Depth Psych
Follow
Find tag "psyche"
30.4K views | +3 today
Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jung on "Instinct"

Jung on "Instinct" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Instinct. An involuntary drive toward certain activities. All psychic processes whose energies are not under conscious control are instinctive.

 

Jung identified five prominent groups of instinctive factors: creativity, reflection, activity, sexuality and hunger. Hunger is a primary instinct of self-preservation, perhaps the most fundamental of all drives. Sexuality is a close second, particularly prone to psychization, which makes it possible to divert its purely biological energy into other channels. The urge to activity manifests in travel, love of change, restlessness and play. Under reflection, Jung included the religious urge and the search for meaning. Creativity was for Jung in a class by itself. His descriptions of it refer specifically to the impulse to create art.

 

Though we cannot classify it with a high degree of accuracy, the creative instinct is something that deserves special mention. I do not know if “instinct” is the correct word. We use the term “creative instinct” because this factor behaves at least dynamically, like an instinct. Like instinct it is compulsive, but it is not common, and it is not a fixed and invariably....(Click title for more)

more...
maria taveras's curator insight, January 24, 2:04 PM

Thank you Bonnie  for this gem of a fine. 

Laura M. Smith's curator insight, January 24, 9:20 PM

Our instincts and how they have been distorted, misused, or repressed are often reflected in the dreams. The dream will always want to move us toward wholeness...all instincts functioning and engaged in our lives.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Depth Insights » God as Intimate Soul by Paul DeBlassie III, Ph.D.

Depth Insights » God as Intimate Soul by Paul DeBlassie III, Ph.D. | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The idea of practical spirituality emerged out of an alchemical mix of William James and Carl Jung, and their respective psychic perspectives on the soul. As a clinical psychologist in private practice for the past 30 years specializing in depth psychology and psychology and spirituality, I have treated scores of individuals in the midst of making their way across the dark and troubled waters of the unconscious mind.

 

Serving as therapist and guide, a Hermetic dynamic at work within the treatment relationship, we frequently witness the emergence of a natural and immensely practical spirituality that nourishes the soul. It is of course, a vital relationship with the Self that supplants old, outer, religiosity.

 

In developing this relationship, William James (2006, p. 24) hit upon a revolutionary idea: God as intimate soul. Transformative numinous experience is nourished as we cultivate intimacies with soul

 

- See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/god-as-intimate-soul-by-paul-deblassie-iii-ph-d/#sthash.EksLVyak.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon

Carl Jung & the UFO Phenomenon | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

While Jung is known mainly for his theories on the nature of the unconscious mind, he did have an interest in the paranormal. In his books 'Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies', Jung applies his analytical skills to the UFO phenomenon. Rather than assuming that the modern prevalence of UFO sightings are due to extraterrestrial craft, Jung reserves judgment on their origin and connects UFOs with archetypal imagery, concluding that they have become a "living myth."

 

Jung's primary concern in Flying Saucers is not with the reality or unreality of UFOs but with their psychic aspect. Rather than speculate about their possible nature and extraterrestrial origin as alleged spacecraft, he asks what it may signify that these phenomena, whether real or imagined, are seen in such numbers just at a time when humankind is menaced as never before in history. The UFOs represent, in Jung's phrase, "a modern myth."... (Clik title for more)

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Image is Everything: Mythology, Hillman, and Jung

Image is Everything: Mythology, Hillman, and Jung | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Nothing could be more mistaken than to assume that a myth is something ‘thought up.’ It comes into existence of its own accord, as can be observed in all authentic products of fantasy, and particularly in dreams. It is the hybris of consciousness to pretend that everything derives from its primacy, despite the fact that consciousness itself demonstrably comes from an older unconscious psyche.” *

 

When Jung observes that “image is psyche,” (CW 13, §75), or James Hillman writes in this context that “According to Jung, the sine qua non of any consciousness whatsoever is the ‘psychic image,’” (Anima: An Anatomy 95), both men are not just saying that “image is everything” but also that “everything is image.” At any moment we are surrounded by language, images, and motifs created by the unconscious fantasy or myth-making mind (a.k.a. the “psyche” or soul) in its need to understand, make order out of, and create meaning for everyday existence... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Jung’s model of the psyche - Ann Hopwood

Jung’s model of the psyche - Ann Hopwood | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jung writes: ‘By psyche I understand the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious’, (CW6 para 797) so we use the term ‘psyche’ rather than ‘mind’, since mind is used in common parlance to refer to the aspects of mental functioning which are conscious. Jung maintained that the psyche is a self-regulating system (like the body).

 

The psyche strives to maintain a balance between opposing qualities while at the same time actively seeking its own development or as he called it, individuation. For Jung, the psyche is inherently separable into component parts with complexes and archetypal contents personified and functioning autonomously as complete secondary selves, not just as drives and processes. It is important to think of Jung’s model as a metaphor... (Click title for more)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, April 10, 2014 1:40 AM

A little more on  Jung's model of "Psyche"  ]

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Dream Remedies: Music and Psyche -Travis Wernet

Dream Remedies: Music and Psyche -Travis Wernet | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

There may be more of a connection between music and the depths of our being than we previously realized. Jung made an interesting comment in support of this notion when Meg Tilly invited him to listen to her piano playing and witness her approach to music therapy.

 

Tilly apparently felt that incorporation of music into Analytical Psychology would be of benefit, and sought to influence Jung on this matter. She was invited to Küsnacht after contacting Jung to share her method with him. In regards to the experience, he remarked, “Music is dealing with such deep archetypal material and those who play don’t realize this. Yet, used therapeutically from this level, music should be an essential part of every analysis. [It] expresses in sounds what fantasies and visions express in visual images … music represents movement, development and transformation of motifs of the collective unconscious.”

 

From a depth view of psyche, we know that dreams, too, present a reliable touchstone for accessing the unconscious. To invite the energies of the soul to speak to us through dreaming, we may yearn to cultivate ways of bringing our...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Help Understand your Dreams—and Why Its Important

10 Ways to Help Understand your Dreams—and Why Its Important | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jungian Analysis is about much more than just dream interpretation. Yet dreams can be a useful way to gain understanding about what is going on in our lives.  Dreams offer insight into ourselves that we may otherwise be unaware of, or not have in a clear or correct perspective.

Dreams typically are expressed in the mytho-poetic language of the psyche. We can say that dreams are symbolic expressions of the deep meaning, needs, and desires of the Self.

 

These 10 steps provide a framework that will allow you to better understand your dreams and thereby, better interpret the meaning of your dreams... (Click here for full article)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Psyche, Eros, and Aphrodite: The Beauty/Soul Connection - Myth and More

Psyche, Eros, and Aphrodite: The Beauty/Soul Connection - Myth and More | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The myth of Psyche (the word psyche means “soul” in Greek), Cupid, her invisible lover (Eros in Greek), and Cupid’s mother, the goddess of beauty and love, Venus (Aphrodite in Greek), illustrates how deeply Beauty, Soul, and Love are interrelated.

 

This relationship can show up in a modern context of the spa experience.  The many spa treatments readily available might be presumed to be merely pampering and possibly even decadent. However, if approached in the right frame of mind, they have the potential to touch us deeply and nurture the soul.

 

STORY OVERVIEW

The story of “The Invisible Lover” is a chapter from the greater work of The Metamorphoses (also known as... (Click title for more)...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Understanding Synchronicities: Jungian Psychology

Understanding Synchronicities: Jungian Psychology | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Synchronicity is a concept developed by the Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. It refers to a meaningful connection between events that are not causally related. More exactly, it describes a meaningful co-occurrence between an inner psychological state or process, and an outer event which parallels or reflects it. For example, if I am experiencing an inner conflict over a decision I must make and at the same time an argument breaks out between my neighbors in the apartment next door, that is a synchronicity. My inner conflict is symbolically reflected in the outer world, though the two events are not causally connected.

 

If your psychological process involves the development of a new role or orientation to life, and around the same time you also happen to lose your wallet, this is a synchronicity. Your wallet is where you keep your driver’s license and other cards that identify yourself to the rest of society. The loss of your wallet symbolically reflects your inner process of letting go of (or the need to let go of) an outmoded identity in favor of... (Click title for more)

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, October 6, 2014 11:20 PM

More on synchronicity; meaningful coincidence and the dance between; where the inner and outer worlds of psyche intersect.

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD

Liminality, Thresholds, and the Symbolic Landscape ~ Betsy Perluss PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

One of the greatest deceptions of modern culture is that there is no direct relationship between the external realm of matter and the realm of psyche. The lie continues to promote the notion that while the concrete realm is “objective”, clean and clear-cut, and rational, the realm of psyche, the dream realm, is “subjective”, vague, fuzzy, irrational, and thus, not worth serious attention.


Furthermore, through our scientific understanding of the world, which values the “objective” over the “subjective”, we have demythologized the natural world, extracting from it any symbolic meaning, having sent this back into the unconscious. The result, as Carl Jung states, is a world that has been emptied of soul and a human consciousness that stands aloof from creation, further promoting what Jung calls, “The Cult of Consciousness”.


Through scientific understanding, our world has become dehumanized. Man feels himself isolated in the cosmos. He is no longer involved in nature and has lost his emotional participation in natural events, which hitherto had a symbolic meaning for him. Thunder is no longer the voice of a god, nor is lightening his avenging missile. No river contains a spirit, no tree means... (Click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bright from Psyche, soul, culture and civilization
Scoop.it!

Jungian Erel Shalit on Psyche, Culture, and Civilization

Jungian Erel Shalit on Psyche, Culture, and Civilization | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Via Erel Shalit
more...
Erel Shalit's curator insight, April 15, 2014 9:13 AM

A legend tells us that at the very moment the children of Israel went into the Red Sea, Mount Moriah began to move from its place, along with the altar for Isaac that had been built upon it. The whole scene had been arranged before the creation of the world. Isaac was bound and placed upon the altar, and Abraham raised his knife. Read more

Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

The Role and Value of Dreams in a Post-Apocalyptic Future -- by Paco Mitchell

The Role and Value of Dreams in a Post-Apocalyptic Future -- by Paco Mitchell | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

We are living in an age widely regarded as “apocalyptic,” though many of us steadfastly try to keep the lid on our share of apocalyptic awareness. But, in the end, it is better to lift the lid and peer into the cauldron. Every therapist understands this, and every patient should as well. And the most direct way of seeing into the living darkness that surrounds us is through our dreams.

 

My approach to depth psychology has been conditioned by one particular passage from Jung, the first example of his writing I had ever seen. When I first read this quote, in 1972, the words burned into my imagination like tongues of flame:

 

Anyone who wants to know the human psyche will learn next to nothing from experimental psychology. He would be better advised to abandon exact science, put away his scholar’s gown, bid farewell to his study, and wander with human heart through the world. There, in the horrors of prisons, lunatic asylums and... (click title for more)

more...
No comment yet.