Depth Psych
Follow
Find tag "symbolism"
32.1K views | +5 today
Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales

The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
When Jung was immersed in his study of the symbolism of the fish in Christianity, alchemy and world mythology, the theme started leaping at him in everyday life. On April 1, 1949, he made some notes about an ancient inscription describing a man whose bottom half was a fish. At lunch that day, he was served fish. In the conversation, there was talk of the custom of making an "April fish" - a European term for "April fool" - of someone.
    In the afternoon, a former patient of Jung's, whom he had not seen for months, arrived at his house and displayed him some "impressive" pictures of fish. That evening, Jung was shown embroidery that featured fishy sea monsters. The next day, another former patient he had not seen in a decade recounted a dream in which a large fish swam towards her.
    Several months later, mulling over this sequence as an example of the phenomenon he dubbed synchronicity, Jung walked by the lake near his house, returning to the same spot several times. The last time he repeated this loop, he found a fish a foot long lying on top of the sea-wall. Jung had seen no one else on the lake shore that morning. While the fish might have been dropped by a bird, its appearance seemed to him quite magical, part of a "run of chance" in which more than "chance" seemed to be at play
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from The Healthy, Happy, and Wise Therapist
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung on the Symbol of the “Diamond”

Carl Jung on the Symbol of the “Diamond” | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

So it is the same idea as in alchemy—that the earth had been transformed into a transparent, waterlike, yet hard and imperishable, incorruptible structure. 

Therefore, the philosopher’s stone is the expression of the highest perfection of the earthly body, and, therefore, you also find the idea that the lapis philosophorum is man himself, that is, his corpus glorificatum, his body at the Resurrection.

This immortal body is the subtle body that had left the physical body and is beyond corruption. The diamond, the hardest mineral, is synonymous with the lapis philosophorum. This is ancient metaphysics, old speculation in symbolic form.

What does this mean psychologically?... (Click title for more)


Via Maxwell Purrington, Tammie Fowles
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Fairy tales, Folklore, and Myths
Scoop.it!

The Shocking True Stories Behind Your Favorite Classic Fairy Tales

The Shocking True Stories Behind Your Favorite Classic Fairy Tales | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Numerous fairy tales, and the legends behind them, are actually watered-down versions of uncomfortable historical events. These darker stories might be too terrifying for today's little lambkins, as well as some adults!...

Via Pamela D Lloyd
more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, November 9, 2014 2:06 AM

Interesting article on the origin of fairy tales, but whether it is so or not, they still remain Archetypal tales of the human journey to wholeness.

Aladin Fazel's curator insight, March 21, 3:55 AM

Anyway, the Happy-End is the most important thing!   

Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Hermetic philosophy and alchemy
Scoop.it!

Notes on Hermeticism by R. A. Schwaller de Lubicz

Notes on Hermeticism by R. A. Schwaller de Lubicz | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

I T   M A Y   B E   O F   I N T E R E S T  to have a look at the meaning and purpose of what is today commonly called hermeticism or alchemy. Without going into its Arabic and before that surely Egyptian etymological origins, the word ‘alchemy’ (in the commonly adopted sense) signifies the means of transmuting base metals into silver or gold. To this is attached a still more important meaning: that of ‘universal panacaea’, i.e. the means of simultaneously combating all evil and rejuvenating humankind (or at least conserving its health). To these marvels one may add those affirmed by the mystical alchemists—in addition to health, alchemy promises the means of acquiring illumination or wisdom: the key to all knowledge.


Via Zeteticus, Eva Rider
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Death By Synchronicity & The Life Of Pi

Death By Synchronicity & The Life Of Pi | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C. G. Jung recognized that in the moment of their greatest creative expression, the artist is an unconscious vehicle for something beyond themselves. At these times, their pen carries the unspoken voice of the collective whole of their culture. Like a medium or indigenous healer, what comes through them at this time can be a curative–healing comes as we hear the unspoken thing, as the needed but rejected quality in us comes into consciousness. Here the shadow’s waiting gift is born into our hearts.

 

Psyche’s roots are webs connecting us all. And more than that, the deepest place inside of us touches somewhere beyond time and space. Jung witnessed innumerable examples of our extending around these bounds in his client’s lives and dreams and in his own. He saw how often we do this, often only recognizing it later, sometimes when it’s too late. ‘Déjà vu’–French for ‘seeing again’–references this part of our cultural experience... (Click title for more)

more...
Laura M. Smith's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:44 AM

I loved the movie, The Life of Pi. Such a powerful message on the human struggle for integration of the powerful forces that live within us. That we must consume the flesh of Salome as Jung did in The Red Book.

 

"Mr. Patel's is an astounding story, courage and endurance unparalleled in the history of ship-wrecks. Very few castaways can claim to have survived so long, and none in the company of an adult Bengal tiger." quote from the report read about Patel's survival.

 

Does this not speak to our own journey when in the presence of the truths about who we are? The tiger in us, the zebra, the hyena, and the orangutan. Dying to self is a series of small deaths, in each we learn and integrate and still we are more than the sum of our parts.

 

At the end it seems as if Pi has lost Richard Parker, as if he does not know that Richard Parker lives on in him.

 

If you haven't read this incredible book, you need to!

 

 

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Across Cultures, Image Is Everything: ARAS

Across Cultures, Image Is Everything: ARAS | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism turns the human subconscious into a picture book.

 

Up a flight of quiet townhouse stairs, on a manic stretch of East 39th Street that includes, among other things, a stately cultural institute, a religious mission and a center for "foot health," hides the New York branch of a mysterious enterprise called ARAS, or the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism. It's hard to figure out exactly what goes on there, and even harder to explain once you know. But a lot of it owes to ARAS's namesake holdings: a collection of 17,000 "mythological, ritualistic and symbolic" images meant to catalog, more or less, the whole of our collective human unconscious.


"A 'symbol' points to something beyond just the thing in an image itself, beyond the knowledge that we have in our waking, conscious life," said ARAS curator Ami Ronnberg. "What we want to do is to go into an image and let the image speak on its own, to go into the deeper meaning of it."... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Pomegranates: symbolism in mysticism and dreams

Pomegranates: symbolism in mysticism and dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Last night I dreamed of pomegranates...

 

Carl Jung saw a garden of pomegranates when he was near to death: "“I myself was, so it seemed, in the Pardes Rimmonim, the garden of pomegranates, and the wedding of Tifereth with Malchuth was taking place. Or else I was Rabbi Simon ben Jochai, whose wedding in the afterlife was being celebrated. It was the mystic marriage as it appears in the Cabbalistic tradition. I cannot tell you how wonderful it was. I could only think continually, “Now this is the garden of pomegranates! Now this is the marriage.. (Click title for more)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, June 26, 2014 2:47 AM

The Pomegranate: Symbol of the fruit of the Underworld and perhaps,  thus signifying the marriage of the above and below. Tifereth (Beauty) and its married to Malkuth (kingdom). Love redeemed and made manifest in Matter. Lovely!

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Symbols of the Minoan Goddess Religion

Symbols of the Minoan Goddess Religion | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The earliest goddess figurines found on Crete date from Neolithic times and thus from its first settlers, who supposedly came from Anatolia. The figurines belong to the age-old ”fat woman” tradition that began during the Paleolithic. These goddess-figurines were found together with figurines of birds and other animals, all typical of the whole Eurasian region since the Ice Age.

 

Marija Gimbutas believed that the labyris was a symbol of the Goddess as butterfly. The various stages of the life cycle of this insect can be seen as representing the cycle of life, death and rebirth – or resurrection.

The butterfly in itself frequents Minoan art both on Crete and the surrounding islands, and some places the connection with theGoddess seems obvious, such as this butterfly goddess.

 

The bee and beehives frequent Minoan imagery. The bee was obviously associated with the Goddess, since she is often shown as half woman, half bee. Her sacred snakes coil themselves around beehives... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: The Relationship of New Age Spirituality to Depth Psychology

Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: The Relationship of New Age Spirituality to Depth Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

For depth psychology, a sort of working distinction is sometimes made between soul and spirit—soul takes a person into the depths while spirit raises a person into the heights. Soul is a way of referencing human fragmentation and spirit refers to wholeness. Soul takes us into the darkness of hades while spirit takes us into the heavenly light and so forth.


Soul is often associated with the negative emotions of depression, panic, fear, sorrow, etc. Spirit on the other hand leads us into feelings of ecstasy, tranquility, courage and joy. Soul is often associated with death and disintegration while spirit is associated with life and integration. Soul’s depths are at the center for the depth psychologist; Spirit’s heights are at the heart of the New Age religions.


Using a popular New Age bestselling book as an example, we might say the New Age is about the spiritual Law of Attraction, while depth psychology is about the soulful Law of Subtraction... (Click title for more)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, April 14, 2014 4:07 PM

These are key distinctions between New Age Philosophy and Depth Psychology.

Soul can be seen as mediator between Spirit and Matter; integrating and synthesizing both in order to live with awareness of the above and below. Living from soul is no easy task. It demands that we be awake and aware of bringing  light into matter. In alchemical terms, we are creating gold from lead. For this to happen, a disintegration of dark, unconscious, old material is paramount to the process of transformation into a larger expanded experience of the Self. Ego surrenders and expands to open and receive the light of Spirit and identifies with Soul

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jung's Theory of Dreams

Jung's Theory of Dreams | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Why do we have dreams? Where do they originate? Do they have meaning? Are dreams of any value to us, or are they just so much nonsense? These questions have puzzled thinkers since the dawn of humanity. Every culture in the world has offered explanations. For instance, the Australian Aborigines believe that what we consider the realm of dreams is the real world (the Dreamtime), and the world we experience with our senses is a dream.

 

C.G. Jung put forth a theory of dreams which is quite popular today. Following in the footsteps of Sigmund Freud, Jung claimed that dream analysis is the primary way to gain knowledge of the unconscious mind. He says that the dream is a natural phenomenon which we can study, thereby gaining knowledge of the hidden part of our mind.... (Click here for more....)

more...
Ike Cerrada's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:15 PM

The fabulous world of dreams...

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Depth Insights » A Spoonful of Depth Brings the Soul to Life: The Psychology of Mary Poppins by Stacey Jill Zackin

Depth Insights » A Spoonful of Depth Brings the Soul to Life: The Psychology of Mary Poppins by Stacey Jill Zackin | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We cannot have the extraordinary without the ordinary. Just as the supernatural is hidden in the natural. In order to fly, you need something solid to take off from. It’s not the sky that interests me but the ground. . . . When I was in Hollywood the [script] writers said, surely Mary Poppins symbolizes the magic that lies behind everyday life. I said no, of course not, she is everyday life, which is composed of the concrete and the magic.

—P. L. Travers, author of Mary Poppins (in Lawson, 1999, p. 161)

 

Clearly, there is something special about Mary Poppins that captures the collective imagination, yet the goal of this essay is not to apply the analytic lens to better understand the character of Mary Poppins, but to utilize Mary Poppins as an analogical tool to better understand the character of depth psychologists.

 

Depth psychologists believe that within our unconscious lies a wealth of material that expands our capacity to understand, accept, release, and repair aspects of ourselves, that can lead to a more developed sense of wholeness and connection. Such information reveals itself through symbols, metaphors, dreams, imagery, intuition, synchronicity...

 

more...
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 11, 2013 2:07 PM

UN INVESTISSEMENT des plus sérieux et des plus humanistes . PAYEZ UN OU PLUSIEURS PANNEAUX SOLAIRES....des professionnels s'occuperont de l'exploitation et de la maintenance ; vous aurez 20% d’intérêt durant 20 ans; car ce panneau restera le votre durant 20 ans et en plus il est assuré auprès de l'une des meilleures sociétés d'assurance au monde pendant toute sa durée de vie. Possibilité de visite.
http://home.worldgn.com/lang/fr/?u=belgouche

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jungian Views on Folktales - The Gold Scales

Jungian Views on Folktales - The Gold Scales | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung was free to look into basic issues of Eastern and other sources, including traditional sources of Europe.

 

Things depend in part on what Jack and Jill were taught to look up to and back up at a tender age. Below are some Jungian ideas tied in with old and new fiction tales. The good tale deserves to be told and listened to full well. Night-time could be fairly ideal for that, incidentally.

 

What comes out of analyses of dreams and folktales and much else, tie in with ... (click title for more)

more...
Sonia A. Jiménez Medina's curator insight, November 26, 2013 8:36 PM

"Una mirada jungiana a los cuentos"

Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:36 AM

Grâce à UnKube vous pouvez avoir des gains CONSEQUENTS, MENSUELS, DURABLES et le plus important :
qui viennent de sources différentes.
www.unkube.com/Belgouche

Laura M. Smith's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:04 PM

Fairy tales, mythology, folk tales, lore and the lost of art of oral story telling...how to keep it alive?

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Myths of Mary Magdalene: An Interview with Kayleen Asbo & Bonnie Bright for Depth Insights™

The Myths of Mary Magdalene: An Interview with Kayleen Asbo & Bonnie Bright for Depth Insights™ | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In this written interview, Depth Insights host Bonnie Bright interviews Kayleen Asbo, cultural historian, musician, writer, and teacher on the topic of “The Myths of Mary Magdalene,” also the title of her upcoming webinar series. The first of that series, “The Many Faces of Mary Magdalene” is free to the public (must register to join) and takes place May 1, 2013, at 7pm PT. 

 

BB: How did you get interested in Mary Magadelene, and where did you begin your research?

 

KA: My first memory of Mary Magdalene is as a five year old little girl, crying at the song "I Don't Know How to Love Him" in a movie theatre when I saw Jesus Christ Superstar, The song haunted me and a few years later, when my first piano was delivered, I spent the first few days trying to pick it out by ear. About ten years ago, I had a very powerful dream in which Mary Magdalene appeared and said if I wanted to find the real Christianity, I should follow the trail from France to Wales. I took the dream seriously, and have been researching early Christianity and its manifestations in France and the British Isles every since. I don't know if it is "real" Christianity, but I have discovered an amazing set of stories and myths and had incredible adventures along the way.

 

BB: That speaks so strongly to the power and influence of the unconscious on our lives—both through music and through dreams. When the dream said...(click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | The Secret Meaning of Myth

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | The Secret Meaning of Myth | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
A simplified life in nature exemplifies the ideal environment for inner growth; this fact has been alluded to in mystical literature, which expressed the need for humbleness, quietude and the beautiful surrounding of the country. You won’t find sacred literature extolling the need for 25,000 square foot castles, or the newest electronic gadget for that matter. The point was made there is a higher purpose to life, other than materialistic or narcissistic acquisitions, this involves serious inner work on our own ignorance. The advice to “Know Thyself” was the quintessence of Greek philosophy, also applies here.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Depth Insights » Stones, Spaceshots, and Shadow Siblings: Symbolic Review of Far Side of the Moon By Colleen Szabo

Depth Insights » Stones, Spaceshots, and Shadow Siblings: Symbolic Review of Far Side of the Moon By Colleen Szabo | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Canadian Robert Lepage’s Far Side of the Moon (Le face cachée de la lune) is a marvelous alchemical stirring of science, history, myth, and philosophy. It’s refreshing in that, rather than portray integration as occurring between a man and woman, Lepage’s polarized human psyche is characterized by two brothers played by Lepage.

 

As opposed to frequent philosophizing from Philippe, we know nothing of André’s internal life. He is indeed the dark side of the moon, Philippe’s shadow. Popular film often portrays the integration drama from the standpoint of the worldly one. Materially successful protagonist discovers the depths of soul and feeling hidden beneath a restless seeking after socioeceonomic power; it’s the Scrooge portrait. Lepage gives us the flip of this cinematic norm; artist and visionary with Scrooge-like shadow-brother longs to experience his creative gifts reflected....

 

- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/stones-spaceshots-and-shadow-siblings-symbolic-review-of-far-side-of-the-moon-by-colleen-szabo/#sthash.3PVIrzGg.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Alchemy - Seven Stages of Alchemical Transformation

Alchemy - Seven Stages of Alchemical Transformation | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Emerald Tablet: Alchemy for Personal Transformation - the Seven Stages of Transformation

 

The alchemists believed that the univeral formula contained in the Emerald Tablet was the basis for a spiritual technology first introduced on the planet in ancient Egypt more than 10,000 years ago. This formula consists of seven consecutive operations performed on the "matter" - whether it be of a physical, psychological, or spiritual nature.

 

To guide us through this process, we are going to make use of a tool actually used by the alchemists - a meditative mandala first published in 1759 as an illustration for the book "Azoth of the Philosophers" by the legendary German alchemist Basil Valentine.

 

At the center of this remarkable drawing is the face of a bearded alchemist at the beginning of the Work. Like looking into a mirror, this is where the initiate fixes his or her attention to meditate on the mandala.

Within the downward-pointing... (Click title for more)

 
more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:45 PM

a profound and remarkable map of the journey through the alchemical processes we encounter on the way to self discovery

 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Hermetic philosophy and alchemy
Scoop.it!

Circumambulating the Alchemical Mysterium

Circumambulating the Alchemical Mysterium | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A L C H E M Y  may be described, in the words of Baudelaire, as a process of ‘distilling the eternal from the transient’. [1] As the art of transmutation par excellence, the classical applications of alchemy have always been twofold: chrysopoeia and apotheosis (gold-making and god-making)—the perfection of metals and mortals. In seeking to turn ‘poison into wine’, alchemy, like tantra, engages material existence—often at its most dissolute or corruptible—in order to transform it into a vehicle of liberation. Like theurgy, it seeks not only personal liberation—the redemption of the soul from the cycles of generation and corruption—but also the liberation (or perfection) of nature herself through participation in the cosmic demiurgy. In its highest sense, therefore, alchemy conforms to what Lurianic kabbalists would call tikkun, the restoration of the world.


Via Zeteticus, Eva Rider
more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, September 3, 2014 2:32 PM

Alchemy - the transformation of  what was unconscious lead into illuminated Gold is the essence and goal of Soul Making, the discovery of the eternal in the transitory, the imagination made manifest in Beauty.

Erel Shalit's curator insight, September 4, 2014 5:46 AM

The author discusses the interesting etymology, such as Egyptian, of alchemy. However, there is also, as raised by Gershom Scholem, a possible Hebrew origin (see Enemy, Cripple, Beggar, p. 202f.).

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

While Jung is known mainly for his theories on the nature of the unconscious mind, he did have an interest in the paranormal. In his books 'Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies', Jung applies his analytical skills to the UFO phenomenon. Rather than assuming that the modern prevalence of UFO sightings are due to extraterrestrial craft, Jung reserves judgment on their origin and connects UFOs with archetypal imagery, concluding that they have become a "living myth."

 

Jung's primary concern in Flying Saucers is not with the reality or unreality of UFOs but with their psychic aspect. Rather than speculate about their possible nature and extraterrestrial origin as alleged spacecraft, he asks what it may signify that these phenomena, whether real or imagined, are seen in such numbers just at a time when humankind is menaced as never before in history. The UFOs represent, in Jung's phrase, "a modern myth."... (Clik title for more)

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Mystical Emergence: An Architectural Journey Through Jung's Tower

Mystical Emergence: An Architectural Journey Through Jung's Tower | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Houses are where we begin and end each day. They shape our patterns of living and contain our relationships. We cook, eat, sleep, procreate, study, raise children, store our belongings, make our plans for the future, and interact with each other within them. They frame our view of the outside world, while providing privacy for our interior lives.


Paradoxically, they conceal our deepest secrets while transparently displaying our values, tastes, and social status through their form and style. Yet, despite the extremely personal role our houses play in our lives, few of us actually design or build them ourselves anymore. More often, like the resourceful hermit crab, we move into the best shells that we can find. We rely on the skills of architects, contractors, and interior designers to shape or remodel our homes to fit our personal tastes. The elusive goal of achieving the ideal home seduces us endlessly to fantasize a “dream house” where our lives are imagined as complete, in perfect harmony between a person and a place.


Magazines, newspapers and television run stories about them twenty-four hours a day. Home tours of the rich and famous satisfy our voyeuristic interest in seeing how others live. Recently, this hype and longing for gorgeous, seductive architecture has been referred to as “yuppie porn.” Yet, it is human nature to be interested in where and how other people live. This is especially true of such deeply personal places as Carl Jung’s private retreat at Bollingen... (Click title for more)

more...
Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 8, 2014 4:50 AM

Carl Jung has far reaching significance for interpreting our modern (and ancient) psyche. Ideas of safe space and voyeurism really useful for facilitators and coaches.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Who hasn’t remembered the experience of listening to a fairy tale as a child? Why were we so enthralled by these tales? Are these stories for adults or children? How do they differ from myths, legends and sagas?

 

I am going to interpret this fairy tale using a Jungian approach, and, as I do, try to explain some of the reasoning behind what I am doing. There are particular issues to bear in mind as we do this together : the whole tale is a description of the psychodynamics of an individuation process in one psyche, and, all characters in the tale represent structures in the psyche.

 

One thing I do know having worked with, and taught fairy tale interpretation, is that strong emotions are stirred up by our interaction with tales. People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through this work. The most common error one can make is to take a fairy tale character and expect human or... (Click title for more)

 

Bonnie Bright's insight:

#DepthPsych #Jungian

 

People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through fairy tales

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, June 9, 2014 4:49 AM
Fairy tales really are incomparable teaching tools for us about the personal complexes and how they interface with the collective. The bridge matter and spirit via the cultural imagination. What is most extraordinary, I find, exploring them now, as an adult, is how precisely fairy tales detail the alchemical processes that point us towards Individuation and the redemption. They are a imagination's blueprint for the soul journey.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Dreams of the "Great Turning" by Meredith Sabini

Dreams of the "Great Turning" by Meredith Sabini | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We are living at a period of history variously called “the shift” and “the great turning.” A time when the spirit of domination, conquest, heroism, and individualism are on the wane, and a new spirit or zeitgeist is emerging—of cooperation, respect for diversity, and recognition of the interconnectedness of all life.


It’s a challenging and trying time to live through, because these two paradigms are in direct opposition; they are actively and intensely antagonistic. We might wish that the redwood trees on the empty lot at the corner here belonged to the earth, to all of us; but they belong to the owner, who has a right to cut them down, which he did. The international geological society that names the eras, epochs and periods of earth history has recently come to the decision that the Holocene epoch is over and we are now in the Anthropocene, meaning “human-centered.” (Click title for more)

more...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Wolfgang Pauli, Carl Jung, and the Acausal Connecting Principle: A Case Study in Transdisciplinarity

Wolfgang Pauli, Carl Jung, and the Acausal Connecting Principle: A Case Study in Transdisciplinarity | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Nicolescu’s quest for “a space of knowledge beyond the disciplines”4 is exemplified by the Pauli-Jung collaboration aimed at explication of a unifying or connecting principle bridging the gap between mind and matter.  Jung’s theory of synchronicity posited that certain events-often called coincidences-actually reveal the operation of an acausal connection between mental and physical events through meaning. Jung’s paradigmatic example of a synchronicity occurred during a therapy session.


In this session, his patient was in the midst of relating an intense dream she had had in which someone gave her a piece of gold jewelry in the shape of a scarab beetle. As she related the dream, Jung heard a tapping sound on the office window, which was caused by a very large insect flying repeatedly against the glass. He opened the window, and in flew a small goldish-green colored scarabeid beetle. The connection between the woman telling the dream and the appearance of the actual beetle is non-causal – the inner dream experience did not.... (click title to read entire post)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation --by John Betts

Jungian Fairy Tale Interpretation --by John Betts | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

I am going to interpret this fairy tale using a Jungian approach, and, as I do, try to explain some of the reasoning behind what I am doing. There are particular issues to bear in mind as we do this together : the whole tale is a description of the psychodynamics of an individuation process in one psyche, and, all characters in the tale represent structures in the psyche.

 

One thing I do know having worked with, and taught fairy tale interpretation, is that strong emotions are stirred up by our interaction with tales. People’s complexes and typology are constellated in uncanny ways through this work. The most common error one can make is to take a fairy tale character and expect human or reality-base qualities to guide that character and confuse the character with the structure of the psyche. ... (click title to read the full essay--once there, just scroll down the page)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung on "The Symbolic Life"

Carl Jung on "The Symbolic Life" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

From C.G. Jung...."You see, man is in need of a symbolic life - badly in need. We only live banal, ordinary, rational, or irrational things . . . but we have no symbolic life. Where do we live symbolically? Nowhere except where we participate in the ritual of life. . . . "

Have you got a corner somewhere in your house where you perform the rites, as you can see in India? Even the very simple houses there have at least a curtained corner where the members of the household can perform the symbolic life, where they can make their new vows or their meditation. We don't have it; we have no such corner. We have our own room, of course, - but there is a telephone that can ring us up at any time, and we always must be ready. We have no time, no place.

We have no symbolic life, and we are all badly in need of the symbolic life. Only the symbolic life can express the need of the soul - the daily need of the soul, mind you! And because people have no such thing, they can never step out of this mill - this awful, banal, grinding life in which ... (Click title for more)

more...
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:29 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html

Aladin Fazel's curator insight, December 6, 2013 3:47 PM

interesting as always!

Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:42 AM

Un investissement garantit 20 ans et pris en charge par de véritables professionnels
http://home.worldgn.com/lang/fr/?u=belgouche

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

» It’s Halloween: Recognizing Our Shadow Side - Psych Central

» It’s Halloween: Recognizing Our Shadow Side - Psych Central | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Watching a friend struggle to create an owl costume for her pre-schooler to wear this Halloween, I asked her why she didn’t persuade him to think of something simpler. “He says he wants to be an owl because it’s the scariest thing he can think of,” my friend replied.

 

Ahh. Precisely. Her little guy is wiser than I am. He knows instinctively what I had forgotten: From ancient times, the point of Halloween has always been to confront our fears of the dark, of death, of evil spirits and all the things that “go bump in the night.”

 

Death always has been and probably always will be a mystery and mysteries make people nervous. Our fears and anxieties about what happens next has driven the imagination of ... (click title for more)

more...
Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:46 PM

TOUT EST GRATUIT mon ami sinon je je n'y serais pas lol !
http://www.globallshare.com/fr/1200655.html