Depth Psych
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Depth Psych
Pioneered by William James, Sigmund Freud, and Carl Gustav Jung, Depth Psychology is the study of how we dialogue with the Unconscious via symbols, dreams, myth, art, nature. By paying attention to the messages that show up from beyond our conscious egos, we can be guided to greater understanding, transformation, and integration with the world around us, inner and outer. Join the conversation in community at www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com
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The Core Complex of a Traumatized Psyche

The Core Complex of a Traumatized Psyche | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Trauma is an injury to our capacity to feel. When our capacity to feel is injured, we cease to be able to imagine, because imagination depends on emotional literacy. 

For 20 years, Jungian Analyst Donald Kalsched has been crafting a model of the dissociating psyche, which describes various unconscious archetypal powers arranged in a dynamic system of defense that attempts to protect a sacred, innocent psyche from further violation. In order to leave this enclave, we need to become emotionally literate, Kalsched suggests, one of the major goals of the work depth psychologists take on. This includes working through grief and despair. 

 This self-care system and all its constituents is invisible, Kalsched points out. The only way we can engage is by looking for the “tracks” they leave in dreams, in the imagination, or in the practice of active imagination advocated by Jung.

The constituents may show up in opposing forms: as a “devil” related to violence, adversary, accuser, critic, or tyrant which can lead to innate distress such as hatred, loathing, or shame; or as a “bright angel,” which suggests essential goodness, safety, bliss, hope, and love. 

 Learn more: Click the title above to read a summary article or listen to the full recording of Kalsched’s keynote address at the recent “Response at the Radical Edge” conference, courtesy of Pacifica Graduate Institute: http://www.pacificapost.com/the-core-complex-of-a-traumatized-psyche
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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, July 8, 5:10 AM
When hate breaks the containers, love is the first to leave and the result is despair, and that’s front and center as to where we are as a country, Kalsched suggests. He points to wisdom offered by C. G. Jung, who said that we must continuously develop an “imagination for evil,” so that we can move into a deeper place of understanding.
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A Conversation with Erel Shalit and Joe Cambray

Joe Cambray and Erel Shalit Introducing the Jung Neumann Symposium, June 24-26 at Pacifica. Click title to go to the video on YouTube.



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Alchemy: Vessel for Personal Transformation (Or, Alchemy: The Life it Saves May Be Your Own!) — by Clara Lindstrom

Alchemy: Vessel for Personal Transformation (Or, Alchemy: The Life it Saves May Be Your Own!) — by Clara Lindstrom | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Life change can be terrifying. When things fall apart, a threatened ego will grasp at almost anything to stave off rising waves of panic, anxiety, and depression. Conventional psychiatry is quick to oblige by recommending pharmaceutical medications that will ostensibly lift the user out of these states. However, if one has a certain amount of support and the proper map, one may actually plumb the depths of transformation and reap the rewards of those uncomfortable, shadowy realms.

 

For me, that map was alchemy, and it proved the deciding factor in successfully navigating rough terrain. What follows is an exploration of a transformational crisis, or spiritual emergency (Grof & Grof, 1991) through the lens of alchemy... (Click title to read the full article free via Depth Insights™)

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The Aural Tradition Alchemy and Sound in Psychotherapy — by Joel Bell

The Aural Tradition Alchemy and Sound in Psychotherapy — by Joel Bell | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The ocular bias of alchemy can be attributed in part to the symbolic language of dreams and projections that are at the heart of the alchemical adventure. I haven’t come across the smell or taste of the roasting salamander (though I am sure it tastes like chicken.)

 

As well, the written word, etchings, and prints like the muter librus are mute and emphasize sight as the psychological sense for gathering experience; we study the visual image. But what if we consider sound? Since alchemy starts with a symbolic attitude toward all experience, let us proceed from the perspective that sound is an aspect of image, as well.

The absence of sound in psychology is a curious thing.... (Click title to read the full article)

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Depth Psychological Approaches to Suffering—Audio Interview & Blog post with Dr. Lionel Corbett

Depth Psychological Approaches to Suffering—Audio Interview & Blog post with Dr. Lionel Corbett | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
We are all intimately familiar with suffering. And, while we might wish it away when it is painfully present, it is a normal part of human life, Dr. Lionel Corbett, M.D., Jungian analyst and professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute reminded me when I recently sat down for a depth discussion with him on the topic.
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maria taveras's curator insight, February 12, 2016 1:29 PM

Dr. Lionel Corbett, M.D. Jungian analyst brings us a wealth of gold nuggets from the collective unconscious to share with us a new and refreshing perspectives of how to make sense of the value of the human experience of suffering.

Thank you, Dr. Corbett for your contributions to this misunderstood human phenonmena. www.jungiantherapy.com

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Halloween, Masks and Your Shadow: What’s Jung Got To Do With It?

Halloween, Masks and Your Shadow: What’s Jung Got To Do With It? | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Psychologist and Spiritual Philosopher Carl Jung developed the theory of “The Shadow”. The shadow is the monster inside of us, and the darker part of ourselves that is hidden from the world and ourselves - and we all have shadow selves. Aspects representing the shadow do not “fit” with parts of our psyche, therefore we repress them as they remain tucked into a deep corner of our mind.


Jung taught that by denying these shadows hidden deep within ourselves, we project them onto others, therefore using them as scapegoats instead of facing our own unacceptable depths. Typically, this is followed by criticism and blame towards others or external systems, diverting our attention away from those unwanted parts of ourselves we would rather not ... (Click title for more)

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What Depth Psychology Can Teach Us About Vocation and Why it Matters with Dr. Jennifer Selig

Jennifer Leigh Selig, Ph.D. is core faculty in Pacifica's Jungian & Archetypal specialization of the M.A./Ph.D. Depth Psychology program. Dr. Selig teaches ...

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The Green Man

The Green Man | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The Green Man is an archetypal expression calling attention to our relationship to the natural habitat of the woods as a necessary source of life and creativity. 


The Green Man has made appearances in stories around the globe through both pagan and Abrahamic religious imagination, leaving behind a trail of art and symbolism in Europe and the Near-East.

I first heard (and have even written) about him a few months ago through Tom Cheetham’s book, GREEN MAN, EARTH ANGEL, The Prophetic Tradition and the Battle for the Soul of the World, in which Tom writes about Khidr, the Verdant One, how... (Click title for full article)

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Depth Insights » Symbolism and Synchronicity: The Art of the Tarot   ~ by Suzanne Cremen Davidson

Depth Insights » Symbolism and Synchronicity: The Art of the Tarot   ~ by Suzanne Cremen Davidson | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

‘Archetype’ refers to a principle or agency which organizes and structures psychic imagery into specific patterns or motifs (mythologemes) and constellations of persons in action (mythemes).

 

Our conscious images are archetypal when they possess an archaic content or when they are primarily derived from mythological motifs. Archetypes can also be described as ‘partial personalities’ appearing in myth, art, literature, and religion the world over, as well as in dreams, family roles, personal emotions and pathologies….In Jungian psychology archetypes are arranged under such names as shadow, persona, ego (hero), anima, animus, puer (eternal youth), senex (Old Wise Man), trickster, Great Mother, healer, Self. (Avens, 1980, p. 42)

We intuitively experience the presence of these archetypes in the image of each card in the Major Arcana: the Magician, the High Priestess, the Emperor, the Hierophant, the Lovers, Strength... (Click title for more)

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John Perry on culture and psyche

John Perry on culture and psyche | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

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10 Ways to Help Understand your Dreams—and Why Its Important

10 Ways to Help Understand your Dreams—and Why Its Important | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Jungian Analysis is about much more than just dream interpretation. Yet dreams can be a useful way to gain understanding about what is going on in our lives.  Dreams offer insight into ourselves that we may otherwise be unaware of, or not have in a clear or correct perspective.

Dreams typically are expressed in the mytho-poetic language of the psyche. We can say that dreams are symbolic expressions of the deep meaning, needs, and desires of the Self.

 

These 10 steps provide a framework that will allow you to better understand your dreams and thereby, better interpret the meaning of your dreams... (Click here for full article)

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The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales

The Robert Moss BLOG: Symbol magnets and Jung's fish tales | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
When Jung was immersed in his study of the symbolism of the fish in Christianity, alchemy and world mythology, the theme started leaping at him in everyday life. On April 1, 1949, he made some notes about an ancient inscription describing a man whose bottom half was a fish. At lunch that day, he was served fish. In the conversation, there was talk of the custom of making an "April fish" - a European term for "April fool" - of someone.
    In the afternoon, a former patient of Jung's, whom he had not seen for months, arrived at his house and displayed him some "impressive" pictures of fish. That evening, Jung was shown embroidery that featured fishy sea monsters. The next day, another former patient he had not seen in a decade recounted a dream in which a large fish swam towards her.
    Several months later, mulling over this sequence as an example of the phenomenon he dubbed synchronicity, Jung walked by the lake near his house, returning to the same spot several times. The last time he repeated this loop, he found a fish a foot long lying on top of the sea-wall. Jung had seen no one else on the lake shore that morning. While the fish might have been dropped by a bird, its appearance seemed to him quite magical, part of a "run of chance" in which more than "chance" seemed to be at play
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Psychology and Alchemy: Reviewed

Psychology and Alchemy: Reviewed | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Dr. Carl G. Jung was an historian! Who knew?! His five-decade long study of the mystery of alchemy seemed a sideshow to me for the longest time. Why resurrect an ancient practice, which had been discarded by intellectuals for centuries? What does making gold have to do with it?

Gradually, over many years of studying the master’s work, it became obvious to me that it would be necessary to enter the labyrinth of his oeuvre on alchemy, to understand what Dr. Jung was really saying in all of those books. Finally, I bought a copy, and like the Philosopher’s Stone to which it refers, it remained on my bookshelf for months, untouched by human hands—incorruptible.

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Eva Rider's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:52 PM

Thank you for this insight into Jung's work and study on Alchemy. Jungian psychology without the study of Alchemy is without its core. I have come to this understanding as well. We must go backwards and understand the roots of alchemy to move forward.

The study of the cultural roots of Egyptian and Greek Hermeticism and Gnosticism is key to understanding Jung. The Renaissance alchemists and philosophers did so in order to put the pieces of the puzzle together to find the Philosopher's Stone.  Jung pointed us both backward and forward to our selves and our relationship with Cosmos, Psyche and Matter. So, true.."he more we understand, the less we know".

Skip_Conover's comment, October 23, 2014 4:16 PM
Dear Eva, Many thanks! It's nice to see someone is reading what I write! That's something ... I hope to find more interactions with you. Best regards, Skip Conover PS Please follow http://archetypeinaction.com
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The Dream and its Amplification on YouTube

The Dream and its Amplification on YouTube | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
The Dream and Its Amplification unveils the language of the psyche that speaks to us in our dreams. We all dream at least 4-6 time

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C.G. Jung: A Biography in Books by Sonu Shamdasani - Review by Lance S. Owens MD

C.G. Jung: A Biography in Books by Sonu Shamdasani - Review by Lance S. Owens MD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

 Using a dazzling alliance of texts and images, all bound up with stunning scholarship, Sonu Shamdasani has concocted the most important biographical study of Jung published in a generation.  And to boot, the book is beautiful – another exemplar of publishing art from W. W. Norton and Mondadori Printing in Italy (who produced The Red Book: Liber Novus).  In sum, C. G. Jung: A Biography in Books radiates a rare quality I can only call “delight.” It will enchant anyone interested in the life and work of Jung.

    By the evocative act of turning the first pages of this book, Shamdasani magically conjures us into Jung’s private library for an extraordinary session of show andtell.  We sit by Jung’s desk.  He pullsvolumes from the shelves and opens long locked drawers full of private notebooks and manuscripts.  He lays them before us, lets us thumb them....(Click title for full article)

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The Sleeping King Alchemical Symbols as Manifest in Dream, Alchemy, & Creative Work — by Gary T. Bartlett

The Sleeping King Alchemical Symbols as Manifest in Dream, Alchemy, & Creative Work — by Gary T. Bartlett | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

The king is the central person of order within a kingdom; the medium through which the upper and lower worlds are connected to the middle world of mortal reality. Speaking of the centrality of kingship, John Weir Perry, in Lord of the Four Corners: Myths of the Royal Father (1966) tells us that:

In the symbolic cosmos, the locus of most supreme and intense powerfulness was the axial center, and any figure or object occupying this position became thereby highly numinous and evoked feelings of awe and reverence. For not only was this the focal point at which the world’s powers were concentrated, but even more significantly, it was the connecting link between the three planes of existence, the sky world, the world of man, and the underworld. (pp. 18-19)

The king is also, as the generator and vehicle of the law, the establisher of the boundaries of the realm. This is not a mere geographical feat, but one of cosmic and psychic (Click title to read full article)

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Eva Rider's curator insight, February 27, 2016 6:36 PM

Wonderful exploration of the King Archetype and one that is worth rekindling in these times.

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Jung, Individuation, and Film — Blog post and audio Interview with Glen Slater, PhD

Jung, Individuation, and Film — Blog post and audio Interview with Glen Slater, PhD | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Ever since I met Dr. Glen Slater in 2008, I have known him to be a particularly passionate and knowledgeable advocate of film. I often see his film reviews in…
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Jeff Hutner's curator insight, February 9, 2016 7:53 AM

worthwhile reading...

Eva Rider's curator insight, March 31, 2016 5:25 PM

worthwhile reading...

esfahanpayamak72's curator insight, April 3, 2016 7:48 AM

http://www.esfahanpayamak.com/Property

سامانه پیام کوتاه اصفهان

 

خب کار دشواری نیست شما می تونید با داشتن پنل ارسال اس ام اس یا سامانه ارسال اس ام اس که به نام های دیگه ای همچون پنل پیامک ، پیامک تبلیغاتی و.. معروف است که نرم افزاری تحت وب می باشد و پنل ارسال اس ام اس اصفهان دارای قابلیت ها و امکانات و ماژول های فراوانی برای ارسال پیامک هست اقدام به ارسال پیامک کوتاه (SmS)  به صورت تکی یا انبوه کنید

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"The Language of Trauma"—Live Video Interview 2/22: Dr. Michael Conforti with Bonnie Bright

Join Jungian analyst Michael Conforti on 2/22 for a free live video broadcast with Dr. Bonnie Bright about “The Language of Trauma" via Depth Psychology Alliance. 

Together, we’ll explore

The wisdom of psyche in communicating the unconscious experiences of traumaWays in which traditional therapy must face its limitations in the domain of traumaHow individuals, in movement towards resilience, experience benevolence which they felt had been lost not only to them, but to the worldHow therapy needs to return to its origins as a spiritual journey in order to help the individual live with the pain while opening to the archetypal experience of benevolence

DETAILS / REGISTRATION: http://www.depthpsychologyalliance.com/events/dinner-depthm-the-language-of-trauma-michael-conforti-with-bonnie

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Synchronicity Means Seeing A Heart-Shaped World —Gary Bobroff

Synchronicity Means Seeing A Heart-Shaped World —Gary Bobroff | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Both Sheldrake and the pioneering Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung noticed the statistical reality of ‘beginner’s luck’ and that with the loss of emotion came a change of luck: “a certain affective condition seems to be indispensable.”


And as with beginner’s luck, feeling (whether it is conscious or unconscious) also seems to be an indispensable condition for synchronicity. Synchronicities are moments where outer events and inner states come together in meaningful parallels that are too explicit to explain away: we were just talking about someone and they call us; we break up with someone and we run into them all over town; we feel it in our heart when someone we love needs us, or ... (Click title for full article)

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Myth and Psyche: The Evolution of Consciousness

Myth and Psyche: The Evolution of Consciousness | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Mythology is the most archaic and profound record we have of mankind's essential spirit and nature. As far back as we are able to trace the origins of our species, we find myth and myth-making as the fundamental language through which man relates to life's mystery and fashions meaning from his experiences. The world of myth has its own laws and its own reality. Instead of concepts and facts that make logical sense, we find patterns of irrational imagery whose meaning must be discerned or experienced by the participant-observer. Discovering these patterns of meaning is what Jung meant by the symbolic approach to religion, myth, and dream.


The mythic image is not to be taken literally and concretely...we must approach myth symbolically as revealed eternal 'truths' about mankind's psychic existence — about the reality of the psyche. 'Once upon a time' does not mean 'once' in history but refers to events that occur in eternal time, always and everywhere. Any myth is very much alive today. Every night in sleep we sink back into that source of all mythological imagery, the unconscious psyche — the origin of dreams. Many of our games have their roots in mythology and much of contemporary art, literature, and film is shot through with mythological themes..... (Click title for more)

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Kathy Mays's curator insight, June 3, 2015 3:20 AM

Nice description of why we look to myths and the symbolic imagery they present, which is still so alive in our lives today.

Eva Rider's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:40 PM

fascinating exploration of the archetype inherent in Mythological motifs.

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James Hillman’s Shift to Soul-Making (“From Anima-Mess to Anima-Vessel”)

James Hillman’s Shift to Soul-Making (“From Anima-Mess to Anima-Vessel”) | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Psychologist James Hillman is best known as the founder of archetypal psychology – a branch of depth psychology that developed out of and has found its place alongside Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis and C.G. Jung’s analytical psychology.


And if there is one word that is most associated with Hillman’s archetypal psychology it is probably that of soul-making. Originating out of the poetic mind of John Keats, the term soul-making as applied by Hillman refers to a practice through which individuals: slow down and deepen their connectedness to themselves, others, and the world; emphasize being over doing and the present moment over future aspirations; embrace and prioritize one’s woundedness, humanity, and limitations over a quest for perfection, transcendence, and transformation.


In other words, soul-making occurs every time we look more closely, more feelingly at the individuals peopling our lives and the ideas, afflictions, and ever-present prospect of death which together give substance and meaning to our hours and days... (Click title for more)

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Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche

Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung determined that the psychological and physical features we perceive in the world are dual aspects of one underlying reality (Pauli et al., 2001). He came to view mind and matter as a continuum, with psyche located on one end and the physiological instinct on the other, and the archetype serving as the bridge between them (C. G. Jung, 1947/1985, p. 216), though he ultimately expressed a desire to do away with a theory of psychophysical parallelism altogether in lieu of a unitary reality known as the unus mundus, a union of spirit, soul and body (C. G. Jung, 1958/1978a, p. 452).

Pointing to ways in which inanimate objects seem to “collaborate” with the unconscious by forming symbolic patterns, Jung even cited instances where clocks stop at the moment of their owner’s passing, or where items break within a home where someone is going through a powerful emotional crisis. Click title to read more...

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Susan Scott's curator insight, May 7, 2015 3:16 AM

I loved this - so insightful and broadening. Thank you.

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Carl Jung: on rebirth, resurrection, metempsychosis...

Carl Jung: on rebirth, resurrection, metempsychosis... | Depth Psych | Scoop.it

Carl Jung contemplates the archetype of rebirth and resurrection. It is through metaphorical experiences of death and rebirth that we come to know what is essential within us. His five forms of rebirth are as follows... (Click title for the full article)

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Jung on "Instinct"

Jung on "Instinct" | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
Instinct. An involuntary drive toward certain activities. All psychic processes whose energies are not under conscious control are instinctive.

 

Jung identified five prominent groups of instinctive factors: creativity, reflection, activity, sexuality and hunger. Hunger is a primary instinct of self-preservation, perhaps the most fundamental of all drives. Sexuality is a close second, particularly prone to psychization, which makes it possible to divert its purely biological energy into other channels. The urge to activity manifests in travel, love of change, restlessness and play. Under reflection, Jung included the religious urge and the search for meaning. Creativity was for Jung in a class by itself. His descriptions of it refer specifically to the impulse to create art.

 

Though we cannot classify it with a high degree of accuracy, the creative instinct is something that deserves special mention. I do not know if “instinct” is the correct word. We use the term “creative instinct” because this factor behaves at least dynamically, like an instinct. Like instinct it is compulsive, but it is not common, and it is not a fixed and invariably....(Click title for more)

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maria taveras's curator insight, January 24, 2015 2:04 PM

Thank you Bonnie  for this gem of a fine. 

Laura M. Smith's curator insight, January 24, 2015 9:20 PM

Our instincts and how they have been distorted, misused, or repressed are often reflected in the dreams. The dream will always want to move us toward wholeness...all instincts functioning and engaged in our lives.

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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | The Secret Meaning of Myth

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | The Secret Meaning of Myth | Depth Psych | Scoop.it
A simplified life in nature exemplifies the ideal environment for inner growth; this fact has been alluded to in mystical literature, which expressed the need for humbleness, quietude and the beautiful surrounding of the country. You won’t find sacred literature extolling the need for 25,000 square foot castles, or the newest electronic gadget for that matter. The point was made there is a higher purpose to life, other than materialistic or narcissistic acquisitions, this involves serious inner work on our own ignorance. The advice to “Know Thyself” was the quintessence of Greek philosophy, also applies here.
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