (Click title to continue reading)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Depth Insights - What is Depth Psychology?

Depth Insights - What is Depth Psychology? | depth psychology | Scoop.it

Depth psychology, a term first coined by Swiss psychiatrist, Eugene Bleuler, around the end of the 1800’s, has its beginnings in the work of Sigmund Freud and another Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung, along with Pierre Janet and William James. Depth Psychology, which encompasses the field of Jungian Psychology, explores the hidden or deeper parts of human experience by seeing things in depth rather than taking them apart.

The self we think we know is only a tiny portion of the self that really exists. The ego self, the self we are aware of and can observe, is just the tip of an iceberg in a vast ocean of unconsciousness. Since what is unconscious is not known, our known version of our self is limited and confined. We are vastly influenced by the immense hidden aspects of the greater self that surrounds us, which is mostly out of sight or understanding.

Depth Psychology seeks to uncover or reveal repressed or hidden aspects of our self, rather like opening a window from inside the limited (click title to continue reading)...


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
Jane Brody's curator insight, January 1, 2013 3:58 PM

I have been working using these concepts as an acting teacher, with no name for my practice.  I am grateful to have come upon this concept which is completely related to the work of Sanford Meisner and other great acting theoreticians.

Eva Rider's curator insight, October 5, 2014 3:25 PM

more on defining the depth of Depth Psychology by Bonnie Bright , Founder of Depth Psychology Alliance.

Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

The Interpretation of Fairytales--Marie-Louise von Franz

The Interpretation of Fairytales--Marie-Louise von Franz | depth psychology | Scoop.it

Of the various types of mythological literature, fairy tales are the simplest and purest expressions of the collective unconscious and thus offer the clearest understanding of the basic patterns of the human psyche. Every people or nation has its own way of experiencing this psychic reality, and so a study of the world's fairy tales yields a wealth of insights into the archetypal experiences of humankind.


Perhaps the foremost authority on the psychological interpretation of fairy tales is Marie-Louise von Franz. In this book - originally published as An Introduction to the Interpretation of Fairy Tales - she describes the...


Via Bonnie Bright, Eva Rider
more...
Skip_Conover's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:46 AM

We all need to understand ourselves and the collective unconscious.

Brian Eustice's comment, July 2, 2013 6:10 AM
I have always found Fairy tales dark and full of resonance. I would like an analysis of Fables also!
Aladin Fazel's curator insight, August 14, 2013 6:47 AM

Fairy Tales, i love it!! 

Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Rediscovering the Authentic Self: Jung's Concept of Individuation in Depth Psychology

Rediscovering the Authentic Self: Jung's Concept of Individuation in Depth Psychology | depth psychology | Scoop.it

In his fascinating book, Coming to our Senses, historian and social critic Morris Berman introduces the terms alienation or confiscation as a “rupture in the continuum of life.” Alienation is experienced as the feeling of an abyss where a sense of self or self-identity is missing or where the self does not feel safe. Many psychologists have speculated that this abyss or gap in the experience of the self may be increased or intensified by a lack of positive mirroring in the infancy stage.

 

Mirroring, which Berman defines as “the growth of self-recognition through the medium of other people” includes both the touch and gaze of others. Donald Winnicott, a British psychoanalyst, pediatrician, and pioneer in the clinical research of mirroring, developed object relations, the understanding of our separate self, or ego self, in relation to other objects or people around us. He suggested it starts at the time of birth because the infant develops his sense of identity based on what he sees... (click title to keep reading)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
Bonnie Bright's curator insight, February 16, 2013 12:11 PM

psychology, mirroring, children, child development, Winnicott, Morris Berman, ego, ego development, Carl Jung, CG Jung, jungian, depth psychology, individuation

Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

Myth, Image and Depth-Oriented Psychotherapy

Myth, Image and Depth-Oriented Psychotherapy | depth psychology | Scoop.it

The study of mythology and mythic imagery has long been the province of comparative religion, anthropology, literature and art. In the early 20th century, the scholarly study of mythology was appropriated by psychology, specifically the depth psychology of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, to investigate the psychological and structural implications of myth. The study of myth and its relation to dreams and psychopathology has contributed to a paradigm shift in the field of psychology, in which the symbolic contents of the unconscious, as distinguished from the rational mind and the sensational body, suggest a third realm of human influence and experience.

 

The analysis of myth has been an integral part of some of depth psychology’s most significant theories. Modern depth psychology interprets myth as symbolizing an inner, psychological experience. Yet, while Freud’s development of the Oedipus Complex and Jung’s use of mythic symbolism in dream interpretation have been widely studied, and Joseph Campbell’s work in... (Click title to keep reading)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Eva Rider MA from Depth Psych
Scoop.it!

What is Depth Psychology? - DepthList.com

What is Depth Psychology? - DepthList.com | depth psychology | Scoop.it

“The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not? That is the telling question of his life,” writes Carl Jung who is widely known as the father of depth psychology. “Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interest upon futilities and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance....In the final analysis, we count for something only because of the essential we embody, and if we do not embody that, life is wasted” (Jung, 1989, p. 325).

 

Depth psychology, narrowed down to its essential, asks simply: what is the nature of our dance with the Jung’s “infinite”--and what does it mean to us? The term "depth psychology," first coined by Swiss psychiatrist, Eugene Bleuler, around the end of the 1800’s, has its beginnings in the work of Sigmund Freud and another Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gustav Jung, along with Pierre Janet and William James. Depth Psychology explores the hidden or deeper parts of human experience by seeing things in...(click title to read more)


Via Bonnie Bright
more...