Depth Psych
Follow
Find tag "media"
32.9K views | +1 today
Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
Curated by Bonnie Bright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Image, Language, and the Lived Body in the Depth Psychology of the Self

Image, Language, and the Lived Body in the Depth Psychology of the Self | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In 1994 in the Ardeche region of France, three explorers pulled rocks away from a tiny opening at the base of a cliff and opened the door to another world. Inside the deepest recesses of what turned out to be a 1300-foot long cave were remarkable images of animals painted there by humans living 30,000 years ago (Herzog, 2010).

 

The images are remarkable in their style and beauty, virtually perfectly preserved in the near airtight conditions of the cave. Lions, bears, bison, reindeer, mammoth, rhinoceroses and other beings line the walls in almost three-dimensional form, many captured in dynamic action--hooves raised, mouths, open, legs bent midstride--as if they were living beings.

 

Today, it is easy to take language for granted. The majority of the civilized world both reads and writes, allowing communication in very specific topic and form.  But what is it to “have language”--be linguistic creatures? What would life... (Click title to continue reading)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bonnie Bright
Scoop.it!

Objectification and the Archetype of the Zombie

Objectification and the Archetype of the Zombie | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

In my last post, I focused on the idea of "watching without seeing" and alluded to how we collectively tend to objectify in our culture and resort to passive bystanding rather than engaged witnessing--that is, bringing our hearts into what we see happening around us rather than treating it as something that serves to entertain or simply shock us. 

French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre explores this theme--and its relationship to Medusa the Gorgon of myth--in Being and Nothingness.


He sets the scene by urging the reader to imagine looking through a keyhole. In this scenario, from my vantage point behind the door with the keyhole, whatever I see outside becomes the object of my attention. In this position, I am the center of consciousness, the “doer”, the subject who wields the power by directing my gaze to theobjects of my regard. There is no need or call to reflect on myself. Then, however... (Click title to continue reading)

more...
No comment yet.