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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health

Finding deeper meanings in the language of mental health | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

A word is like a promise; a failure to deliver a kind of betrayal.  What does the language of mental health promise?


PSYCHOLOGY “study of the soul” (ψυχή, psukhē, meaning “breath”, “spirit”, or “soul”); and (-λογία -logia, translated as “study of” or “research”)

 

An essential part of the “scientific” training for young psychology/psychiatry/counseling grad students is a total denial of the spiritual (implicitly or explicitly, the message is that a true scientist must, by definition, be an atheist, and that faith is a foolish and primitive superstition).  You’d be hard pressed to find a mainstream mental health professional willing to call himself a “soul healer” or a “student of the soul” in English, though in Greek the claim is proudly printed on their business cards. .. (Click title for more)

 

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“The Red Book” by Carl Jung: A Primer For Healing Madness In A Mad World

“The Red Book” by Carl Jung: A Primer For Healing Madness In A Mad World | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Through his meticulous design of The Red Book, Carl G. Jung interwove his experience of madness with the collective suffering of his era. Such syntheses are rare — and just what the current mental health field desperately needs. In what follows, I look at how The Red Book became Jung’s journey out of madness as well as the foundation for his analytical psychology. Even today, over 50 years after his death, Jung’s analytical psychology is a relevant, non-pathologizing method for transcending madness, while also relating individual suffering to the larger collective.

The Ways of Jung’s World

In the early twentieth century, when Jung was “flooded” with “an enigmatic stream” that threatened to break him, the field of psychology was just beginning to make a science of the study of madness. Practitioners still acknowledged the wisdom of artists, novelists, and poets with regards to the nature of the human psyche. The soul was still in need of cure, and hearts were broken as much as brains. There were perhaps five diagnoses in use...(Click title for more)

 

 

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Psychotherapy Based on Depth Psychology is a Superior Approach-Lionel Corbett

http://www.pacifica.edu/psychotherapy.aspx Psychotherapists who are interested in Depth Psychology are living in a professional world that is dominated by co...

Via Mary Alice Long, Eva Rider
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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 1, 1:26 AM

This is a profound discourse by Dr. Lionel Corbett on the importance and efficacy of depth psychology for true healing and support of the individuation process. It examines the narrow and rigid psychological theoretical base that has been imposed by corporate interests for many decades leading the individual towards adaption to the infrastructure as opposed to inhabiting one's unique destiny.

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Depth Psychology Poetry and Art, Depth Insights Issue 4

Depth Psychology Poetry and Art, Depth Insights Issue 4 | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Special thanks to Jane Johnston for the cover art, a ritual Mandala entitled “Surrender.” Jane writes:

 

Jung observed mandalas, or sacred circles, depicted in art worldwide are representations of the self, and that drawing these circles assist in the containment and integration of life events.

 

Engaging in a deep inquiry requires a large container, and a year long meditation of painting a sacred mandala while holding a particular question is challenging, surprising, healing, truthful, connective and transformational. This form of self inquiry disrupts binaries, deepens self-awareness, and knowledge of the relationships between all things is gained allowing for a more realized wholeness.

 

The mandala is structured in such as way as to allow the painter access into progressively deeper levels of awareness, consciously moving through personal obstacles/defences. Both the inner and the outer world is engaged... (click title for more

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The Occult World of CG Jung: How a near-death experience transformed him

The Occult World of CG Jung: How a near-death experience transformed him | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

On 11 February 1944, the 68-year-old Carl Gustav Jung – then the world’s most renowned living psychologist – slipped on some ice and broke his fibula. Ten days later, in hospital, he suffered a myocardial infarction caused by embolisms from his immobilised leg. Treated with oxygen and camphor, he lost consciousness and had what seems to have been a near-death and out-of-the-body experience – or, depending on your perspective, delirium.

 

He found himself floating 1,000 miles above the Earth. Seas and continents shimmered in blue light and Jung could make out the Arabian desert and snow-tipped Himalayas. He felt he was about to leave orbit, but then, turning to the south, a huge black monolith came into view. It was a kind of temple, and at the entrance Jung saw a... (click title for more)

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Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind

Memories, Dreams, Reflections: A Rare Glimpse Inside Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s Mind | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
"…the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being."

 

In the spring of 1957, at the age of 84, legendary psychiatrist Carl Jung (July 26, 1875–June 6, 1961) set out to tell his life’s story. He embarked upon a series of conversations with his colleague and friend, Aniela Jaffe, which he used as the basis for the text.

 

At times, so powerful was his drive for expression that he wrote entire chapters by hand. He continued to work on the manuscript until shortly before his death in 1961. The result was Memories, Dreams, Reflections — a fascinating peek behind the curtain of Jung’s mind, revealing... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, June 21, 12:47 AM

This is Jung's only autobiography and it continues to live and deepen our understanding into the humaness that was Jung and offer solace for those of us who seek meaning to the mysteries of the soul throughout life and beyond. I have it at my fingertips always.

 

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Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: The Relationship of New Age Spirituality to Depth Psychology

Soul-Making and Spiritual Cliche' Busting: The Relationship of New Age Spirituality to Depth Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

For depth psychology, a sort of working distinction is sometimes made between soul and spirit—soul takes a person into the depths while spirit raises a person into the heights. Soul is a way of referencing human fragmentation and spirit refers to wholeness. Soul takes us into the darkness of hades while spirit takes us into the heavenly light and so forth.


Soul is often associated with the negative emotions of depression, panic, fear, sorrow, etc. Spirit on the other hand leads us into feelings of ecstasy, tranquility, courage and joy. Soul is often associated with death and disintegration while spirit is associated with life and integration. Soul’s depths are at the center for the depth psychologist; Spirit’s heights are at the heart of the New Age religions.


Using a popular New Age bestselling book as an example, we might say the New Age is about the spiritual Law of Attraction, while depth psychology is about the soulful Law of Subtraction... (Click title for more)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, April 14, 4:07 PM

These are key distinctions between New Age Philosophy and Depth Psychology.

Soul can be seen as mediator between Spirit and Matter; integrating and synthesizing both in order to live with awareness of the above and below. Living from soul is no easy task. It demands that we be awake and aware of bringing  light into matter. In alchemical terms, we are creating gold from lead. For this to happen, a disintegration of dark, unconscious, old material is paramount to the process of transformation into a larger expanded experience of the Self. Ego surrenders and expands to open and receive the light of Spirit and identifies with Soul

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The Religious Mammal

The Religious Mammal | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

"Religious experience is absolute. It is indisputable. You can only say that you have never had such an experience. No matter what the world thinks about religious experience, the one who has it possesses the great treasure of a thing that has provided him with a source of life, meaning and beauty and that has given a new splendor to the world and to mankind." Carl G. Jung


THE RELIGIOUS MAMMAL

What an amazing contemporary thought, that the human being is a "religious mammal." It is amazing because it implies that since we are human, we are religious by nature, by simply being alive as human. If this is so, and I believe it is, then the human being will reveal religious behavior as far back as we find recorded human history....

 

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Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:50 AM

Produits Universaliss Bank....Produits Universaliss Laboratory
http://www.universaliss.net/leader/trader/mpfr/belkacem1173

Belkacem Nabout's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:42 PM
Produits Universaliss Bank....Produits Universaliss Laboratory
http://www.universaliss.net/leader/trader/mpfr/belkacem1173  ;
Davina Mackail's curator insight, April 10, 4:54 AM

Interesting thought....

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Dreamer at the Garden ~ by Silvia Behrend, Ph.D.

Dreamer at the Garden ~  by Silvia Behrend, Ph.D. | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

I am a member of a collective garden, where about 20 of us work together to grow food, educate ourselves on sustainability, practice organic farming methods and generally have a good time. We have weekly work parties and also opportunities for solitary work. I have spent many hours observing nature and what she has to teach me about archetypal patterns. I have learned to look through the eyes of a pattern analyst.

At an early spring work party I saw one of our members broadcasting seeds over a bed and thought that this was the expression of the archetypal field of cultivation. This was the expression of the development of consciousness, no longer reliant on mere opportunism for gathering food, cultivating requires conscious engagement and knowledge of the processes of growth, maturation and harvest to ensure survival.

Except I was wrong. This person had used all the seeds for the entire season on one half bed. What would grow in this spot would be... (click title for more)

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"Christ, a Symbol of the Self " by Jerry Wright, Jung Society of Atlanta

"Christ, a Symbol of the Self " by Jerry Wright, Jung Society of Atlanta | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung’s ideas and writings about God, religion, Christ, Christianity, and the Christian Church are some of his most challenging, controversial, and fruitful. His approach was to take ancient “thought forms that have become historically fixed, try to melt them down again and pour them into moulds of immediate experience.” (CW:11:par.148) Jung’s own experience of the numinosum (holy) was a lifelong passion and most of his major written works in the last third of his life were devoted to some aspect of religious experience and religious symbols, with particular attention to the symbols of the Christian myth.

 

In Aion (Collected Works, Vol. 9,ll) Jung addresses Christianity’s central figure, Christ, and unpacks the meaning of Christ as a symbol of the Self. At the request of many of his readers who asked for a more comprehensive treatment of the Christ/Self relationship, and apparently inspired by a dream during a temporary illness, Jung worked on the project for several years...

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